October 13, 2010

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Satsuma Miho, a 2010 Texas Superstar, is cold hardy and produces superior fruit, said a Texas AgriLife Extension Service horticulturist. (Texas AgriLife Extension Service photo)

Satsuma Miho mandarins tolerate -14 degrees Fahrenheit

By Robert Burns
Texas AgriLife Extension Service

Not to be uppity, but just because a plant is favored by oriental royalty doesn't necessarily mean it's good enough to be a Texas Superstar, said a Texas AgriLife Extension Service expert.

Satsuma Miho mandarins are one of the five new Texas Superstars for 2010, said Dr. Larry Stein, AgriLife Extension horticulturist. After rigorous testing, horticulturists with Texas AgriLife research and AgriLife Extension designate plants as Texas Superstars that are not just beautiful but perform well for Texas consumers and growers.

"They're highly prized in Japan," Stein said. "But we were looking for a more cold-hardy variety with very good quality."

Many satsuma mandarin varieties do well under Texas conditions, and satsumas were promoted as Texas Superstars as a group in 1993.

"But we never promoted a specific variety, not until now," he said.

What changed Satsuma Miho's status? Years of further testing, Stein said. The previous recommendations for satsumas, at least as container plants or patio plants, was that they be brought indoors if temperatures threatened to drop below 25 degrees Fahrenheit, which is still a good idea for the first few years of the tree's life. Also, many of the satsumas required being grafted onto a hardier rootstock, and the Texas Superstar team wanted something easier to grow.

In 1994, AgriLife Extension and AgriLife Research horticulturists planted several satsuma varieties — Miho, Seto, Okistu and Kimbrough — under identical conditions at the Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Center at Uvalde. They used two-year-old container-grown plants that had either been grown on their own roots or grafted to sour orange rootstock.

For winters of 1996 and 1997, the trees were protected from freezing temperatures using dry cedar mulch.

"The entire trees were covered these two years," Stein said.

In 1998, to test cold-hardiness, the trees were left uncovered and a low of -8.9 Celsius (about 16 degrees Fahrenheit) was recorded. Stein said the trees lost some leaves but for the most part, their wood was undamaged.

In January 1999, temperatures dropped to -6.9 Celsius (about 20 degrees Fahrenheit) and again there was no damage to the wood.

Both the Seto and Miho produced high quality fruit, but the team eventually chose Miho as a 2010 Texas Superstar.

"Not only was it a very high quality fruit, but it also rooted quite readily from cuttings," Stein said. "It tends to root best and grow off best (of any of the tested varieties)."

Mature budded Miho trees are small to medium size, from about 10-12 feet tall with a spread of from 13-15 feet wide. Trees grown on their own roots are generally about two-thirds the size of budded trees, he said.

"The color of Miho fruit develops in late summer and early fall; the peel is smooth and thin and leathery," Stein and his colleague, Dr. Jerry Parsons, retired AgriLife Extension horticulturist, wrote in their official report. "Fruit has been allowed to hang until early December ... but should be harvested around or just before Thanksgiving."

Though Satsuma Miho is technically a small tree, it can be grown in a container. The tree's size is further dwarfed when it is containerized, Stein said.

He also noted that many people lose their patio citrus trees in the first or second year of the tree's life, and though larger trees have withstood temperatures in the teens without damage, it's a good idea to roll the containerized tree indoors when temperatures are apt to drop to 25 degrees or below.

More information on the history, care, propagation of Satsuma Miho and other patio citrus varieties can be found at http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/patiocitrus/.

Texas Superstar is a registered trademark owned by Texas AgriLife Research, an agency of the Texas A&M System.


One bad apple can spoil the whole state: Tropical Soda Apple

By Buddy Gough
The Nature Conservancy of Texas

Kudzu, hyacinth and bufflegrass are bad enough, but other tough and terrible plants are marching on Texas, not the least of which is the innocuous sounding “tropical soda apple.”

A thorny plant that makes bull nettle look tame, the invader from South America first took hold in Florida, and has been spreading rapidly across the southeastern states towards Louisiana and Texas. Now, the Conservancy and other concerned landowners are on the alert for the troublesome invasive species in the sultry environment of the upper coastal plain.

At a casual glance, the tropical soda apple appears as a green, bushy shrub growing three to six feet tall with large, lobed leaves showing hairy surfaces. Closer inspection reveals stems rife with thorns up to an inch long. Most telltale on the mature plants are “apples” resembling tiny green watermelons about 1.5 inches in diameter that ripen to a bright yellow.

The ripe, seed-filled fruit emits a sweet smell that attracts wildlife and livestock, which consume the fruit and spread the highly viable seeds. With each plant capable of producing 50,000 seeds, the tropical soda apple can spread rapidly across open, semi-shaded areas such as pastures, drainages, roadsides and recreation areas.

Wherever it takes hold, it can quickly reduce the biological diversity of natural areas by displacing native plants. In agricultural areas, it can restrict livestock grazing and carry a host of viruses that can infect vegetable crops. It also contains chemical called “solasodine,” which is poisonous to humans.

Such pernicious characteristics have placed the plant on the Federal Noxious Weed List and led the U.S. Forest Service and Natural Resources Conservation Commission to put out an alert to farmers, ranchers and anyone with a stake in the integrity of natural environments.

If or when the tropical soda apple invades Texas, repelling it will involve a long and laborious process, according to the eradication methods recommended by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

In small areas of scattered plants, the individual plants should either be uprooted or sprayed with herbicide. If the plants have mature fruits, they need to uprooted and moved to be destroyed in a safe location. Since roots can regenerate, the infested sites need to be monitored for one to two years.

Dense widespread stands require a regime of repeated mowing and herbicide applications from spring to fall, with the process likely to be necessary for two to three years.

While the gloves are off in attacking the plant, actual gloves should be worn at all time when handling it.

First, it has to be detected, and it’s getting closer all the time.

For more information about The Nature Conservancy's work in Texas, including other invasive species we help control, visit nature.org/texas.


The Compost Heap
Half-told story

"Your gardening tips only told half of the story ('Gardening tips,' Seeds, October 6, 2010)," writes Bob Hatton. "If you put tulips or other bulbs in the vegetable bin of your refrigerator and there are other (and there are many that qualify) fruits and veggies that give off ethylene gas, the flowers will be deformed at best and non-existent at worst."


Gardening tips

"On the southeast side of my house I have a 3-foot-wide garden bed," writes Edwin Smith. "It gets too hot in the summer to grow much in this bed. I put a thick layer of grass clippings on it for the summer. I water and let nature take its course. I uncover it in the fall and plant my salad garden. It works great."

Have a favorite gardening tip you’d like to share? Texas Gardener’s Seeds is seeking brief gardening tips from Texas gardeners to use in future issues. If we publish your tip in Seeds, we will send you a free Texas Gardener hat. Please send your tips of 50 words or less to the editor at: Gardening Tips.


Did You Know...

The fig is one of the oldest fruit crops grown by man and a popular home fruit crop in Texas. In the early 1900s there was a 17,000 acre fig growing and processing industry on the Texas Gulf Coast.


Upcoming garden events.

If you would like your organization’s events included in "Upcoming Garden Events" or would like to make a change to a listed event, please contact us at Garden Events. To ensure inclusion in this column, please provide complete details at least three weeks prior to the event.

San Antonio: Farmers, ranchers, and others attending the San Antonio International Farm and Ranch Show at the Expo Hall on the Freeman Coliseum grounds, 3201 East Houston Street, San Antonio, October 14-16, will have the opportunity to learn how to use the Web Soil Survey (WSS) at the 1 p.m. educational track on Thursday., October 14. Attendees can also receive a free hands-on demonstration on how to map the soils on their land using the free online program at the USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) booth during the course of the show. NRCS specialists will also be on hand to visit with landowners about the technical and financial assistance programs, available without a fee, through NRCS, to help them meet their land management goals. For more information on the San Antonio International Farm and Ranch Show International Farm and Ranch Show website at http://www.farmandranchexpo.com.

Conroe: The Montgomery County Master Gardeners Fall Plant Sale will be Saturday, October 16, from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. From 8 a.m. until 9 a.m., County Horticultural Agent Tom LeRoy will present a program on the plants we being sold. The sale will be at 9020 Airport Road (formerly FM 1484), Conroe. For more information, call 936-539-7824 or visit montgomerycountymastergardeners.org.

Livingston: Fall in Texas is the perfect time to plant herbs. At 6:30 p.m., Tuesday, October 19, join a discussion on what herbs to grow, how to grow them and how to use them at the Polk County AgriLife Extension meeting room, 602 E. Church St., Livingston. For more information, call 936-566-4170.

New Braunfels: The 2010-2011 class of the Lindheimer Chapter of Texas Master Naturalists is soliciting applications for its 2010 fall class, which begins with an orientation on Monday, October 25. Classes start on November 2 for 12 consecutive months and meet the first Tuesday of each month from 6 p.m. until 9 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Service Office, 325 Resource Dr, New Braunfels (behind the Comal County Recycling Center). Visit http://txmn.org/lindheimer for the application or contact the AgriLife Extension Service office at 830 620-3440 for program information. Applications are due to AgriLife Extension Service by October 11.

Pearland: The Harris County Master Gardener Association will present a program about tree care from 6:30 p.m. until 9 p.m. Tuesday, October 12, at Bass Pro Shops, Highway 288 at the San Houston Tollway, Pearland. This lecture is free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu.

Houston: HUG (Houston Urban Gardeners) will meet Wednesday, October 13, at 6:30 p.m. at the Houston Garden Center, 1500 Hermann Dr. in Hermann Park, Houston (713-284-1989). Carol Brouwer, Ph.D., with AgriLife will discuss What To Plant and Do Now. Be prepared to meet and network with like-minded people. Free and open to the public. Visit www.houstonurbangardeners.org for more information.

Georgetown: The Williamson County Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas will meet at 7 p.m., Thursday, October 14, at the Georgetown Public Library, 2nd floor, 402 W 8th St., Georgetown. Stephen Brueggerhoff will present "The Heath Family from Coast to Coast: Recollections and Relations from Washington to Texas." Visitors welcome. For additional information, contact Susan Waitz at 512-948-5241 or visit http://www.npsot.org/WilliamsonCounty/default.htm.

Austin: The Garden Conservancy's Open Days Program takes place Saturday, October 16, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Explore six private gardens open to the public in Austin, to benefit The Garden Conservancy. No reservations required; rain or shine. Special highlights include water running down limestone stairs, an organic habitat with intensive hardscaping, an Italian-inspired fish pond, clipped hedges and topiary forms, and panoramic views of downtown Austin, Lake Austin, and Shoal Creek. Visitors may begin at any of the following locations: James deGrey David & Gary Peese Garden, 8 Sugar Creek Drive; East Side Patch, 1172-1/2 San Bernard; Garden of Deborah Hornickel, 3206 Oakmont Boulevard; Jones Residence, 3211 Stratford Hills Lane; Pemberton Heights Courtyard Garden, 2401 Pemberton Place; or Utility Research Garden, 638 Tillery Street. Cost: $5 per garden, or a $25 day pass for all six gardens, available at each location; children under 12 free. For more information, visit www.opendaysprogram.org or call The Garden Conservancy toll-free weekdays, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST, 1-888-842-2442.

Brownwood: Brownwood Area Community Garden celebrates its first Harvest Festival Saturday, October 16, in conjunction with World Food Day, from 10 to 4, at the beautiful Riverside Park in Brownwood. Events include a Vegetarian Chili Cookoff; Pumpkin Pie Bakeoff; Punkin' Paintin' for Kids; Oscar the Grouch Trashcan Veggie Roast; bounce house, jack o'lantern face painting, vendors, and music. For vendor applications, chili cookoff and pumpkin pie bakeoff entries, call 325-784-8453, email bac_garden@yahoo.com, or write PO Box 1062, Brownwood, TX 76804.

Bryan: The Brazos County Master Gardener Association will host a seminar on Rainwater Harvesting from 9 a.m. until 11:30 a.m., Saturday, October 16, at The Brazos Center, Bryan. For additional information, visit brazosmg.com.

Farmers Branch and Chambersville: The third annual RoseDango is set to celebrate the ultimate landscape plant October 16 and 17 in the Rose Gardens of Farmers Branch and the Chambersville Heritage Rose Garden. These two undiscovered garden gems located in the Dallas Metroplex will host this two-day festival. While Rosie is the official hostess, the event will appeal to all gardeners and plant enthusiasts as many different educational opportunities and entertainment venues are offered. This year the event will include a bluegrass festival and wine tastings spotlighting local vineyards. For additional information, visit www.rosedango.com or call 972-919-2625.

Victoria: The Victoria County Master Gardener Association will hold its 2010 Victoria Garden Tour featuring five locations October 16 and 17. A night tour will be held on October 16. For ticket and location information, call the Victoria AgriLife Extension Office at 361-575-4581.

Seabrook: Dr. William Johnson, County Extension Agent for Galveston County, will present "Year-round Care of the Landscape" at 10 a.m., October 20, at The Meeting Room at Clear Lake Park (on the lakeside), 5001 NASA Road 1, Seabrook. Johnson will discuss when and how to accomplish major tasks and what not to do in the landscape. This lecture is free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu.

Wimberley: The Hill Country Unit of the Herb Society of America is hosting an Herb Celebration Luncheon on Friday, October 22, from 10 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. at the Wimberley Presbyterian Church, 956 FM 2325, Wimberley. Rita Heikenfeld will speak on Herbs of the Bible and Their Uses. Lunch, silent auction, herbs and herbal crafts will be available. Tickets are $18. For reservations, contact Linda McDowell at 512 847-7987 or lindamcdwll@yahoo.com.

San Antonio: The Garden Conservancy's Open Days Program takes place Saturday, October 23, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Explore six private gardens open to the public in San Antonio, to benefit The Garden Conservancy and the Gardening Volunteers of South Texas. No reservations required; rain or shine. Visit website for complete garden description and driving directions. Special highlights include countless container plantings, a walled tropical garden, a pair of Balinese Rain Goddess statues, a “Walden-esque” pond, a cabana with a moon-viewing roof, as well as deer-resistant and Texas native plants. Visitors may begin at any of the following locations: Clowe Garden, 717 Ridgemont Avenue; Mrs. McNay’s Hermitage – 1930s Walled Moorish Garden, 206 Joliet Avenue; Inter-City Walden Pond Garden, 610 Bluff Post; Kargl Garden, 143 Wildrose Avenue; Oak Canyon Garden, 201 Lariat Road; or the Ramos Garden, 9 Kelian Court in Elm Creek. Cost: $5 per garden, or a $25 day pass for all six gardens, available at each location; children under 12 free. For more information, visit www.opendaysprogram.org or call The Garden Conservancy toll-free weekdays, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST, 1-888-842-2442.

Austin: “Caring for Your Trees” will be presented Saturday, October 30, 1 p.m. until 3 p.m., at the Yarborough Public Library, 2200 Hancock Dr., Austin. Join Austin’s City Arborist, Michael Embesi, to learn about the benefits of trees, the urban forest, and why trees are an essential part of our lives. Learn to select appropriate trees for Central Texas landscapes, those that are appropriate for native soils and tough climate. Understand how to select and care for the right tree, in the proper location, considering size, longevity, and biological needs. Finally, hear about opportunities within multiple community programs, including grant opportunities, which promote the urban forest. This seminar is free and open to the public. It is presented by the Travis County Master Gardeners, a volunteer arm of the Texas AgriLife Extension Service in Travis County. For more information, visit www.tcmastergardeners.org.

Kemah: The Kemah-Bay Area Garden Club will hold its next meeting at 9:30 a.m., Wednesday, November 3, at the Jimmie Walker Community Center, 800 Harris Avenue, Kemah. The program will be "Flowers and Waterdrops," a painting presentation by Liz Pearsall, artist/owner of Windale Studios in La Porte. Light refreshments will be served and the public is invited. For additional information, call Annience Larkins, president, at 281-842-9008.

Marble Falls: Thinking about having purple martins this spring? Join Master Gardener Robert Yantis November 4 for a "Living with Purple Martins." Purple martins are the only birds that depend on humans for their housing. Learn about taking care of and enjoying our beautiful springtime visitors at a program presented by the Highland Lakes Birding and Wildflower Society in Marble Falls at the Marble Falls Public Library at 9:30 a.m. See upcoming gardening events at http://yantislakesidegardens.giving.officelive.com/events.aspx.

Kingsland: Learn the techniques for taking beautiful pictures of plants and wildlife in your garden in a program presented free by the Kingsland Garden Club. Master Naturalist and expert photographer Marvin Bloomquist will give you tips on "Photography in Your Garden" Friday, November 5, at the Kingsland Library. The meeting begins at 1 pm., and the program starts at 1:45 pm. For more information, call 325-388-8849.

Burnet: Learn helpful tricks to having a successful Hill Country garden with "Tips on Hill Country Gardening" with Master Gardener, Master Naturalist and author Bill Luedecke. This is a free Green Thumb Program presented by the Master Gardeners at 10:30 a.m., Saturday, November 6, at the Burnet Library. Shop before and after at the Master Gardeners Farmers Market on the Square across from the library in downtown Burnet.

Pearland: The Harris County Master Gardener Association will present a program about soils and composting from 6:30 p.m. until 9 p.m. Tuesday, November 9, at Bass Pro Shops, Highway 288 at the San Houston Tollway, Pearland. This lecture is free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu.

Georgetown: The Williamson County Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas will meet at 7 p.m., Thursday, November 11, at the Georgetown Public Library, 2nd floor, 402 W 8th St., Georgetown. Visitors welcome. For additional information, contact Susan Waitz at 512-948-5241 or visit http://www.npsot.org/WilliamsonCounty/default.htm.

Austin: “Growing Culinary Herbs in Texas” will be presented Saturday, November 13, from 10 a.m. until noon, at the American Botanical Council, 6200 Manor Rd., Austin. Herbs are a delight to the senses and an easy way to add beauty to your landscape! This class will cover the basics of growing both seasonal and perennial culinary herbs in central Texas, and will offer some suggestions for their use. Class size is limited, so sign up early by calling the Master Gardener Help Desk at 512-854-9600. This seminar is free and open to the public. It is presented by the Travis County Master Gardeners, a volunteer arm of the Texas AgriLife Extension Service in Travis County. For more information, visit www.tcmastergardeners.org or call the Travis County Master Gardener's help desk at 512-854-9600.

Seabrook: Dr. Anthony Camerino, County Extension Agent, Texas AgriLife Extension, Harris County, will answer the question, "What Is Organic Gardening" at 10 a.m., November 17, at The Meeting Room at Clear Lake Park (on the lakeside), 5001 NASA Road 1, Seabrook. Johnson will discuss when and how to accomplish major tasks and what not to do in the landscape. This lecture is free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu.

Houston: Considering all the rain and flooding that Harris County gets — with or without tropical storms — one wouldn't think that rainwater harvesting would be a hot topic. But rainwater harvesting is a good fit for wet areas as well as dry. "There's quite a bit of interest in rainwater harvesting in Harris County," said Justin Mechell, AgriLife Extension water resources specialist. "They have a lot of rainfall, so there's a lot to capture. And also they're irrigating quite a bit of land, so there's a big need and great potential for capturing that water; it provides a good opportunity." To respond to that growing interest, AgriLife Extension will offer a one-day training in collecting and using rainwater on November 18 at the AgriLife Extension office in Harris County, 3033 Bear Creek Drive, Houston. The training has been designed primarily for professional landscapers, but the public is welcome, Mechell said. Pre-registration for the course is $125; same-day registration will be $150. A 90-percent refund will be given to those who pre-register but have to cancel. Registration includes a manual with more than 200 pages written by AgriLife Extension engineers and rainwater harvesting experts. Lunch will be provided. Registration will start at 8:30 a.m., with the presentation beginning at 9 a.m. First up will be a "big-picture" overview of rainwater harvesting methods used throughout the state, including their sustainability and economics. "Sizing of Rainwater Harvesting System Components" will review the basic components of a rainwater harvesting system, including information on how to size a storage tank, cover designs and pipe systems. After lunch, "Methods to Improve Stored Water Quality" will cover selecting roofing materials, gutter screening, first-flush diversion design, basket screens, connection of multiple tanks and dealing with overflows. In "Treatment of Harvested Water," AgriLife engineers will explain what kind of treatment is needed for collected water depending on its use, potable or non-potable use. The session titled "Maintenance" will cover maintenance of filtering and disinfection devices, as well as tanks, gutters and rooftops. The training will end with an opportunity for participants to review, evaluate and ask questions. To register, go to the AgriLife Extension conference services website at https://agrilifevents.tamu.edu and search for "rainwater." Alternately, participants may call 979-845-2604 to register. For more information, Mechell can be reached at 979-845-1395 or JKMechell@ag.tamu.edu.

Georgetown: The Williamson County Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas will meet at 7 p.m., Thursday, December 9, at the Georgetown Public Library, 2nd floor. There will be a silent auction and potluck dinner. Visitors welcome. For additional information, contact Susan Waitz at 512-948-5241 or visit http://www.npsot.org/WilliamsonCounty/default.htm.

Georgetown: The Williamson County Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas will meet at 7 p.m., Thursday, January 13, at the Georgetown Public Library, 2nd floor. Ginger Hudson will present her new book Landscape Maintenance for Central Texas Gardens. Visitors welcome. For additional information, contact Susan Waitz at 512-948-5241 or visit http://www.npsot.org/WilliamsonCounty/default.htm.

New Braunfels: Registration has begun for the Comal Master Gardener Training Class which will be held from January 19 to May 11, 2011. Applications for the class are currently on the Comal Master Gardener website at http://www.txmg.org/comal/ or contact the Texas AgriLife Extension Service office at 830-620-3440 for more information. Class size is limited and applications are accepted in the order they are received. The class will meet each Wednesday afternoon from 1:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the Texas AgriLife Extension Service Comal County Office, 325 Resource Dr., New Braunfels (behind the Comal County Recycling Center).

MONTHLY MEETINGS

Houston: The Harris County Master Gardeners meet at noon the first Tuesday of each month at the Texas AgriLife Extension, 3033 Bear Creek Drive (near the intersection of Highway 6 and Patterson Road), Houston. For additional information visit http://hcmga.tamu.edu or call 281-855-5600.

Rockport: The Aransas/San Patricio Master Gardeners meets at 9 a.m. the first Tuesday of each month at the AgriLife Extension Office - Aransas County, 611 E. Mimosa, Rockport. For additional information, e-mail aransas-tx@tamu.edu or call 361-790-0103.

Kilgore: Northeast Texas Organic Gardeners meets at 10 a.m. on the first Wednesday of each month at Wildwood Eco-Farm in Kilgore. For more information, call Carole Ramke at 903-986-9475.

Allen: The Allen Garden Club meets at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month, February through December, at the Allen Heritage Center, 100 E. Main St., Allen. For more information, visit www.allengardenclub.org.

Austin: Austin Organic Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. on the second Monday of each month at the Zilker Botanical Gardens in Austin. For more information, visit www.main.org/aog.

Marion: The Guadalupe County (Schertz/Seguin) Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets on the second Tuesday of each month except July and August at The Library, 500 Bulldog, Marion. There is a plant exchange and meet-and-greet begins at 6:30 p.m. followed by the program at 7 p.m. Visitors are welcome. For more information or an application to join NPSOT visit www.npsot.org/GuadalupeCounty/ or contact contact guadalupecounty@npsot.org.

Pearland: The second Tuesday of each month the Harris County Precinct 2 Master Gardeners hold a free evening educational program for the public, called the Green Thumb Series, at Bass Pro Shop, Highway 288 at Sam Houston Tollway, Pearland. For more information visit http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu or call 281-991-8437.

Rockport: The Rockport Herb & Rose Study Group, founded in March 2003, meets the second Wednesday of each month, with the exceptions of June and July, to discuss all aspects of using and growing herbs, including historical uses and tips for successful propagation and cultivation, meets at 619 N. Live Oak Street, Room 14, Rockport at 10 a.m. Sometimes they take field trips and have cooking demonstrations in different locations. For more information, contact Linda 361-729-6037, Ruth 361-729-8923 or Cindy 979-562-2153 or visit www.rockportherbs.com.

Beaumont: The Jefferson County Master Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the AgriLife Extension Office, 1225 Pearl Street, Suite 200, Beaumont. For more information, call 409-835-8461.

Brownwood: Brown County Master Gardeners Association meets the second Thursday of each month, from Noon to 1 p.m., at the Brown County AgriLife Extension Office, 605 Fisk, Brownwood. For additional information, call Freda Day 325-643-1077, or Mary Engle 325-784-8453.

Georgetown: The Williamson County Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the Georgetown Public Library, 402 W. 8th Street. Georgetown. For additional information, contract Billye Adams at 512-863-9636 or visit http://www.npsot.org/WilliamsonCounty/default.htm.

Orange: The Orange County Master Gardeners meet at the Salvation Army in Orange on the second Thursday of each month. A covered-dish dinner at 6:30 p.m. is followed by a speaker and business meeting at 7 p.m.

San Antonio: The San Antonio Herb Society meets at 7 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month at the San Antonio Garden Center, 3310 N. New Braunfels (corner of Funston & N. New Braunfels). For more information on programs, visit www.sanantonioherbs.org.

Dallas: The Rainbow Garden Club of North Texas meets the second Sunday of each month at 2 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Meetings are held at member’s homes and garden centers around the area. For more information, visit www.RainbowGardenClub.com.

Arlington: The Arlington Men's Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the third Monday of each month (except December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact Lance Jepson at LJepson@aol.com.

Cleburne: The Johnson County Master Gardeners meet the third Monday of each month at McGregor house on the corner of West Henderson and Colonial Dr. in Cleburne. A program starts at 6 p.m., followed by a meet-and-greet with refreshments and a short business meeting. For information visit http://www.jcmga.org/.

Sugar Land: The Sugar Land Garden Club meets on the third Tuesday of each month, September through November and January through April at 10 a.m. at the Sugar Land Community Center, 226 Matlage Way, Sugar Land. The club hosts a different speaker each month. For more information, visit www.sugarlandgardenclub.org.

Denton: The Denton Organic Society, a group devoted to sharing information and educating the public regarding organic principles, meets the third Wednesday of each month (except July, August and December) at the Denton Senior Center, 509 N. Bell Avenue. Meetings are free and open to the public. Meetings begin at 7 p.m. and are preceded by a social at 6:30. For more information, call 940-382-8551.

Glen Rose: The Somervell County Master Gardeners meet at 10 a.m., the third Wednesday of each month at the Somervell County AgriLife Extension office, 1405 Texas Drive, Glen Rose. Visitors are welcome. For more information, call 254-897-2809 or visit www.somervellmastergardeners.org.

Granbury: The Lake Granbury Master Gardeners meet at 1 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at the Hood County Annex 1, 1410 West Pearl Street, Granbury. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program each month preceding the business meeting. For information on topics call 817-579-3280 or visit http://www.hoodcountymastergardeners.org/.

Seabrook: The Harris County Precinct 2 Master Gardeners hold an educational program at 10 a.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at The Meeting Room at Clear Lake Park (on the Lakeside), 5001 NASA Road 1, Seabrook. The programs are free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu.

Houston: The Native Plant Society of Texas — Houston (NPSOT-H) meets at 7 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except for October (4th Thursday) and December (2nd Thursday). Location varies. For locations, for more information on programs, and for information about native plants for Houston, visit http://www.npsot.org/Houston.

Rosenberg: The Fort Bend Master Gardeners meet at 7:00 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except December at the Bud O’Shieles Community Center located at 1330 Band Road, Rosenberg. For more information, call 281-341-7068 or visit www.fbmg.com.

Seguin: The Guadalupe County Master Gardeners meets at 7 p.m. the third Thursday of each month, except December, at the Texas AgriLife Extension Bldg. at 210 E. Live Oak, Seguin. An educational program precedes the business meeting. The public is invited to attend. For topic or other information, call 830-379-1972 or visit www.guadalupecountymastergardeners.org.

Atlanta: The Caddo Wildflower Chapter of Native Plants Society meets the fourth Tuesday of each month at the Horne Enterprise building in Atlanta at 7 p.m. Visitors are welcome. For additional information, contact Kay Lowery at frostkay268@aol.com.

Brackenridge Park: The Native Plant Society San Antonio Chapter meets every fourth Tuesday of each month at 7:00 p.m. in the Lions Field Adult and Senior Center, 2809 Broadway at E. Mulberry, Brackenridge Park, except August and December. Social and seed/plant exchange at 6:30 p.m. Free and open to the public. For more information, contact Bea at 210-999-7292 or visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio.

Edna: The Jackson County Master Gardeners present their "Come Grown With Us" seminars on the fourth Tuesday of each month, January through October, beginning at 7 p.m. at 411 N. Wells, Edna. The seminars are free, open to the public and offer 2 CEU hours to Master Gardeners or others requiring them. For additional information, contact the Jackson County Extension Office at 361-782-3312.

Fort Worth: The Organic Garden Club of Forth Worth meets at 7 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday of each month except July and December at the Fort Worth Botanic Gardens main building. Refreshments are served. For more information, call 817-274-8460.

San Antonio: The Native Plant Society of Texas San Antonio Chapter meets the fourth Tuesday of the month, except August and December, at the Lions Field Adult & Senior Center, 2809 Broadway, San Antonio. Social and plant/seed exchange at 6:30 p.m., program at 7:00 p.m. For more information, visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio or call Bea at 210-999-7292.

Dallas: The Dallas Organic Garden Club meets at 2:30 p.m. on the fourth Sunday of each month at the North Haven Gardens, 7700 Northaven Rd., Dallas. For more information, call 214-824-2448 or visit www.dogc.org.

Arlington: The Arlington Organic Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the last Thursday of each month (except November and December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact David at 817) 483-7746.


In Greg's Garden:
A Pineywoods Perspective on Gardening, Nature and Family

An intimate and personal exploration of the life of one of Texas’s most beloved gardeners, In Greg’s Garden: A Pineywoods Perspective on Gardening, Nature and Family gathers in a single volume the first nine years of Greg Grant’s columns from Texas Gardener magazine.

Revised and updated from their original publication, these 54 essays reveal the heart and soul of a seventh generation native Texan who has devoted his entire life to gardening, nature and family. With degrees in floriculture and horticulture from Texas A&M University and extensive hands-on experience as a horticulturist with the Texas Agricultural Extension Service, Stephen F. Austin State University, Mercer Arboretum and San Antonio Botanical Gardens, Grant has successfully introduced dozens of plants to the Texas nursery industry, all while maintaining long-held family property and renovating the homes of his ancestors in Arcadia, Texas.

In Greg’s Garden: A Pineywoods Perspective on Gardening, Nature and Family is a must-read for every Texas gardener.

Available only for Kindle. Order directly from Amazon by clicking here.


Texas Wildscapes:
Gardening for Wildlife

By Kelly Conrad Bender

NEW EDITION of the popular Texas Parks & Wildlife book, now with fully searchable DVD containing all the plant and animal information you need to customizTexas Wildscapes program provides the tools you need to make ahome for all the animals that will thrive in the native habitat you create.

In Texas Wildscapes, Kelly Conrad Bender identifies the kinds of animals you can expect when you give them their three basic needs: food, water, and shelter. She then provides guidelines for designing and planting your yard or garden to best provide these requirements for the many birds, mammals, reptiles, amphibians, and invertebrates the environment will attract.

$31.88 includes tax and shipping

Order online with credit card at www.texasgardener.com or call toll-free 1-800-727-9020.

Visa, MasterCard and Discover accepted.


Wish you'd saved them?

Are you missing an important issue of Texas Gardener? Or, perhaps, just tired of thumbing through stacks of back issues looking for the tips and techniques you need to make your garden grow? These new CDs provide easy access to all six issues of
volume 20 (November/December 2000 through September/October 2001),
volume 21
(November/December 2001 through September/October 2002),
volume 22
(November/December 2002 through September/October 2003),
volume 23
(November/December 2003 through September/October 2004),
volume 24 (November/December 2004 through September/October 2005),
volume 25 (November/December 2005 through September/October 2006),
volume 26 (November/December 2006 through September/October 2007),
volume 27 (November/December 2007 through September/October 2008),
volume 28 (November/December 2008 through September/October 2009) and
volume 29 (November/December 2009 through September/October 2010)*.

$16.99 per CD includes tax and shipping

Order by calling 1-800-727-9020.

(Discover, MasterCard and Visa accepted.)

*Other volumes will be available soon.


Doug Welsh's Texas Garden Almanac

Doug Welsh’s Texas Garden Almanac is a giant monthly calendar for the entire state — a practical, information-packed, month-by-month guide for gardeners and "yardeners." This book provides everything you need to know about flowers and garden design; trees, shrubs, and vines; lawns; vegetable, herb, and fruit gardening; and soil, mulch, water, pests, and plant care. It will help you to create beautiful, productive, healthy gardens and have fun doing it.

$26.63 plus shipping*

Order by calling 1-800-727-9020 or order on-line.

*Mention Texas Gardener’s Seeds when ordering by phone and we’ll waive shipping charges. (Discover, MasterCard and Visa accepted.)


Fiber row cover valuable year-round

Grow-Web encourages plant growth and development, and also provides protection from insects, birds, diseases and frosts. It is also air and water permeable and allows for ventilation. Grow-Web provides excellent protection to seedlings when applied directly to the seedbed.

$30.64 per 12.3’ x 32.8’ roll (includes shipping!)

Order by calling 1-800-727-9020 or order on-line.

(Discover, MasterCard and Visa accepted.)


Become a Texas Gardener fan on Facebook

Become a fan of Texas Gardener magazine on Facebook. See what we're up to at http://www.facebook.com/pages/Texas-Gardener-Magazine/301356291835?ref=nf.


Texas Gardener’s Seeds is published weekly. © Suntex Communications, Inc. 2010. All rights reserved. You may forward this publication to your friends and colleagues if it is sent in its entirety. No individual part of this newsletter may be reproduced in any manner without prior written permission from the publisher.

Missed an issue? Back issues of Texas Gardener’s Seeds are available at www.texasgardener.com/newsletters.

Publisher: Chris S. Corby ● Editor: Michael Bracken

Texas Gardener’s Seeds, P.O. Box 9005, Waco, Texas 76714 ● www.TexasGardener.com