August 26, 2009

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Dr. Dariusz Malinowski shows off his wall of hibiscus plants that are producing flowers varying in size, shape and color. Some flowers have reached the size of dinner plates and others are taking on the characteristics of tropical flowers, but remain winter hardy. (Texas AgriLife Research photo by Kay Ledbetter)


This hibiscus was selected for unusual color combination. (Texas AgriLife Research photo by Dr. Dariusz Malinowski)


This raspberry-colored hibiscus was selected for both its unusual spider pedal shape and for its color. (Texas AgriLife Research photo by Dr. Dariusz Malinowski)


This particular cross was selected for the large flowers it produces. This flower measures 8 inches in diameter. (Texas AgriLife Research photo by Dr. Dariusz Malinowski)

Unique winter-hardy hibiscus has roots with AgriLife Research scientist in Vernon

By Kay Ledbetter
Texas AgriLife Extension Service

He may study grasses by profession, but Texas AgriLife Research forage agronomist Dr. Dariusz Malinowski has a passion for flowers, particularly winter hardy hibiscus.

And it is that passion that has created his latest research project — propagating unique winter-hardy hibiscus.

Malinowski said he's very much a grass and forage researcher, but this falls in line with his master's degree in horticulture.

"I like the hardy hibiscus and have been crossing them for four years," he said. "I started getting crosses that were unique in my yard."

A collaboration of Steve Brown, Texas Foundation Seed Service program director, and Malinowski determined commercialization of the flowers would fit in AgriLife Research's effort to work with non-traditional or under-utilized crops that have value because of drought tolerance.

The hardy hibiscus also is a great candidate because it is a carefree plant. It doesn't have to be watered once it gets established, it is low maintenance and has little disease or insect pressure, he said.

To date, Malinowski has produced about 500 crosses. From that number, he has planted about 150 of them around the Vernon area in yards of fellow researchers and at the Texas Foundation Seed facilities.

Only about 25 percent to 30 percent of those have bloomed so far, but 12 have exceptional qualities, Malinowski said.

"The hardy hibiscus found on the market are primarily white, red and pink and are mostly of the same size and shape," he said. "I'm trying to give them diversity, with some spider-type petals, and some new colors, such as lavender, and combinations of colors."

Brown said this research is really another example of how plant-improvement programs at AgriLife Research extend beyond what most think as conventional crops.

The nursery and greenhouse industry in Texas is a $2 billion industry, Brown said.

The green industry has a $13.5 billion financial impact on the state, according to the Texas Nursery and Landscape Association.

"This research touches not only the producers of agricultural products but most homeowners and consumers throughout the state," Brown said. "We'll be working with some of our corporate programs to look at public/private partnerships as we do with other things."

Malinowski said he has gathered many native hibiscus and already-released cultivars, and he is crossing them to accumulate the traits that he prefers in the plants.

He is cross-pollinating the flowers by hand. If successful, a fruit will develop at the bottom of the stem within three days, he said.

"Now it depends on how fast we can propagate them," Malinowski said. A new cultivar can't be propagated from a seed. The new, promising lines must be propagated from cuttings.

"That's the only way we are able to multiply each unique plant that we have now," Malinowski said. "It's not an easy task. We are experimenting with different variables."

He said being able to do tissue cultures in a lab, as the commercial industry does, would be much faster.

Brown said vegetative propagation is the only way to make sure the new plant looks exactly like the selection that the cutting comes from rather than having a segregating population or differing plants, which occurs when seed is planted from a cross between two different plants.

The hibiscus can basically be grown from San Antonio north to Canada, as long as the required winter period is long enough for them to go dormant after the first frost, Malinowski said. The plants resprout from the root the following spring.

Malinowski said he believes the new crosses will be sold as potted plants and can be planted in yards. They will begin to bloom when the night is short, around late June, and continue flowering all season long until a frost.

He also is trying to develop dwarf plants with huge flowers for patios and smaller gardens.

Brown said it could be three years from the time commercially acceptable selections are made before Malinowski's propagations could be available in a nursery or retail outlet.

Timing for the market will require some greenhouse work, Brown said. Cuttings must be taken in the fall or early spring and put into a greenhouse to increase the numbers. In early spring, rooted plants will need to be exposed to extended day-lengths and elevated temperatures to change the timing of the bloom.

"If we get 60 to 100 mother plants, then at that point we would license it to a commercial greenhouse or nursery to expand it from there," he said.>

"Then they will do cuttings and greenhouse day-length adjustments and so forth to multiply the variety to the retail strength needed," Brown said.

He said to target the flowering-plant market in retail and garden stores, they will try to get the plants to bloom in early June, rather than July, "because typically consumers want to see a budding plant, not a picture of what they are buying."


 

The Compost Heap
Mistletoe and tea bags

"I read, enjoy and appreciate the service that Texas Gardener's Seeds extends to the public and I read Texas Gardener regularly," writes Nancy Furth. "I am amazed to read a short article about the the propagation of mistletoe ("Did You Know," Seeds, August 19, 2009). How can encouraging the spread of a parasitic plant that is damaging to trees be deemed a sound or good horticultural practice? Having been an advocate and student of Extension-based information for many years, I fail to see the merit in passing along such information."

Thanks for your comments and concern. The article you referenced was not intended to encourage the spread of mistletoe, only to point out how it could be propagated if someone wanted to grow some for sale or for use as a holiday decoration. Doing so would not necessarily widen the spread of this parasitic plant since the seed is spread primarily by birds. Besides, there is so much mistletoe growing in Texas, most folks will just pick what they need rather than grow it.

Your point is well taken, though, and we appreciate your continued interest in Seeds and Texas Gardener.--Chris Corby, Publisher 

"I use the entire tea bag at the bottom of planters/pots," writes Debbi Harris, referring to "Gardening Tips," Seeds, August 19, 2009. "By using the entire bag intact, it allows the soil and water to not filter through as quickly. Banana peels go directly into planters with a couple of inches of soil below and above. All plants seems to love it."


 

Gardening tips

"In addition to picking my tomatoes when they only have a blush of red," writes Beverly Nord, "I finally figured out another way not to loose as many tomatoes to marauding critters. Instead of pulling the half-eaten tomato off the vine, leave it there. The critter will come back to it until it is gone instead of starting on a new one. Won't stop them, but slows them down a tiny bit."

Have a favorite gardening tip you’d like to share? Texas Gardener’s Seeds is seeking brief gardening tips from Texas gardeners to use in future issues. If we publish your tip in Seeds, we will send you a free copy of Texas Gardener's 2009 Planning Guide & Calendar. Please send your tips of 50 words or less to the editor at: Gardening Tips.

Did You Know...

Systemic pesticides are absorbed by the plant so that any part of the plant — leaves, roots, stems contain lethal amounts of the pesticide — enough to effectively control the targeted pest. Consequently, plants that are treated with systemic pesticides should not be consumed by humans. Systemics should never be applied to vegetable, fruit or nut crops or any plant that may be consumed by humans.


Upcoming garden events

Tomball: The Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball, will present "Gardening to Maximize Your Nutrition" at 10 a.m., Saturday, August 29. Learn which herbs, vegetables, and fruits can provide the biggest nutritional boost to your diet, with Ann Mahon, Nutritionist. Gunters Heirloom Vegetables will also be on hand. For additional information, call (281) 351-8851 or visit www.arborgate.com.

San Antonio: The San Antonio Botanical Society is bringing David Rogers' Big Bugs to the San Antonio Botanical Garden, 555 Funston at North New Braunfels Ave., this fall. The exhibit opens Labor Day weekend (September 5-7), and will remain on location through December 6. Featuring gargantuan sculptures of insects, the exhibit alters viewers' perceptions and magnifies the role of insects as nature's "hidden gardeners." Sculptures are constructed entirely from natural materials, complementing and blending with the existing landscape. Interactive programs for children and families, and integrated materials for educators, will be available at the Garden throughout the three-month exhibit. For more information, call (210) 207-3255, or visit www.sabot.org.

Pearland: Jeannie Dunihoo, Harris County and Chambers Master Gardener, will present a program on herbs as part of the Harris County Master Gardener Association's Green Thumb Gardening Series, from 6:30 p.m. until 9 p.m., Tuesday, September 8, at Bass Pro Shops, Highway 288 at the Sam Houston Tollway, Pearland. Admission is free and open to the public. For additional information, visit http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu.

The Woodlands: Greg Grant — renowned horticulturalist, native plant pioneer, gardening author and Texas Gardener columnist — shares gardening wit and wisdom on Thursday, September 10 at 7:30 p.m. in the presentation, Gardening for the Birds and the Bees: Saving the World One Garden at a Time. Sponsored by Community Associations of The Woodlands, the free program will be held in the L.G.I. Lecture Hall at McCullough Jr. High, 3800 S. Panther Creek Dr. For information, call (281) 210-3900 or visit www.thewoodlandsassociations.org/site/environment/default.aspx?page=355.

Tomball: The Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball, will present "Light Your Landscape" at 10 a.m., Thursday, September 10. Experience the beauty and enjoyment of landscape lighting with Rob Greening, NiteLites Lighting Company. For additional information, call (281) 351-8851 or visit www.arborgate.com.

Kingsland: The Kingsland Garden Club will present “Gardening with Deer” by Llano County AgriLife Agent Jamie Osborne beginning a 1:15 p.m., Friday, September 11, at the Kingsland Library, 125 Polk St., Kingsland. For more information, visit http://yantislakesidegardens.giving.officelive.com/kgc.aspx.

Austin: The Travis County Master Gardeners Association will present "Redesigning Your Gardens," from 1 p.m. until 3 p.m., Saturday, September 12, at the Old Quarry Branch, Austin Public Library, 7051 Village Center Drive, Austin (off Far West Blvd.). The seminar is free and requires no reservations. For additional information, call (512) 854-9600 or visit www.tcmastergardeners.org.

Tomball: The Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball, will present "Light Your Landscape" at 10 a.m., Saturday, September 12. Experience the beauty and enjoyment of landscape lighting with Rob Greening, NiteLites Lighting Company. For additional information, call (281) 351-8851 or visit www.arborgate.com.

Victoria: The Victoria County Master Gardener Association fall plant sale will be held September 12 from 8 a.m. until 2 p.m., or sellout, whichever occurs first. The sale will be held at the Victoria County 4-H Activity Center, 259 Bachelor Dr., Victoria Regional Airport, Victoria. Proceeds will go to VCMGA Victoria Educational Gardens. For additional information, contact rlees1126@aol.com.

Glen Rose: The Somervell County Master Gardeners Association will host a program on "Fire Ants" presented by Josh Blanek, CEA Ag/NR, Somervell County, at 6:30 p.m. September 14 at the Somervell County Citizens Center, 209 S.W. Barnard, Glen Rose. For additional information, call (254) 897-2809 or visit www.somervellmastergardeners.org.

Seabrook: Dr. Carol Brouwer, County Extension Agent for Horticulture will speak about fall vegetable gardening as part of the Harris County Master Gardener Association's Master Gardener Lecture Series, beginning at 10 a.m., September 16, at The Meeting Room at Clear Lake Park (on the lakeside), 5001 NASA Road 1, Seabrook. For additional information, visit http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu.

Austin: The Travis County Master Gardeners Association will present "Do-It-Yourself Pond Building," from 10 a.m. until noon, Saturday, September 19, at American Botanical Council, 6200 Manor Road, Austin. There is no charge for the seminar, but seating is limited. To register or for additional information, call (512) 854-9600 or visit www.tcmastergardeners.org.

Granbury: The Lake Granbury Master Gardeners and Tarleton Langdon Center presenting The Fall Market at the Langdon Center, 300 East Pearl, Granbury, from 8 a.m. until 2 p.m., September 19. There will be crafts, plants, booths, lectures, and a children's workshop. Steve Huddleson, author of Easy Gardens for North Central Texas, will be signing his book. For additional information, visit http://www.hoodcountymastergardeners.org.

The Woodlands: Offering sage tips for yard and garden, Woodlands Landscaping Solutions spotlights water-wise, earth-friendly methods with booths, demonstrations and a native plant sale on Saturday, September 26 from 9 a.m. to noon at 8203 Millennium Forest Dr. Debuting the garden's rainwater harvesting and drip-irrigation system, highlights also include container gardening; how-to care for gardening tools; and a vintage rose sale by Texas Rose Rustlers. The hands-on, how-to gardening event is a free program of Community Associations of The Woodlands. For information, call (281) 210-3900 or visit www.thewoodlandsassociations.org/site/environment/default.aspx?page=382.

Austin: The Travis County Master Gardeners Association will present "For the Love of Trees," from 1 p.m. until 3 p.m., Saturday, October 10, at the Old Quarry Branch, Austin Public Library, 7051 Village Center Drive, Austin (off Far West Blvd.). The seminar is free and requires no reservations. For additional information, call (512) 854-9600 or visit www.tcmastergardeners.org.

Huntsville: Walker County Master Gardeners' will hold their Fall Plant Sale on Saturday, October 10 from 8 a.m. until 2 p.m. at the Master Gardeners Greenhouse located north of Huntsville on the corner of Highway 75 N. and TAM Road (102 TAM Rd.) approximately 2 miles north of the Pilot Truck Stop. Bring your wagon, your gardening and landscaping ideas and load up with fall vegetable transplants, herbs, daylilies, daffodil/narcissus bulbs, Texas natives and perennials, hard-to-find pass-along plants, fruit trees, blackberries, blueberries and much more. Many of these selections won't be found at the "big box" stores. If the 100+ heat relents, we may have fresh, seasonal produce. Come early and shop the Country Store for gardening shoes/boots, gloves, hats, books, tools. Refreshments will be available. Proceeds will be used to benefit Master Gardener community activities and educational projects including scholarships for high school grads planning to major in horticulture or environmental science. For more information, call (936) 435-2426 or visit www.walkercountymastergardener.org/.

Waco: Texas State Technical College and The World Hunger Relief Organization have teamed up to teach you how to garden more successfully in a pair of two-day gardening workshops. The he second workshop will be held from 8 a.m. until noon, October 10 and 17. Registration for the two-day workshop is $96, and is limited to 15 participants. To register, or for additional information, contact Melissa Curtis at (254) 867-3113.

Arlington & Fort Worth: The Garden Conservancy’s Open Days Program — Tour of Private Gardens in Arlington & Fort Worth will take place from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m., Sunday, October 11. Enjoy a self-guided tour of six private gardens. No reservations required; rain or shine. Cost: $5 per garden; children under 12 free. A portion of the proceeds collected will be shared with the Tarrant County Master Gardeners. For more information, visit www.opendaysprogram.org or call The Garden Conservancy toll-free weekdays, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST, 1-888-842-2442. For descriptions of participating gardens, visit http://www.gardenconservancy.org/opendays/events.pl?ID=255&SortBy=&State=.

Austin: Learn how to install one type of drip irrigation system, Friday, October 16, 9 a.m. until 11 a.m. at the Demonstration Garden at Travis County AgriLife Extension Office, 1600 "B" Smith Rd., Austin. This is a hands-on demonstration, so you can help with construction or just watch. This free event is sponsored by the Travis County Master Gardeners Association. For additional information, call (512) 854-9600 or visit www.tcmastergardeners.org.

Fredericksburg: The Texas Gourd Society presents the 14th Annual Lone Star Gourd Festival, October 16 through 18, at the Gillespie County Fairgrounds, 530 Fair Dr., Fredericksburg. The festival will be open from 1 p.m. until 6 p.m., Friday; 9 a.m. until 6 p.m., Saturday; and 10 a.m. until 4 p.m., Sunday. Admission is $5 for adults; children 12 and under free. For additional information, visit www.TexasGourdSociety.org.

Tyler: The Smith County Master Gardener Association, will sponsor its annual Fall Gardening Conference at Harvey Hall in Tyler, Saturday, October 17, from 9:00 a.m. until 11:30 a.m. A bulb and plant sale following the conference will offer thousands of bulbs to the public with many varieties not often found in local nurseries. The sale runs from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. During the exposition local Master Gardeners will provide a help-desk to answer gardening questions and perform demonstrations for the attendees. Admission to both the Gardening Conference and the Plant Expo is free. For additional information, call Texas AgriLife Extension Service, Smith County (903) 590 2980.

Chambersville/Farmer's Branch/McKinney: Celebrate roses at the second annual RoseDango in Chambersville, Farmer's Branch and McKinney, October 17 and 18. RoseDango features guest speakers Marilyn Wellan and Stephen Scanniello, this year's Great Rosarians of the World (GROW) honorees, as well as Mike Shoup of the Antique Rose Emporium and Dennis Jones, President of the Fort Worth Rose Society. For additional information visit www.RoseDango.com.

New Braunfels: Applications are now being accepted for the fall 2009-2010 class of the Lindheimer Chapter of the Texas Master Naturalists. The Master Naturalist program is a natural resource-based volunteer training and development program jointly sponsored statewide by the Texas AgriLife Extension Service and Texas Parks & Wildlife. The mission of the program is to develop a corps of well-informed volunteers who provide education and service dedicated to the beneficial management of the natural resources and natural areas within their communities for the state of Texas. The Lindheimer Chapter in Comal County offers a course every year to train new Master Naturalists to be knowledgeable about the nature and wildlife of the Texas Hill Country and to assist in education and volunteer missions. The fall class begins with an orientation on October 26 from 6:00 until 9:00 p.m. Curriculum consists of 12 classes, held the first Tuesday of each month beginning November 3, from 6 p.m. until 9 pm. Curriculum includes 36 hours in the classroom taught by subject matter experts from a wide range of natural resource disciplines. In addition, 40 hours of volunteer work, and eight hours of advanced training qualifies trainees for certification as a Master Naturalist. Training is conducted at the AgriLife Extension Service, Comal County, at 325 Resource Drive, New Braufels, located behind the Comal County Recycling Center on Texas 46 West. Applications will be accepted through October 19 and are available at http://comal-co.tamu.edu by clicking on “Comal Master Naturalists”; at the Texas AgriLife Extension Service, 325 Resource Drive, New Braunfels; or at the Lindheimer Chapter Web site at http://grovesite.com/tamu/lc. Tuition is $120.00 and includes course materials. The class is limited to 20 students. For additional information, call the AgriLife Extension Service (830) 620-3440.

Dallas: The Garden Conservancy’s Open Days Program – Tour of Private Gardens in Dallas will take place from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m., Sunday, October 24. Enjoy a self-guided tour of five private gardens. No reservations required; rain or shine. Cost: $5 per garden; children under 12 free. For more information, visit www.opendaysprogram.org or call The Garden Conservancy toll-free weekdays, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST, 1-888-842-2442. For descriptions of participating gardens, visit http://www.gardenconservancy.org/opendays/events.pl?ID=255&SortBy=&State=.

Austin: Learn which bulb varieties are best for the Austin area, Friday, October 30, 9 a.m. until 11 a.m. at the Demonstration Garden at Travis County AgriLife Extension Office, 1600 "B" Smith Rd., Austin. Learn bulb requirements and planting methods to enhance your success with bulbs. This is a hands-on event. This free event is sponsored by the Travis County Master Gardeners Association. For additional information, call (512) 854-9600 or visit www.tcmastergardeners.org.

Austin: "Limestone & Water" — Four garden design experts share their experience with innovative design in a hot climate from 8:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m., Saturday, October 31, at Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, 4801 La Crosse Avenue, Austin. Seminar speakers include Stephen Orr, Scott Ogden and Lauren Springer Ogden, and Dylan Crain Robertson. Co-sponsored by the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, University of Texas at Austin. Cost: $75 general admission; $65 Garden Conservancy/Wildflower Center members; $40 students. To register, visit www.gardenconservancy.org or call The Garden Conservancy’s West Coast Program Office, 415-441-4300. For more information, visit http://www.gardenconservancy.org/events.pl?ID=285.

Waco: World Hunger Relief, Inc., will host its Fall Farm Day Festival from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m., Saturday, November 7, at 356 Spring Lake Road, Waco. There will be farm-fresh food, tours of the farm, hayrides and demonstrations. Plants, grass-fed meat and seeds will be available for sale. Directions: From Waco, go north of I-35. Take Exit 342B and follow the signs to World Hunger Relief Farm. For additional information, call (254) 799-5611 or email info@worldhungerrelief.org.

MONTHLY MEETINGS

Rockport: The Aransas/San Patricio Master Gardeners meets at 9 a.m. the first Tuesday of each month at the AgriLife Extension Office - Aransas County, 611 E. Mimosa, Rockport. For additional information, e-mail aransas-tx@tamu.edu or call (361) 790-0103.

Kilgore: Northeast Texas Organic Gardeners meets at 10 a.m. on the first Wednesday of each month at Wildwood Eco-Farm in Kilgore. For more information, call Carole Ramke at (903) 986-9475.

Allen: The Allen Garden Club meets at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month, February through December, at the Allen Heritage Center, 100 E. Main St., Allen. For more information, visit www.allengardenclub.org.

Austin: Austin Organic Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. on the second Monday of each month at the Zilker Botanical Gardens in Austin. For more information, visit www.main.org/aog.

Pearland: The second Tuesday of each month the Harris County Precinct 2 Master Gardeners hold a free evening educational program for the public, called the Green Thumb Series, at Bass Pro Shop, Highway 288 at Sam Houston Tollway, Pearland. For more information visit http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu or call (281) 991-8437.

Schertz: The Guadalupe County (Schertz/Seguin) Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas (NPSOT) meets the second Tuesday of each month except July and August at the library, 798 Schertz Parkway, Shertz. A plant exchange and meet-and-greet begins at 6:30 p.m. followed by a program at 7 p.m. For additional information or an application to join NPSOT, contact guadalupecounty@npsot.org.

Rockport: The Rockport Herb & Rose Study Group, founded in March 2003, meets the second Wednesday of each month, with the exceptions of June and July, to discuss all aspects of using and growing herbs, including historical uses and tips for successful propagation and cultivation, meets at 619 N. Live Oak Street, Room 14, Rockport at 10 a.m. Sometimes they take field trips and have cooking demonstrations in different locations. For more information, contact Linda (361) 729-6037, Ruth (361) 729-8923 or Cindy (979) 562-2153 or visit www.rockportherbs.com.

Beaumont: The Jefferson County Master Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the AgriLife Extension Office, 1225 Pearl Street, Suite 200, Beaumont. For more information, call (409) 835-8461.

Brownwood: Brown County Master Gardeners Association meets the second Thursday of each month, from Noon to 1 p.m., at the Brown County AgriLife Extension Office, 605 Fisk, Brownwood. For additional information, call Freda Day (325) 643-1077, or Mary Engle (325) 784-8453.

Georgetown: The Williamson County Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the Georgetown Public Library, 402 W. 8th Street. Georgetown. For additional information, contract Billye Adams at (512) 863-9636 or visit http://www.npsot.org/WilliamsonCounty/default.htm.

San Antonio: The San Antonio Herb Society meets at 7 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month at the San Antonio Garden Center, 3310 N. New Braunfels (corner of Funston & N. New Braunfels). For more information on programs, visit www.sanantonioherbs.org.

College Station: The A&M Garden Club meets on the second Friday of each month during the school year at 9:30 a.m. at the Senior Circle Rooms, College Station Professional Building II, 1651 Rock Prairie Road, College Station. Expert speakers, plant sharing, and federated club projects help members learn about gardening in the Brazos Valley, floral design, conservation topics, and more. For more information, visit www.sallysfamilyplace.com/Clubs/GardenClub.htm.

Dallas: The Rainbow Garden Club of North Texas meets the second Sunday of each month at 2 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Meetings are held at member’s homes and garden centers around the area. For more information, visit www.RainbowGardenClub.com.

Cleburne: The Johnson County Master Gardener Association meets at 6 p.m. on the third Monday of each month. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program each month preceding the business meeting. For information on topics call (817) 556-6370 or visit http://www.jcmga.org/.

Sugar Land: The Sugar Land Garden Club meets on the third Tuesday of each month, September through November and January through April at 10 a.m. at the Sugar Land Community Center, 226 Matlage Way, Sugar Land. The club hosts a different speaker each month. For more information, visit www.sugarlandgardenclub.org.

Denton: The Denton Organic Society, a group devoted to sharing information and educating the public regarding organic principles, meets the third Wednesday of each month (except July, August and December) at the Denton Senior Center, 509 N. Bell Avenue. Meetings are free and open to the public. Meetings begin at 7 p.m. and are preceded by a social at 6:30. For more information, call (940) 382-8551.

Glen Rose: The Somervell County Master Gardeners meet at 10 a.m., the third Wednesday of each month at the Somervell County AgriLife Extension office, 1405 Texas Drive, Glen Rose. Visitors are welcome. For more information, call (254) 897-2809 or visit www.somervellmastergardener.org.

Granbury: The Lake Granbury Master Gardeners meet at 1 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at the Hood County Annex 1, 1410 West Pearl Street, Granbury. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program each month preceding the business meeting. For information on topics call (817) 579-3280 or visit http://www.hoodcountymastergardeners.org/.

Seabrook: The Harris County Precinct 2 Master Gardeners hold an educational program at 10 a.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at The Meeting Room at Clear Lake Park (on the Lakeside), 5001 NASA Road 1, Seabrook. The programs are free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu.

Houston: The Native Plant Society of Texas — Houston (NPSOT-H) meets at 7 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except for October (4th Thursday) and December (2nd Thursday). Location varies. For locations, for more information on programs, and for information about native plants for Houston, visit http://www.npsot.org/Houston.

Rosenberg: The Fort Bend Master Gardeners meet at 7:15 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except December at the Bud O’Shieles Community Center located at 1330 Band Road, Rosenberg. For more information, call (281) 341-7068 or visit www.fbmg.com.

Seguin: The Guadalupe County Master Gardeners meets the third Thursday of each month at the Texas AgriLife Extension Bldg. at 210 E. Live Oak at 7 p.m. For more information, phone (830) 379-1972 or visit www.guadalupecountymastergardeners.org.

Edna: The Jackson County Master Gardeners present their "Come Grown With Us" seminars on the fourth Tuesday of each month, January through October, beginning at 7 p.m. at 411 N. Wells, Edna. The seminars are free, open to the public and offer 2 CEU hours to Master Gardeners or others requiring them. For additional information, contact the Jackson County Extension Office at (361) 782-3312.

Fort Worth: The Organic Garden Club of Forth Worth meets at 7 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday of each month except July and December at the Fort Worth Botanic Gardens main building. Refreshments are served. For more information, call (817) 274-8460.

Dallas: The Dallas Organic Garden Club meets at 6:45 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of each month at the Fretz Park Recreation Center, located at the corner of Hillcrest and Beltline Road in Dallas. For more information, call (214) 824-2448 or visit www.dogc.org.

Arlington: The Arlington Organic Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the last Thursday of each month (except November and December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact David at (817) 483-7746.

If you would like your organization’s events included in "Upcoming Garden Events," please contact us at Garden Events. To ensure inclusion in this column, please provide complete details at least three weeks prior to the event.


Lone Star Wildflowers:
A Guide to Texas Flowering Plants

By LaShara J. Neiland and Willa F. Finley

Each spring throughout the celebrated Hill Country and well beyond, locals and visitors revel in the palettes and variety of Texas wildflowers. From the Panhandle canyonlands to the islands of South Texas, from the eastern Pineywoods to the farthest reaches of the arid Trans-Pecos, some 5,000 species dot Texas's 268,820 square miles. Now Lone Star Wildflowers offers easy identification through color grouping and a wealth of insight from the origin of scientific and common names to growth cycles, uses, history, and native lore.

Nieland and Finley have made countless forays with camera and notebook and have broadened their approach through years of research. In language accessible to every enthusiast, they offer wildflower lovers unparalleled enrichment.

$37.22 includes tax and shipping

Order online with credit card at www.texasgardener.com or call toll-free 1-800-727-9020.

Visa, MasterCard and Discover accepted.


Wish you’d saved them?

Are you missing an important issue of Texas Gardener? Or, perhaps, just tired of thumbing through stacks of back issues looking for the tips and techniques you need to make your garden grow? These new CDs provide easy access to all six issues of
volume 21 (November/December 2001 through September/October 2002),
volume 22
(November/December 2002 through September/October 2003),
volume 23
(November/December 2003 through September/October 2004),
volume 24 (November/December 2004 through September/October 2005),
volume 25 (November/December 2005 through September/October 2006),
volume 26 (November/December 2006 through September/October 2007),
volume 27 (November/December 2007 through September/October 2008) and
volume 28 (November/December 2008 through September/October 2009)*.

$16.99 per CD includes tax and shipping

Order by calling 1-800-727-9020.

(Discover, MasterCard and Visa accepted.)

*Other volumes will be available soon.


Doug Welsh’s Texas Garden Almanac

Doug Welsh’s Texas Garden Almanac is a giant monthly calendar for the entire state — a practical, information-packed, month-by-month guide for gardeners and "yardeners." This book provides everything you need to know about flowers and garden design; trees, shrubs, and vines; lawns; vegetable, herb, and fruit gardening; and soil, mulch, water, pests, and plant care. It will help you to create beautiful, productive, healthy gardens and have fun doing it.

$26.63 plus shipping*

Order by calling 1-800-727-9020 or order on-line.

*Mention Texas Gardener’s Seeds when ordering by phone and we’ll waive shipping charges. (Discover, MasterCard and Visa accepted.)


Fiber row cover valuable year-round

Grow-Web encourages plant growth and development, and also provides protection from insects, birds, diseases and frosts. It is also air and water permeable and allows for ventilation. Grow-Web provides excellent protection to seedlings when applied directly to the seedbed.

$30.64 per 12.3’ x 32.8’ roll (includes shipping!)

Order by calling 1-800-727-9020 or order on-line.

(Discover, MasterCard and Visa accepted.)



Texas Gardener’s Seeds
is published weekly. © Suntex Communications, Inc. 2009. All rights reserved. You may forward this publication to your friends and colleagues if it is sent in its entirety. No individual part of this newsletter may be reproduced in any manner without prior written permission from the publisher.

Missed an issue? Back issues of Texas Gardener’s Seeds are available at www.texasgardener.com/newsletters.

Publisher: Chris S. Corby Editor: Michael Bracken

Texas Gardener’s Seeds, P.O. Box 9005, Waco, Texas 76714 ● www.TexasGardener.com