April 30, 2008ontentBody" --> April 30, 2008


  72 national champion trees for Texas
Rio Grande cottonwood, Texas live oak, Montezuma baldcypress among nation's 733 biggest trees; State is 4th for most titleholders

Texas boasts an impressive 72 national champions among the 733 trees on the 2008-2009 National Register of Big Trees. The biennial listing of the largest known trees of 826 species is maintained by American Forests, the nation's oldest conservation group, and sponsored by The Davey Tree Expert Company.

A new rule this year that trees have to be remeasured within 10 years to remain on the list caused the most sweeping changes in the Register's 68-year history. A total of 219 new champs and co-champs were crowned in 44 states and the District of Columbia. With 21 trees new to the list, Texas ranks behind only Virginia and Arizona for most new champions. It ranks 4th for total champs within its borders behind Arizona, Florida and California.

Forty-four states and the District of Columbia all have at least one national champ. Six states — Delaware, Hawaii, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, and Wyoming — had no champs at all.

American Forests relies on public participation to find and nominate champion trees; the nominations are then verified by state coordinators and the list updated every two years. Trees receive a point total based on their height, circumference, and 1/4 of their crown spread. Trees within 5 points become co-champions.

Among Texas notable national champs: a 489-point Rio Grande cottonwood in Fort Davis, a 425-point Texas live oak in Graham, a 394-point Montezuma baldcypress in Cameron County, a 362-point black tupelo in Wood County, a 318-point Belandier ash in Los Fresnos and a 259-point shortleaf pine in Smith.

The biggest of the big trees on this year's list is again California's General Sherman giant sequoia in Sequoia National Park, Earth's largest living thing and a perennial champ since the first Register in 1940. Standing 274 feet tall with a girth of 1,020 inches and a crown spread of 107 feet, it racks up a point total of 1,321.

The smallest big tree is a Geyer willow on Fort Apache Indian Reservation in Arizona, which stands 13 feet tall with a girth of just 10 inches and a crown spread of 14 feet for a total of 27 points. It's the first time a Geyer willow has ever been nominated to the Register.

Information about all the champions can be found at American Forests Web site, www.americanforests.org. Download interesting trivia about the champs, a description of how to measure a tree, a nomination form for new champs, and e-mailable postcards. You also can check out the list of 189 species that are currently without a national champion.

Plant a future champion

Not all trees can hold the biggest title for their species but they are all champs when it comes to helping the environment. Trees — especially big trees — provide more cooling shade and more places for wildlife to perch and nest. They sequester more carbon dioxide, trap more pollutants, and clean more of the air and water. For just $1 each, American Forests Global ReLeaf Forests program will plant trees where they are needed most in forests damaged by wildfire, weather, and man.

Grow your own champion

Give your yard the royal touch; plant a tree with champion bloodlines. American Forests Historic Tree Nursery sells the progeny of trees connected to famous people, events and places. Among those trees: the offspring of two Texas state champs — a bur oak and an Eve’s necklace — and a former champion crapemyrtle. To see a list of all available trees, visit www.historictrees.org.

Big facts about big trees

From American Forests 2008-2009 National Register of Big Trees:

General facts

  • Total number of champions and co-champions: 733
  • Number of new national champion trees since the 2006 Register: 219
  • Number of species without a national champ: 189
  • Biggest champ overall: Giant Sequoia General Sherman (1,321 points), Sequoia National Park, California
  • Smallest champ overall: Geyer Willow (27 points), Fort Apache Indian Reservation, Arizona
  • Biggest new champ: Sycamore (577 points), Ashland, Ohio
  • Smallest new champ: Geyer Willow (27 points), Fort Apache Indian Reservation, Arizona
  • Biggest new conifer: 548-point Ponderosa Pine from Trinity, California
  • Biggest new broadleaf: Sycamore (577 points), Ashland, Ohio
  • Biggest circumference on a new champ: Northern California Walnut (444 inches), El Dorado, California
  • Tallest new champ: Ponderosa Pine (240 feet), Trinity, California
  • Biggest crown spread on a new champ: Pignut Hickory (142 feet), Allen, Kentucky
  • States with the most champs: Arizona (94), Florida (86), California (82), Texas (72), and Virginia (56)
  • States without a champion: Delaware, Hawaii, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, Wyoming
  • State with the most new champs: Virginia (37)

Notable new champs

  • Sweetgum was absent from the 2006 Register and there was fierce competition to find a new champ. Ten states nominated trees, but a 384-point specimen from South Carolina beat out all the others to claim the title.
  • Three new species will be represented in the Register for the first time ever; Bigleaf Snowbell (co-champs in North Carolina), Littleleaf Sumac (Arizona), and Geyer Willow (Arizona).
  • The throne for the Ohio Buckeye (Ohio's state tree) has moved from Ohio to Illinois after a 266-point tree was nominated from Illinois. The new Ohio Buckeye champ stands at Hamburger University, McDonald's corporate headquarters.

Fallen champs

  • Number that died or were dethroned since 2006: 358

Notable losses

  • 856-point Klootchy Creek Giant Sitka Spruce of Oregon was toppled by high winds in 2007.
  • 563-point Eastern Cottonwood of Nebraska came down in a storm during the summer of 2007.
  • Louisiana's Seven Sisters Live Oak was dethroned after a former Georgia co-champion was remeasured and gained more than 5 points on the Seven Sisters oak, making the Georgia tree the standalone champion.
  • Rhode Island lost its only champion due to the 10-year rule.
  • 340-point Northern White-Cedar of Leelanau County, Michigan, was found dead. The tree had reigned since 1953.

Remaining (original) champs from Class of 1940

  • Giant Sequoia (General Sherman), Sequoia National Park, CA
  • Rocky Mountain Juniper (Jardine Juniper), Cache National Forest, UT
  • Western Juniper (Bennett Juniper), Stanislaus National Forest, CA


Easy things you can do to help our climate

The Nature Conservancy

Travel light. Whenever possible, walk or bike instead of driving a car. Cars and trucks run on fossil fuels, which release carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. In the United States, automobiles produce more than 20 percent of total carbon emissions. Walking or biking saves one pound of carbon for every mile you travel. If you must drive to work or run errands, form carpools with your co-workers and neighbors, and plan trips for gasoline efficiency.

Inflate your tires. Your car will get better gas mileage when the tires are fully inflated, so it will burn less gas and emit less carbon. Check your automobile monthly to ensure that the tires are fully inflated. Follow this tip and save 300 pounds of carbon dioxide for every 10,000 miles you drive.

Teleconference instead of flying. For office meetings, if you can telephone or videoconference, you will save time, money and carbon emissions. Airplanes pump carbon emissions high into the atmosphere, producing 12 percent of transportation sector emissions. Avoid driving or flying all the way across Texas if you can accomplish your meeting by phone or videoconference.

Plant Texas native trees. Trees absorb carbon dioxide from the air and use it as their energy source, producing oxygen for us to breathe. A tree in the temperate zone — found between the tropics and the polar circles — can remove and store 700 to 7,000 pounds of carbon over its lifetime. A tree that shades a house can reduce the energy required to run the air-conditioner and save an additional 200 to 2,000 pounds of carbon over its lifetime.

Turn down the air-conditioning. Heating and air-conditioning draw more than half of the energy that a home uses in the United States. Turn down the heat or air-conditioning when you leave the house or go to bed. You can install a programmable thermostat that can save both money and carbon.

Act globally, eat Texas-style. At the grocery store, the food you buy may travel in a plane or ship from the other side of the world, burning fossil fuels the entire trip. Whenever possible, consider shopping at local farmers' markets and stores that carry locally grown foods — or look for these in the supermarket. You will find fresh and healthy Texas-grown produce and meats, and help save our climate.

A bright idea. Use compact fluorescent light bulbs. These energy-efficient bulbs help fight climate change because they reduce the amount of fossil fuels that utilities burn. You will save 100 pounds of carbon for each incandescent bulb that you replace with a compact fluorescent, over the life of the bulb.

Recycle and use recycled products. Products made from recycled paper, glass, metal and plastic reduce carbon emissions because they use less energy to manufacture than products made from completely new materials. For instance, you'll save two pounds of carbon for every 20 glass bottles that you recycle. Recycling paper also saves trees and lets them continue to reduce climate change naturally as they remain in the forest, where they remove carbon from the atmosphere. Many Texas cities now provide curbside recycling for households.

(To find out the size of your household’s "carbon footprint" visit The Nature Conservancy of Texas’ calculator at nature.org/texas.)


Texas wine industry growing with grants

Texas Department of Agriculture

Texas is the fifth-largest wine producing state in the nation with more than 150 wineries and 220 family-owned vineyards covering 3,700 acres. By 2008, the Texas wine industry contributed more than $1 billion a year to the state's economy and supported about 8,000 jobs for Texans.

During the 2006-2007 biennium, the Texas Department of Agriculture (TDA) initiated a grant program to encourage further development of the Texas wine and grape growing industries. The programs projects focus on outreach, research and education programs for viticulture (the cultivation of grapes) and enology (the study of wine and the making of wine).

Outreach involves consultation about grower questions, problems and concerns, including site visits. Colleges and universities implement education projects as part of their curriculum. Research projects range from studying the relationship between grapevine physiology and land climatic variables to the evaluation of grape varieties and rootstocks.

TDA is currently reviewing proposals for the 2008-2009 funding cycle, which includes $2,186,000 in available grant funds.


Gardening tips

"To greatly hasten the decomposition of decay-resistant Live Oak leaves," writes Margrit Moores, "use a mulching mower with a bag attachment when you mow. This will shred the leaves and mix them with grass clippings. Since the nitrogen from the grass will soon be used up, add another nitrogen source, such as bloodmeal or manure, to your compost pile."

Have a favorite gardening tip you'd like to share? Texas Gardener's Seeds is seeking brief gardening tips from Texas gardeners to use in future issues. If we publish your tip in Seeds, we will send you a free Texas Gardener T-shirt. Here's a chance to get published and be a garden stylist as well! Please send your tips of 50 words or less to the editor at: Gardening Tips.


Did You Know...

Yarrow is an ancient flower, named for Achilles, who used it to treat the wounds of his soldiers on the battlefield. Yarrow has been found to contain astringent tannin and salicylic acid, which is antiseptic.


Upcoming garden events

Tyler: The Smith County Master Gardeners will hold their 6th Annual Home Garden Tour, rain or shine, on Saturday, May 3 from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. Five private gardens in Tyler will be showcased on the tour. Tickets will be available April 1 and are $8.00 in advance. They can be purchased from The Smith County AgriLife Extension office at 1517 W. Front St., Suite 116, Tyler, TX 75702 or by mail from Andie Rathbone, 13270 Oak Hill Lane, Flint, TX 75762. Tickets will also be available on the day of the tour for $10.00 and can be purchased at any of the gardens on the tour. For more information, visit http://grovesite.com/mg/smg.

Rockport: The Aransas/San Patricio Master Gardener Association will hold its annual "Hidden Gardens Tour" Saturday, May 3, from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. Arrive at Green Acres, 611 East Mimosa Street at Pearl Street, Rockport, and get your tickets and maps for this one-day event. Receive maps to wonderful Hidden Gardens in both Aransas County and San Patricio County. Be sure to take the time to wander through the demonstration gardens at Green Acres which are continuously being updated and maintained by the Aransas/San Patricio Master Gardener Association. This event is open to the public. The cost is $10.00. For pre-registration tickets or for more information, contact The Texas AgriLife Extension Service at (361) 790-0103.

San Antonio: Comal Master Gardeners and Antique Rose Emporium will present An Herb Affair, an herb festival with demos, crafts, samples, and info for growing, from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m., May 3 at the Antique Rose Emporium, 7561 E. Evans Road., San Antonio. For more information, call (210) 651-4546 or visit www.antiqueroseemporium.com/event.

El Paso: Visit five private gardens in El Paso through The Garden Conservancy's Open Days Program, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday, May 10. At the Wiseman Garden — La Casa Que Canta (924 Cherry Hill Lane), features include a unique blend of native desert landscaping mixed with mounds of lush green grass, a Colonial Spanish courtyard with an Old World fountain, and a breathtaking view of the Franklin Mountains and Coronado Golf Course. The lush and textural Duncan Garden (500 Thunder Crest Lane) overlooks a huge arroyo and includes city views, Xeriscape gardens with more than 100 different kinds of plants, and a 50-foot waterfall. The Enriquez Family Garden, at the base of Franklin Mountain (553 Canyon Springs) includes a children's play space surrounded by fruit trees and greenery, a grotto which invites meditation, and a gazebo used for entertaining family and friends. The must-see Nash Gardens (269 Fountain Road) includes a variety of gardens on one-and-one-half-acres. Visitors will meander through rose, water, tropical, traditional, topiary, and Xeriscape gardens. At the Ventana Garden (5500 Ventana Del Sol), enjoy the views nature has provided of the Franklin Mountain arroyo, and admire the large outdoor fireplace and man-made waterfalls and ponds that attract colored finches, doves, and sparrows. Visitors may begin the tour on May 10 at any of the participating gardens, all open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission to each private garden is $5, Open Days are rain or shine, and no reservations are required. Discounted admission tickets (5 for $20) are available at Nash Gardens, 150 East Sunset Road. For more information, call (888) 842-2442 or visit www.opendaysprogram.org. A portion of the proceeds collected at each garden will benefit the El Dedon Verde Garden Club and Master Gardener Association.

Sugar Land: The Sugar Land Garden Club will host its annual Spring Garden Tour on Saturday, May 10 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The tour, which makes a great Mother’s Day activity, showcases eight lovely gardens in the Sugar Land area. A wide variety of styles and designs will be featured including a Monet-inspired theme; cottage, topiary and tropical styles; and an Asian garden with a Koi pond. Club members will be available at each location to share gardening tips and to answer questions. Tickets are $10 for the entire tour or $2 each for a single garden, and are available for purchase at any of the gardens on the day of the tour. For recommended starting locations or a map of the gardens, visit www.sugarlandgardenclub.org or call (281) 565-4658.

Denton County: The Denton County Master Gardener Association presents the 2008 Walk Through the Gardens Tour of private gardens in Southern Denton County on Saturday, May 10, from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. For more information, call (940) 349-2883 or visit http://www.dcmga.com.

Amarillo: The Amarillo Area Master Gardeners will present The “how-to and with what” of container gardening, 10 a.m. to noon, May 17. Bring your container (minimum 12-inch diameter), buy items from their plant collections and create a beautiful, original container garden. Soil is provided. Class will be held at the Potter County AgriLife Extension Office, 3301 E. 10th (Tri-State Fairgrounds), Amarillo. To register, or for more information, call (806) 373-0713. Registration deadline May 9. Limited enrollment. Cost $10.

Austin: Learn how to creating a Tropical Paradise by attending a free seminar featuring speakers are from the Travis County Master Gardener Association and Natural Gardener Nursery staff, Wednesday, May 21, 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. at Zilker Botanical Garden, 2220 Barton Springs Rd., Austin. Perennial Tropical Plans for Central Texas covers many of the tropical plants that can tolerate/thrive in the local growing conditions. Plant this selection once and enjoy the look for a long time. Tropical Plants for the Interior discusses the conditions preferred by the plants to remain healthy. Many varieties that favor interior living are included. Time will be spent on problems and pest that are common to interior tropical plants. How to Grow Ferns to create a lush look. Discover the varieties of ferns and conditions necessary for successful growing ferns in our local area. Integrating Tropicals with Natives for a Tropical Look discusses using tropical plants as annuals as well as in pots along with perennials to create that tropical feel. Bring samples of diseased, bug eaten, sick plants to the Plant Clinic. Experts will diagnose the problem and offer possible remedies. The seminar is sponsored by the Travis County Master Gardener Association in partnership with the AgriLife Extension, Travis County. For more information, call (512) 854-9600 and ask for the Master Gardener's desk or visit http://www.tcmastergardeners.org.

San Antonio: The San Antonio Water System presents the 11th annual Festival of Flowers, Saturday, May 24, from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. at Alzafar Shrine Hall, 901 N. Loop 1604, between Highway 281 and Blanco Road. Seminars include "Gardening Green — What It Means," led by John Dromgoole, Lady Bug Products, Austin's "Natural Gardener" on KLBJ Radio; "Creating Patio Gardens," led by Dr. Jerry Parsons, Horticulture Specialist, Texas AgriLife Extension Service, Co-host of Milberger's Gardening South Texas on KLUP Radio; and "Growing Lavender the Texas Hill Country Way," led by Jeannie Ralston, former owner of Hill Country Lavender, author of The Unlikely Lavender Queen. Admission is $5. Parking is free. For additional information, visit www.SAFestivalofFlowers.com.

Nacogdoches: The Stephen F. Austin State University Pineywoods Native Plant Center will host the 4th Lone Star Regional Native Plant Conference May 28-31 in Nacogdoches. The conference will be held on the beautiful SFA campus, which is home to the Mast Arboretum, the Ruby Mize Azalea Garden, as well as the 40-acre Pineywoods Native Plant Center. Join a unique blend of naturalists, horticulturists, nurserymen, landscapers, and gardeners to hear talks ranging from rare plants to conservation and propagation. Complete Conference Package, which includes all meals Thursday-Saturday, Thursday field trip, Friday through Sunday conference, Saturday program/dance; and proceedings — $250 May 7th or before; $300 after May 7th. For additional information, visit http://pnpc.sfasu.edu.

Santa Fe, N.M.: The 12th annual Santa Fe Botanical Garden tours will take place Sunday, June 1, and Sunday, June 8, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Featured gardens include Xeriscape, shade gardening, hearty perennials, roses, great estates and an historic compound. $35 per person per tour; $60 for both tours; under 16, free. Tickets on sale May 1 through the Lensic Box Office, (505) 988-1234.

Fort Worth: The Organic Garden Club of Greater Fort Worth will present a Natural Urban Living Symposium June 21 from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. at the Fort Worth Botanic Gardens, 3220 Botanic Garden Drive, Fort Worth. Presentations include "Rainwater Harvesting," presented by Pam Daniel, Rainwater Solutions; "Natural Home Cleaning," presented by Larry White, That Orange Stuff; "Nutrition & Aromatherapy," presented by Judy Griffin, Ph.D.-Nutrition; and "Organic Gardening," presented by Coleen Thornton, Heaven Sent Produce. The symposium is free.

Austin: The Travis County Master Gardeners Association in partnership with the Travis Country AgriLife Extension will present a seminar on pond building at the Zilker Botanical Garden, 2220 Barton Springs Road, Austin, from 10 a.m. until noon, Saturday, June 7. Among the topics covered will be small pond construction, pond plants, fish selection, and general pond maintenance. Although the seminar is free, the Austin Parks Department charges $3 for parking. For additional information, call (512) 854-9600 and ask for the Master Gardener's desk or visit www.tcmastergardeners.org.

Georgetown: Junior Master Gardener Specialist Training will be presented June 11-12, at the Williamson County Extension Office, 3151 SE Innerloop Road, Georgetown. For additional information, contact Donna Colburn, at (512) 943-3300 or dmcolburn@ag.tamu.edu.

Blanco: The Blanco Chamber of Commerce will host the fourth annual Blanco Lavender Festival June 14-15. The entire town of Blanco and the surrounding countryside will be bathed in lavender during the Lavender Festival. The Lavender Market, on the grounds of the historic Blanco County Courthouse, is always a must-see highlight of the festival. Selected vendors and artists from across the Hill Country will offer lavender-related pleasures and treasures from the finest craftsmen. At the courthouse, speakers give lavender-related educational programs. Texas Lavender Hills Farm & Market will be part of the Blanco Lavender Festival tour each day from 9 a.m. until 6 p.m. Events at the farm include lavender crafts, pick-your-own lavender, live music, picnic lunches, lavender lemonade, lavender peach tea, lavender goats milk ice cream, lavender products for sale and more. For more information about the festival, visit www.blancolavenderfest.com/festival/index.php. For more information about Texas Lavender Hills Farm & Market, visit http://www.texaslavenderhills.com/.

Austin: The Travis County Master Gardener Association in partnership with the Travis County AgriLife Extension will sponsor "What is Wrong with this Plant?" a seminar to help gardeners understand the causes of plant problems, the process for diagnosing plant problems, and techniques and strategies to help plants overcome problems, from 10 a.m. until noon, Saturday, July 12, at the Zilker Botanical Garden, 2220 Barton Springs Road, Austin. A Plant Clinic will be open during the seminar, and expert guidance will be available to examine diseased or bug-eaten plants that attendees bring to the seminar. Attendance is free. For additional information, call (512) 854-9600 and ask for the Master Gardeners desk or visit http://www.tcmastergardeners.org.

Rockport: The Aransas/San Patricio Master Gardener Association will hold a "Fall Plant Sale" Saturday, September 27, from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. at Green Acres, 611 East Mimosa Street at Pearl Street, Rockport. Purchase those much-wanted plants that you have been wanting to buy and can't find anywhere. Be sure to take the time to wander through the demonstration gardens at Green Acres which are continuously being updated and maintained by the Aransas/San Patricio Master Gardener Association. This event is open to the public. For additional information, contact The Texas AgriLife Extension Service at (361) 790-0103.

MONTHLY MEETINGS

Kilgore: Northeast Texas Organic Gardeners meets at 1 p.m. on the first Wednesday of each month at a new eco-farm in Kilgore. For more information, call Carole Ramke at (903) 986-9475.

Allen: The Allen Garden Club meets on the first Thursday of each month at 7:30 p.m. at the little blue-gray house located at 102 N. Allen Dr., Allen. For more information, visit www.allengardenclub.org.

Austin: Austin Organic Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. on the second Monday of each month at the Zilker Botanical Gardens in Austin. For more information, visit www.main.org/aog.

Friendswood: The second Tuesday of each month the Harris County Precinct 2 Master Gardeners hold a free evening educational program for the public, called the Green Thumb Series, at Southeast Church of Christ, 2400 W Bay Area Blvd., Friendswood, about 1 mile west of I-45 and Baybrook Mall. For more information visit http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu or call (281) 991-8437.

Rockport: The Rockport Herb & Rose Study Group, founded in March 2003, meets the second Wednesday of each month, with the exceptions of June and July, to discuss all aspects of using and growing herbs, including historical uses and tips for successful propagation and cultivation, meets at 619 N. Live Oak Street, Room 14, Rockport at 10 a.m. Sometimes they take field trips and have cooking demonstrations in different locations. For more information, contact Linda (361) 729-6037, Ruth (361) 729-8923 or Cindy (979) 562-2153 or visit www.rockportherbs.com.

San Antonio: The San Antonio Herb Society meets at 7 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month at the San Antonio Garden Center, 3310 N. New Braunfels (corner of Funston & N. New Braunfels). For more information on programs, visit www.sanantonioherbs.org.

Dallas: The Rainbow Garden Club of North Texas meets the second Sunday of each month at 2 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Meetings are held at member's homes and garden centers around the area. For more information, visit www.RainbowGardenClub.com.

Denton: The Denton Organic Society, a group devoted to sharing information and educating the public regarding organic principles, meets the third Wednesday of each month (except July, August and December) at the Denton Senior Center, 509 N. Bell Avenue. Meetings are free and open to the public. Meetings begin at 7 p.m. and are preceded by a social at 6:30. For more information, call (940) 382-8551.

Houston: The Native Plant Society of Texas — Houston (NPSOT-H) meets at 7 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except for October (4th Thursday) and December (2nd Thursday). Location varies. For locations, for more information on programs, and for information about native plants for Houston, visit http://www.npsot.org/Houston.

Seguin: The Guadalupe County Master Gardeners meets the third Thursday of each month at the Texas AgriLife Extension Bldg. at 210 E. Live Oak at 7 p.m. For more information, phone (830) 379-1972 or visit www.guadalupecountymastergardeners.org.

Longview: The Northeast Texas chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets the third Thursday of each month at St. Mary's Parish Hall in Longview. For more information, call Logan Damewood at (903) 295-1984.

Edna: The Jackson County Master Gardeners present their "Come Grown With Us" seminars on the fourth Tuesday of each month, January through October, beginning at 7 p.m. at 411 N. Wells, Edna. The seminars are free, open to the public and offer 2 CEU hours to Master Gardeners or others requiring them. For additional information, contact the Jackson County Extension Office at (361) 782-3312.

Fort Worth: The Organic Garden Club of Forth Worth meets at 7 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday of each month except July and December at the Fort Worth Botanic Gardens main building. Refreshments are served. For more information, call (817) 274-8460.

Seabrook: The Harris County Precinct 2 Master Gardeners hold an educational program at 10 a.m. on the fourth Wednesday of each month at The Meeting Room (on the Lakeside) at Clear Lake Park, 5001 NASA Road 1, Seabrook. The programs are free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu.

Dallas: The Dallas Organic Garden Club meets at 6:45 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of each month at the Fretz Park Recreation Center, located at the corner of Hillcrest and Beltline Road in Dallas. For more information, call (214) 824-2448 or visit www.dogc.org.

Arlington: The Arlington Organic Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the last Thursday of each month (except November and December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact David at (817) 483-7746.

If you would like your organization's events included in "Upcoming Garden Events," please contact us at Garden Events.


Wish you'd saved them?

Are you missing an important issue of Texas Gardener? Or, perhaps, just tired of thumbing through stacks of back issues looking for the tips and techniques you need to make your garden grow? Two new CDs provide easy access to all six issues of volume 25 (November/December 2005 through September/October 2006) and volume 26 (November/December 2006 through September/October 2007)*.

$16.99 per CD includes tax and shipping

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  The newly revised Organic Manual, a natural addition to your gardening library

Around the world everyone is talking about environmental issues and the concept of "going green." Natural organic gardening and landscaping are among the most important parts of the movement. Some proponents only say to stop using chemicals. Howard Garrett, in the Organic Manual, explains in details what to do instead.

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Grow-Web encourages plant growth and development, and also provides protection from insects, birds, diseases and frosts. It is also air and water permeable and allows for ventilation. Grow-Web provides excellent protection to seedlings when applied directly to the seedbed.

$30.64 per 12.3' x 32.8' roll (includes shipping!)

Order by calling 1-800-727-9020. Not available through on-line bookstore.

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Grow-Web encourages plant growth and development, and also provides protection from insects, birds, diseases and frosts. It is also air and water permeable and allows for ventilation. Grow-Web provides excellent protection to seedlings when applied directly to the seedbed.

$30.64 per 12.3' x 32.8' roll (includes shipping!)

Order by calling 1-800-727-9020. Not available through on-line bookstore.

(Discover, MasterCard and Visa accepted.)



Texas Gardener's Seeds
is published weekly. © Suntex Communications, Inc. 2008. All rights reserved. You may forward this publication to your friends and colleagues if it is sent in its entirety. No individual part of this newsletter may be reproduced in any manner without prior written permission from the publisher.

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Publisher: Chris S. Corby Editor: Michael Bracken

Texas Gardener's Seeds, P.O. Box 9005, Waco, Texas 76714 ● www.TexasGardener.com