September 17, 2008ntBody" --> September 17, 2008ntBody" --> September 17, 2008

Welcome to Texas Gardener’s Seeds, the weekly newsletter for Texas gardeners. Please do not reply to this e-mail as the sending address is not monitored. See the bottom of this newsletter for information on how to subscribe, unsubscribe, or contact the editor.



 


 


 

Salad Garden
Let’s Get Portable

By Chris S. Corby
Editor/Publisher

Do you love fresh salads?  If so, don’t let cabin fever get you down because you are caught between seasons with no greens to harvest with nothing to do but wait by the fireplace for spring to come.  Instead, get out there and plant a portable salad garden.  With a little extra effort during those really cold blasts, you can have fresh salad greens all winter long—even if you don’t have a greenhouse.

Start by locating some suitable containers.  Those black vinyl pots left over from previous plant purchases are excellent.  The 1 to 5 gallon sizes seem to work best and the black plastic helps warm the soil and grow the plants.  Since your portable salad garden will probably need to be moved several times during the growing season, it is best to avoid the large, really heavy pots.

Select a good quality potting soil and add a generous amount of rotted manure (most salad crops like lettuce and spinach will really respond to the nitrogen in the manure).  There are also several very good premixed potting soils that contain slow release fertilizer that will work very well for growing containers of salad greens.

Once you have suitable containers located and filled with soil, place them in a tray full of water until the soil is saturated.  Then plant your seeds just as you would directly in the garden.  Place the containers in a warm sunny spot and keep them well watered, using the bottom watering technique to avoid washing the seeds and soil out of the container.  If feasible, continue to water using the trays or a drip line with emitters.

Lettuce and spinach are two of the most obvious choices for container salad gardens.  But you can really get creative if you wish.  Try planting Parris Island Cos (Romaine) or Rudy Red (leaf) ringed with radishes.  The radishes can be harvested in just a few weeks, allowing extraBe sure to thin plantings so the pots are not crowded.  These thinned out plants can be moved to additional containers or added to the salad bowl.  Most salad greens are better when harvested when slightly immature.  The Ruby Red and Lolla Rossa varieties are so beautiful in containers you may even be tempted to bring them indoors to brighten a gray winter day. 

Manure making a comeback:
Economics outweigh convenience when it comes to fertilizer

By Kay Ledbetter
Texas AgriLife Extension Service

Manure may not be as stable or spreadable as commercial fertilizer, but it is right on the price, a Texas AgriLife Extension Service specialist said.

“When we apply manure, it comes out in chunks and we don’t know the exact analysis,” said Dr. Sam Feagley, AgriLife Extension soil environmental specialist. “But now economics are overriding convenience, and producers even farther from feedyards are considering the benefits of applying manure.”

Feagley spoke at a recent feedyard manure educational meeting in Hereford. Attendees included farmers, crop consultants, feedyard managers and custom manure haulers.

“The agronomic value of manure has been known for a long time, and the organic content of manure provides many benefits to soils that cannot be obtained from commercial fertilizers alone,” Feagley said.

A bag of commercial fertilizer only provides what is listed on the bag, but manure will provide nitrogen, as well as phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, sulfur, iron, manganese, copper, zinc and all the other essential plant nutrients, he said.

“As fertilizer gets much more expensive, manure is a great value,” Feagley said. “Depending on the nutrients in the manure that you need, that value goes up. If you need phosphorus and potassium in addition to nitrogen, you add to the value.”

Feagley recommended producers meet the nitrogen needs of their crop when applying manure, and remember to take into account the mineralization rate. With mineralization, only about 45 percent of the nitrogen, 75 percent of the phosphorus and 90 percent of the potassium is available the first year, he said. An additional 5 to 10 percent is available the second year and another 3 to 5 percent the third year.

Fertilization rates recommended for two-bale-per-acre cotton are 100 pounds of nitrogen, 105 pounds of phosphorus and 120 pounds of potassium. The rates for 40- to 59-bushel-per-acre wheat are 120 pounds of nitrogen, 75 of phosphorus and 125 of potassium, assuming no nutrients are available to the crops, Feagley said.

During the meeting, Ben Weinheimer, Texas Cattle Feeders Association vice president, unveiled a new online Manure Value Calculator that can easily determine the economic value of manure compared to commercial fertilizer costs. To access the calculator, go to: http://www.tcfa.org/forms/ManureVsFert/manure_value_calculator.html.

In meeting the nitrogen needs and calculating manure application, Feagley said, producers need to be aware of how much extra phosphorus and potassium they are getting.

To avoid problems, producers need to apply manure at the needed nitrogen rate through the third year taking mineralization into account, he said. But after the third year, do not take mineralization into account and apply at the nitrogen rate every two or three years, supplementing with commercial fertilizer in years two and three.

Also, Feagley said, producers need to keep in mind any possible runoff into surface water bodies, such as a pond or stream, as the phosphorus has the potential to increase the eutrophication process.

Eutrophication is the natural weathering process of a surface water body. When additional nutrients, such as phosphorus, are increased in the water, then the extra nutrients can lead to overgrowth of plants and decreased dissolved oxygen in the water column.

“Know what you are getting with your manure,” he said.

Manure quality, while still not consistent, is better than in the past because feedyard owners know how to scrape the pens and get less dirt and cement, in the mix, he said. The inclusion of unwanted seeds, trash and soil, and its slow release of nutrients, are considered drawbacks.

However, the advantages to applying manure, Feagley said, are it maintains the organic matter and adds all essential plant nutrients to the soil. This helps the soil-air-water relationship, improves soil drainage and the plant-available water-holding capacity of the soil.

Manure is valued by comparing it to inorganic fertilizers, Feagley said. It is one-third to one-half as expensive as commercial fertilizer over a four-year period.

“Some producers are hauling it up to 20 miles, where three years ago haulers wouldn’t go more than five miles,” he said.


Gardening tips

Situate mailboxes on posts throughout your garden to store gardening tools, such as snips, spades, etc., so they will be handy. An old mailbox adds charm, but a new, white mailbox only costs about $20.

Judy Lott
Waxahachie

Have a favorite gardening tip you’d like to share? Texas Gardener’s Seeds is seeking brief gardening tips from Texas gardeners to use in future issues. If we publish your tip in Seeds, we will send you a free Texas Gardener T-shirt. Here’s a chance to get published and be a garden stylist as well! Please send your tips of 50 words or less to the editor at: Gardening Tips.


Did You Know...

Since wireworms attack potatoes, some old time gardening wisdom suggested scattering potato peels around the garden to trap the worms. For this to be effective, you should punch holes in several old tin cans, fill them with potato skins and then bury them near your potato plants. You will need to empty your cans once every week or so and fill with new skins as needed.


Upcoming garden events

Austin: The Travis County Master Gardeners Association, a volunteer arm of the Travis County AgriLife Extension Service, will present Vegetables for Cooler Times, a free seasonal seminar that will cover multiple topics pertinent to fall gardening activities from 7:00 p.m. until 9:00 p.m., Wednesday, September 17, Zilker Botanical Garden, 2220 Barton Springs Road, Austin. In spite of the heat, it is time to be in the vegetable garden. "Fall Vegetable Gardening" by Patty Leander, a regular contributor to Texas Gardener, will include the basics of vegetable gardening with the emphasis on plants and varieties that flourish in the fall and winter months. Leaves, leaves everywhere! Don’t rake, bag and send it to the landfill. Learn how to convert leaves and other material into plant food. It is called compost. Plants adore it. Learn how to make this magic act happen. Thought only Yankees could grow rhubarb? Wrong! With a little thinking outside the box, you can grow rhubarb and strawberries, too, right in your own backyard. Learn how these two favorites can be successfully in Central Texas. A Plant Clinic will be held during the entire seminar. Bring your diseased/bug eaten plant, roots and all, in a plastic bag. Gain knowledge from expert Master Gardeners on action you can take to remedy the situation. The seminar is free. No reservations will be taken. For more information, call (512) 854-9600 and ask for the Master Gardeners desk or visit http://www.tcmastergardeners.org.

Tomball: The Arbor Gate will host Coffee With Randy, An informal visit with KTRH’s Gardenline host, Thursday, September 18, from 10 a.m. until noon. GardenLine is where Houston’s Gardeners listen for expert advice on everything from aphids to zoysias. Randy is a Texas Aggie with a wealth of knowledge about gardening in Houston. For more information, call (281) 351-8851 or visit www.arborgate.com.

Sugar Land: The Sugar Land Garden Club will host the 10th annual Garden Art and Plant Sale on Saturday, September 20 from 8:30 a.m. until 1 p.m.at the Sugar Lakes Clubhouse, 930 Sugar Lakes Drive, Sugar Land. The sale will feature a number of new varieties of perennials and Texas Native plants (as well as many old favorites) from TreeSearch Farms. In addition, there will be seeds from member’s gardens, metal work, and a selection of garden art by talented local artists. Visit www.sugarlandgardenclub.org to preview some of the items that will be available at the sale. Proceeds from this and other Sugar Land Garden Club fundraisers are used within the community for the club’s scholarship grants and other programs.

Edna: The Jackson County Master Gardeners will have a Fall Plant Sale on Saturday, September 20, beginning at 8 a.m. in the Jackson County Services Building Auditorium, 411 N. Wells, Edna. Admission is free and open to the public. A variety of shrubs, flowering trees, vines and garden accessories will be on sale.

Tomball: The Arbor Gate will host NEW! Insects-Good Guys or Bad Guys?, led by Dee Howell, Houston Parks Department, Saturday, September 20, at 10 a.m. Believe it or not most insects are good guys. Dee will help you tell which is which and how to achieve a balance in your yard and garden. She will focus on using particular plants to attract beneficial insects. For more information, call (281) 351-8851 or visit www.arborgate.com.

Seabrook: Drop in on Harris County Master Gardeners Saturday, September 27 from 9 a.m. until noon for a "Fall Garden Expo" featuring free garden lectures and information booths combined with a sale of fruit trees, herbs, Earth Kind roses and fall vegetables. Information booths include: Herbs, Landscape Design, Ask a Master Gardener, Compost and Healthy Soil, Rainwater Harvesting, Tree and Shrub Care, Earth Kind Roses, Fire Ants and Insect Pests, and Micro-Irrigation. Landolt Pavilion at Clear Lake Park, 5001 NASA Road 1, Seabrook. For more information, call (281) 855-5600 or visit http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu.

The Woodlands: Discover the hottest trends in landscaping—habitat gardening, rainwater harvesting and organic methods—at Woodlands Landscaping Solutions on Saturday, September 27 from 9:00 a.m. to noon. The free, hands-on, how-to event offers sage tips for yard and garden with booths, demonstrations, pond and garden tours and a plant sale. Explore container gardening, learn design tips and get the dirt on composting. Purchase native perennials, vines, shrubs and understory trees from Diane Cabiness’s Native Plant Nursery and The Pineywoods Nursery. Rose Rustler’s will offer vintage roses for $10 a piece, and Montgomery County Herb Gardeners will spice things up with herbs for woodland gardens. Ceramics from Colored Umbrella Pottery, organic products and garden gifts also for sale. Free event hosted by Community Associations of The Woodlands at 8203 Millennium Forest Dr., The Woodlands. For more information, call (281) 210-3900 or visit www.thewoodlandsassociations.org/site/environment/default.aspx?page=382.

Rockport: The Aransas/San Patricio Master Gardener Association will hold a "Fall Plant Sale" Saturday, September 27, from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. at Green Acres, 611 East Mimosa Street at Pearl Street, Rockport. Purchase those much-wanted plants that you have been wanting to buy and can’t find anywhere. Be sure to take the time to wander through the demonstration gardens at Green Acres which are continuously being updated and maintained by the Aransas/San Patricio Master Gardener Association. This event is open to the public. For additional information, contact The Texas AgriLife Extension Service at (361) 790-0103.

Bryan: The Brazos County Master Gardener Association will hold a Fall Pant Sale at the Brazos County Extension Office, 2619 Highway 21 West, Bryan from 9 a.m. until noon on Saturday, September 27.The sale will include a wide selection of unusual and unique plants guaranteed to grow in Brazos County. Choice Heirloom and Pass-along plants from the gardens of local Master Gardeners will also be available for purchase. For additional information, call (979) 823-0129 or e-mail brazosmg@ag.tamu.edu.

Nacogdoches:The SFA Mast Arboretum will host its annual Fabulous Fall Festival on October 4, from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. at the SFA Intramural Fields on Wilson Drive. This event features the annual spring plant sale fundraiser benefiting the SFA Mast Arboretum, Pineywoods Native Plant Center, Ruby M. Mize Azalea Garden, and their educational programs. All of the plants are produced at SFA by the staff, students and volunteers. According to Dawn Stover, Mast Arboretum research associate, a wide variety of hard to find, “Texas tough” plants will be available including a truly eclectic mix of hard to find perennials, shrubs, and trees. The fall sale will feature a number of heat and drought resistant perennials that will thrive with little to no irrigation in East Texas. Also, new coneflower varieties, leopard plants, hardy gingers, and the outstanding varieties of ferns from recent trials will be available. As usual, gardeners will find a many wonderful plants suited for southern landscapes. Greg Grant, Pineywoods Native Plant Center research associate, points out that fall is the most appropriate time to plant trees, shrubs and perennials. A large variety of native shade trees as well as many other East Texas natives will be available. Some of Greg’s special introductions will be offered, including the large flowering ‘Helen Fredel’ crossvine and the brand new ‘Peppermint Flare’ rosemallow. Texas Gardeners are encouraged to arrive early, bring wagons and Greg and his volunteers will help fill them with a beautiful selection of plants. For more information and a list of plants for sale, call 936-468-4404, or visit http://arboretum.sfasu.edu and click on “Upcoming Events” .

Lewisville: The Denton County Master Gardeners’ 2008 Garden InfoFest will be held Saturday, October 4, from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. at Upper Trinity Regional Water District, 900 North Kealy Ave., Lewisville. Events include expert garden speakers, gardening demonstrations, Ask a Master Gardener booth, children’s activities, garden shopping, silent auction, plant sale, door prizes and a garden tour. For additional information, call (940) 349-2883 or visit DCMGA.com.

Tyler: The Smith County Master Gardener Association, a volunteer program of Texas AgriLife Extension Service, will sponsor its annual Fall Gardening Conference at Marvin United Methodist Church in Tyler on Saturday, October 11, from 8:30 a.m. until 11:15 a.m. A bulb sale following the conference at Harvey Convention Center will offer thousands of bulbs to the public with many varieties not often found in local nurseries. During the exposition, local Master Gardeners will provide a help-desk to answer gardening questions and perform demonstrations of proper bulb planting techniques, division of perennials, and planting of bare root roses. This conference and plant sale have continued to grow in popularity each succeeding year with attendees coming from as far as South Central Texas up to the Red River in the north and as far east as Louisiana. The conference is free and open to the public. Conference presentations by two recognized horticulture experts will provide useful insight and information about gardening in our region. Dr. William Welch, Professor and Landscape Horticulturist with the Department of Horticultural Sciences at Texas A&M University, will discuss gardening using perennials that thrive in the area and come back year after year. Chris Wiesinger, known as "the Bulb Hunter," is the owner of the Southern Bulb Company, a flower bulb farm in East Texas that offers heirloom perennial flower bulbs for warm climates. Chris regularly travels the back roads of Texas to rescue heirloom bulbs forgotten or destined for extinction due to developments and highway expansion. For additional information, call Texas AgriLife Extension Service, Smith County at (903) 590-2980.

Elm Mott (near Waco): World Hunger Relief will hold a Fall Farm Day, Saturday, October 18, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the farm. Live music, farm-fresh food, plants, seeds and grass fed meat plus demonstrations by local artisans will be offered. Lots of activities for the kids including pony rides, hayrides and more so bring the whole family and make a day of it. For more information call (254) 799-5611 or visit www.worldhungerrelief.org.

Fredericksburg: Texas Gourd Society will present the 13th annual "Lone Star Gourd Festival" at the Gillespie County Fairgrounds October 18 and 19. There will be door prizes, raffles, classes, demonstrations and an opportunity to meet Bill Decker, 2008 TGS Artist of the Year, and Bonnie Gibson, nationally-known author and artist. The show is open from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. Saturday and from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. on Sunday. Admission is $5 and free to children under 12. For additional information, call (806) 523-9092 or visit www.texasgourdsociety.org.

Austin: Plant and Insect Photography for Beginners class will be taught by Sam Myers, a Master Gardener and experienced photographer, from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m., Wednesday, October 22 at Zilker Botanical Garden, 2220 Barton Springs Road, Austin. The class will concentrate on developing the ability to take sharp, colorful photos with impact. There will be an overview of cameras, both film and digital. Discussion will include how lighting, focal length and aperture interact in composing photographs and how to use your camera’s programs (landscape, portrait, etc.) effectively. Guidelines of composition will be covered along with "posing" plants and insects for best visual presentation. Prerequisite: study the owner’s manual on your camera. Bring your camera for some practical exercises. Class size is limited. Reservation required: gisathccs@aol.com or (512) 804-2257. The class is sponsored by the Travis County Master Gardener Association in partnership with the AgriLife Extension, Travis County. For more information call (512) 854-9600 and ask for the Master Gardener’s desk. http://www.tcmastergardeners.org.

MONTHLY MEETINGS

Kilgore: Northeast Texas Organic Gardeners meets at 10 a.m. on the first Wednesday of each month at Wildwood Eco-Farm in Kilgore. For more information, call Carole Ramke at (903) 986-9475.

Allen: The Allen Garden Club meets on the first Thursday of each month at 7:30 p.m. at the little blue-gray house located at 102 N. Allen Dr., Allen. For more information, visit www.allengardenclub.org.

Austin: Austin Organic Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. on the second Monday of each month at the Zilker Botanical Gardens in Austin. For more information, visit www.main.org/aog.

Schertz: The Guadalupe County (Schertz/Seguin) Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas (NPSOT) meets the second Tuesday of each month at the Guadalupe County Annex, 1101 Elbel Road, Shertz. A plant exchange and meet-and-greet begins at 6:30 p.m. followed by a program at 7. For additional information or an application to join NPSOT, contact guadalupecounty@npsot.org.

Friendswood: The second Tuesday of each month the Harris County Precinct 2 Master Gardeners hold a free evening educational program for the public, called the Green Thumb Series, at Southeast Church of Christ, 2400 W Bay Area Blvd., Friendswood, about 1 mile west of I-45 and Baybrook Mall. For more information visit http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu or call (281) 991-8437.

Rockport: The Rockport Herb & Rose Study Group, founded in March 2003, meets the second Wednesday of each month, with the exceptions of June and July, to discuss all aspects of using and growing herbs, including historical uses and tips for successful propagation and cultivation, meets at 619 N. Live Oak Street, Room 14, Rockport at 10 a.m. Sometimes they take field trips and have cooking demonstrations in different locations. For more information, contact Linda (361) 729-6037, Ruth (361) 729-8923 or Cindy (979) 562-2153 or visit www.rockportherbs.com.

San Antonio: The San Antonio Herb Society meets at 7 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month at the San Antonio Garden Center, 3310 N. New Braunfels (corner of Funston & N. New Braunfels). For more information on programs, visit www.sanantonioherbs.org.

Dallas: The Rainbow Garden Club of North Texas meets the second Sunday of each month at 2 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Meetings are held at member’s homes and garden centers around the area. For more information, visit www.RainbowGardenClub.com.

Sugar Land: The Sugar Land Garden Club meets on the third Tuesday of each month, September through November and January through April at 10 a.m. at the Sugar Land Community Center, 226 Matlage Way, Sugar Land. The club hosts a different speaker each month. For more information, visit www.sugarlandgardenclub.org.

Denton: The Denton Organic Society, a group devoted to sharing information and educating the public regarding organic principles, meets the third Wednesday of each month (except July, August and December) at the Denton Senior Center, 509 N. Bell Avenue. Meetings are free and open to the public. Meetings begin at 7 p.m. and are preceded by a social at 6:30. For more information, call (940) 382-8551.

Houston: The Native Plant Society of Texas — Houston (NPSOT-H) meets at 7 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except for October (4th Thursday) and December (2nd Thursday). Location varies. For locations, for more information on programs, and for information about native plants for Houston, visit http://www.npsot.org/Houston.

Rosenberg: The Fort Bend Master Gardeners meet at 7:15 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except December at the Bud O’Shieles Community Center located at 1330 Band Road, Rosenberg. For more information, call (281) 341-7068 or visit www.fbmg.com.

Seguin: The Guadalupe County Master Gardeners meets the third Thursday of each month at the Texas AgriLife Extension Bldg. at 210 E. Live Oak at 7 p.m. For more information, phone (830) 379-1972 or visit www.guadalupecountymastergardeners.org.

Longview: The Northeast Texas chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets the third Thursday of each month at St. Mary’s Parish Hall in Longview. For more information, call Logan Damewood at (903) 295-1984.

Edna: The Jackson County Master Gardeners present their "Come Grown With Us" seminars on the fourth Tuesday of each month, January through October, beginning at 7 p.m. at 411 N. Wells, Edna. The seminars are free, open to the public and offer 2 CEU hours to Master Gardeners or others requiring them. For additional information, contact the Jackson County Extension Office at (361) 782-3312.

Fort Worth: The Organic Garden Club of Forth Worth meets at 7 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday of each month except July and December at the Fort Worth Botanic Gardens main building. Refreshments are served. For more information, call (817) 274-8460.

Seabrook: The Harris County Precinct 2 Master Gardeners hold an educational program at 10 a.m. on the fourth Wednesday of each month at The Meeting Room (on the Lakeside) at Clear Lake Park, 5001 NASA Road 1, Seabrook. The programs are free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu.

Dallas: The Dallas Organic Garden Club meets at 6:45 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of each month at the Fretz Park Recreation Center, located at the corner of Hillcrest and Beltline Road in Dallas. For more information, call (214) 824-2448 or visit www.dogc.org.

Arlington: The Arlington Organic Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the last Thursday of each month (except November and December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact David at (817) 483-7746.

If you would like your organization’s events included in "Upcoming Garden Events," please contact us at Garden Events. To ensure inclusion in this column, please provide complete details at least three weeks prior to the event.


Handmade all-occasion greeting cards — the cards that grow on you!

Cards are made of "plantable paper" (paper embedded with wildflower seeds). Plant in a pot or garden spot and watch it grow! The perfect gift for youngsters of all ages. Set includes six cards and envelopes.

$22.50 includes tax and shipping

Order by calling 1-800-727-9020.

(Discover, MasterCard and Visa accepted.)


Wish you’d saved them?

Are you missing an important issue of Texas Gardener? Or, perhaps, just tired of thumbing through stacks of back issues looking for the tips and techniques you need to make your garden grow? Three new CDs provide easy access to all six issues of volume 24 (November/December 2004 through September/October 2005), volume 25 (November/December 2005 through September/October 2006) and volume 26 (November/December 2006 through September/October 2007)*.

$16.99 per CD includes tax and shipping

Order by calling 1-800-727-9020.

(Discover, MasterCard and Visa accepted.)

*Other volumes will be available soon.


  Doug Welsh’s Texas Garden Almanac

Doug Welsh’s Texas Garden Almanac is a giant monthly calendar for the entire state — a practical, information-packed, month-by-month guide for gardeners and "yardeners." This book provides everything you need to know about flowers and garden design; trees, shrubs, and vines; lawns; vegetable, herb, and fruit gardening; and soil, mulch, water, pests, and plant care. It will help you to create beautiful, productive, healthy gardens and have fun doing it.

$26.63 plus shipping*

Order by calling 1-800-727-9020 or order on-line.

*Mention Texas Gardener’s Seeds when ordering by phone during the month of September and we’ll waive shipping charges. (Discover, MasterCard and Visa accepted.)


Fiber row cover valuable year-round

Grow-Web encourages plant growth and development, and also provides protection from insects, birds, diseases and frosts. It is also air and water permeable and allows for ventilation. Grow-Web provides excellent protection to seedlings when applied directly to the seedbed.

$30.64 per 12.3’ x 32.8’ roll (includes shipping!)

Order by calling 1-800-727-9020 or order on-line.

(Discover, MasterCard and Visa accepted.)



Texas Gardener’s Seedsize="4" color="#008000">Fiber row cover valuable year-round

Grow-Web encourages plant growth and development, and also provides protection from insects, birds, diseases and frosts. It is also air and water permeable and allows for ventilation. Grow-Web provides excellent protection to seedlings when applied directly to the seedbed.

$30.64 per 12.3’ x 32.8’ roll (includes shipping!)

Order by calling 1-800-727-9020 or order on-line.

(Discover, MasterCard and Visa accepted.)



Texas Gardener’s SeedstentBody" -->


Texas Gardener’s Seedsize="4" color="#008000">Fiber row cover valuable year-round

Grow-Web encourages plant growth and development, and also provides protection from insects, birds, diseases and frosts. It is also air and water permeable and allows for ventilation. Grow-Web provides excellent protection to seedlings when applied directly to the seedbed.

$30.64 per 12.3’ x 32.8’ roll (includes shipping!)

Order by calling 1-800-727-9020 or order on-line.

(Discover, MasterCard and Visa accepted.)



Texas Gardener’s Seeds>


Texas Gardener’s SeedstentBody" -->


Texas Gardener’s Seedsize="4" color="#008000">Fiber row cover valuable year-round

Grow-Web encourages plant growth and development, and also provides protection from insects, birds, diseases and frosts. It is also air and water permeable and allows for ventilation. Grow-Web provides excellent protection to seedlings when applied directly to the seedbed.

$30.64 per 12.3’ x 32.8’ roll (includes shipping!)

Order by calling 1-800-727-9020 or order on-line.

(Discover, MasterCard and Visa accepted.)



Texas Gardener’s Seeds
is published weekly. © Suntex Communications, Inc. 2008. All rights reserved. You may forward this publication to your friends and colleagues if it is sent in its entirety. No individual part of this newsletter may be reproduced in any manner without prior written permission from the publisher.

Missed an issue? Back issues of Texas Gardener’s Seeds are available at www.texasgardener.com/newsletters.

Publisher: Chris S. Corby Editor: Michael Bracken

Texas Gardener’s Seeds, P.O. Box 9005, Waco, Texas 76714 ● www.TexasGardener.com