May 18, 2011

Welcome to Texas Gardener’s Seeds, the weekly newsletter for Texas gardeners. Please do not reply to this e-mail because the sending address is not monitored. See the bottom of this newsletter for information on how to subscribe, unsubscribe, or contact the editor.


Drought stress relief is possible for vegetable plants and gardeners

By Kathleen Phillips
Texas AgriLife Extension Service

Growing vegetables in a drought can be stressful not only for the plants but for gardeners. But there are some solutions, according to a Texas AgriLife Extension Service horticulturist.

"This year in Texas, we are facing a drought, and people are asking about stressed plants," said Dr. Joe Masabni, AgriLife Extension vegetable specialist. "And of course this year, lack of rain is the issue."

Masabni said a rule of thumb for raising vegetables is about 1 inch of water a week either from rainfall or irrigation.

"But when it's been so dry for so long, we forget that we need to irrigate more frequently to keep the soil profile moist and the plants healthy and never stressed," he said. "Good production comes from a situation where the plants never undergo any kind of water stress."

Masabni acknowledged that home gardeners often forget that plants need even more water as they grow bigger. He said while plants may need a half an inch in May, in July they may need an inch or more because the plants are bigger, and the soil and air temperatures are warmer.

"The problems of lack of moisture can be easily fixed by using soaker hoses or drip irrigation," Masabni said. "Set a watering system to run in the morning for a half hour and a half hour in the afternoon early in the season or maybe an hour in the morning and an hour in the afternoon, every day, later in the season."

He said these recommendations can be adjusted for local soil type and conditions.

"For commercial growers, a drought means a losing operation. But for a homeowner who can manage water, even if you get one-third of the yield, it's still enjoyable, and still tastes great and is still very nutritious," Masabni said. "Just adapt to the weather conditions and water more regularly.

"Drip irrigation is the way to go in Texas," he stressed. "Even on a regular, normal year drip irrigation is best because it's more efficient. Ninety percent of the drip irrigation water is used by the plant, compared to 40 percent to 60 percent of surface irrigation. So you can use half the amount of water with drip irrigation and get the same yields as with flood irrigation. Drip irrigation for a homeowner with a vegetable garden is the only way to be successful."



During a drought, the use of drip irrigation and mulch can help sustain landscapes. (Texas AgriLife Research photo by Kathleen Phillips)
Garden expert gives pointers for saving lawns, landscape plants during drought

By Kathleen Phillips
Texas AgriLife Extension Service

Saving valuable landscapes — even successfully adding some new plants — depends on the length of one’s hose and depth of one’s commitment, according to a Texas AgriLife Extension Service gardening expert.

“It’s the season. People are going to want to plant,” said Jayla Fry, AgriLife Extension Master Gardener program assistant in College Station. “By all means, go for it.

“But at the same time you have to realize that during times of a major drought like this, you’re going to have to add the water,” she said. “So it’s an expense that one has to weigh out when adding to the landscape.”

Fry said existing plants — from flowers to shrubs to trees — also need special care during the drought to stay healthy and last until rain returns.

“A couple of things to consider in a drought are lawns and trees,” Fry said. “With lawns of course, they need to be protected with supplemental irrigation. So about once a week you’re going to want to add about an inch of water. Bermuda grass is a little more drought tolerant than St. Augustine, so it is more forgiving.”

Trees are a higher investment for property owners and should be watered during a drought to keep them from dying.

“You’re going to want to protect trees and how you do that is with your water hose,” she said.

Fry suggested that a water hose be turned on until it produces a pencil-sized flow. Place the running hose at the drip-line, or the edge of its canopy, and move the water around the tree every 15 minutes until the ground is completely soaked.

“You need to do this every two weeks, even when the rains come again,” she said. “The trees will need the extra water to recoup from this prolonged drought.”

For flower beds, Fry said, the soil is an indicator of whether water is needed.

“If it is cool to the touch, then you’re OK,” she said. “But especially with the wind and the drought conditions, you’re going to want to supplement with irrigation. Shrubs will need between the amount of water that you add to your lawn and the amount that you add to your trees.”

Adding mulch, she noted, will maintain soil moisture and reduce soil temperatures, which helps plants survive a drought.

“And of course, by adding mulch you get the benefit of cutting down on weeds in your flower bed. So mulch can be a great help during drought periods,” Fry noted.


Gardening tips

Be on the lookout for spider mites on your tomato plants. Look for little red specs that can be easily seen with a magnifying glass. They are more prevalent in a dry year like we are now experiencing. Use a high pressure blast of water to dislodge them, paying particular attention to the underside of leaves.

Have a favorite gardening tip you’d like to share? Texas Gardener’s Seeds is seeking brief gardening tips from Texas gardeners to use in future issues. If we publish your tip in Seeds, we will send you a free Texas Gardener 2011 Planning Guide & Calendar. Please send your tips of 50 words or less to the editor at: Gardening Tips.


Did you know...

The term mesclun that you often see on pre-washed packages of salad in the grocery store is not the name of a specific variety of lettuce or salad green, but rather, the French word that means a mix of salad greens. Seed companies offer similar mixes of seeds that include lettuce, kale, mustard and other seed that make planting convenient and salads a lot less boring than plain old iceberg lettuce.


Upcoming garden events.

If you would like your organization’s events included in "Upcoming Garden Events" or would like to make a change to a listed event, please contact us at Garden Events. To ensure inclusion in this column, please provide complete details at least three weeks prior to the event.

Nacogdoches: The SFA Gardens at Stephen F. Austin State University will host its monthly Theresa and Les Reeves Lecture Series at 7 p.m. Thursday, May 19, in Room 110 of the Agriculture Building located at 1924 Wilson Drive. Horticulturist Mark Weathington will present “Thoughts on Bringing Color, Form, Texture, and Excitement into the Southern Landscape. Weathington is the assistant director and curator of collections at the JC Raulston Arboretum. He earned undergraduate degrees in horticulture and sociology and a M.S. in horticulture from Virginia Tech. He has served as director of horticulture for the Norfolk Botanical Garden and horticulturist at both the Virginia Aquarium & Marine Science Center and the Atlanta Botanic Garden. Mark writes and speaks on a variety of topics in horticulture. He has recently revised and updated the Propagation Guide for Woody Plants at the JC Raulston Arboretum. He has been published in Horticulture, Carolina Gardener, American Nurseryman, and Virginia Gardener magazines as well as the Mid-Atlantic Gardeners' Book of Lists. In addition, he writes two weekly columns for the Virginian-Pilot newspaper and features for several regional newspapers. The Theresa and Les Reeves Garden Lecture Series is generally held the third Thursday of each month at the SFA Mast Arboretum. Refreshments are served by the SFA Gardens volunteers before the lecture with a rare plant raffle being held afterward. The lecture is free and open to the public. The SFA Gardens Volunteers welcome anyone to attend their meeting at 6:15 p.m. in room 118 of the Ag Building prior to the Theresa and Les Reeves lecture. At the meeting, volunteers exchange gardening ideas and tips and discuss volunteer opportunities at SFA Gardens including hands on gardening, propagation, irrigation, children's educational activities, plant sale participation, and azalea trail activities. For more information, contact Greg Grant at 936-468-1863 or grantdamon@sfasu.edu.

Palo Pinto: Landowners in Young, Stephens and Palo Pinto counties affected by recent wildfires are invited to a workshop May 19 to learn how to restore their properties in the aftermath of a devastating disaster. The “PK Complex” fire charred more than 126,000 acres over a two-week period before firefighters contained the blaze on April 28. More than 160 homes and two churches were lost. “We want to let citizens know what resources are available to them as they recover from this tragedy,” said Carrie Smith, a forester with Texas Forest Service. The informational workshop for those affected by the PK Complex fire will be from 1 to 4:30 p.m. Thursday, May 19, at the Palo Pinto County Extension Office, 221 South Fifth Ave., Palo Pinto. Partnering agencies include Texas Forest Service, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, Natural Resources Conservation Service, Farm Service Agency, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Texas AgriLife Extension Service. Representatives from all partnering agencies will be on hand to help answer questions. Topics include “Firewise” home safety principles, tree replanting, effects of fire on wildlife management, grazing management, brush management and available cost-share programs.

Travis County: Residents in Travis County interested in learning how to protect themselves from wildfire are invited to two town hall meetings. Meetings are set for 6:30 p.m. Thursday, May 19, at the Brushy Creek Community Center, 16318 Great Oaks, Round Rock and 7 p.m. Wednesday, May 25, at Winkley Elementary School, 2100 Pow Wow, Leander. Representatives from Texas Forest Service and Travis County fire departments will be on hand to answer questions and talk about what you can do to protect your home and family from wildfire. For example, you can reduce potential losses by adopting Firewise landscaping practices 100 to 200 feet around your home. That includes moving firewood and clearing dead and dense vegetation. Wildland Urban Interface Specialist Lexi Maxwell stressed that wildfires are a community-wide problem, which means reducing risks to homes and property is everyone’s responsibility. “More than 80 percent of wildfires in Texas occur within 2 miles of a community,” Maxwell said, reminding residents that roughly 95 percent of wildfires are started by humans. “We want to encourage residents to take proactive measures that could end up saving lives and property.” For more information, visit www.texasfirestorm.org and www.texasfirewise.org.

Woodway: McLennan County Master Gardeners present "An Evening in the Gardens," Thursday, May 19, 5:30 to 7 p.m., Carleen Bright Arboretum, 9001 Bosque Blvd., Woodway. Free and open to the public. Learn about beautiful, easy care plants for the Waco area and tour two Arboretum gardens, featuring Texas Superstars and other native and adapted plants. For more information, call 254-741-0000.

Austin: “How to Read a Plant: will be presented from 1 p.m. until 3 p.m., Saturday, May 21, at Reagan Community Garden (at Reagan High School), 7104 Berkman Dr., Austin. Discover the needs of your vegetables by observing the physical condition of the plant. Need water, has a disease, infested with pests? Many practical tips will be shared by master gardeners to improve plant health and vegetable production. Park at Nelson Field stadium and enter Reagan HS grounds from St. Johns Ave. fence opening and proceed to garden near Berkman and St. Johns Ave. side of campus. This seminar is free and open to the public. It is presented by the Travis County Master Gardeners, a volunteer arm of the Texas AgriLife Extension Service in Travis County. For more information, visit www.tcmastergardeners.org.

Sunset Valley: “Propagate Your Own Plants” will be presented from 10 a.m. until noon, May 21, at Sunset Valley City Hall, 3205 Jones Rd., Sunset Valley. Learning how to propagate from existing plants is a great way to fill your garden or pass along favorites to your friends. Join Master Gardeners Tommie Clayton and Susan Jung, who will teach you how to make cuttings and divisions and successful strategies for starting plants from seed. Get tips on how to transplant and care for your new plants to get them off to a good start when placed in the garden. This seminar is free and open to the public. It is presented by the Travis County Master Gardeners, a volunteer arm of the Texas AgriLife Extension Service in Travis County. For more information, visit www.tcmastergardeners.org.

Victoria: Victoria County Master Gardener Association will hold a "Lunch and Learn With the Masters" programs May 23. Eunice Lee will discuss "Growing and Enjoying Herbs." The program will be held at the Pattie Dodson Health Center, 2805 N. Navarro St., in Victoria, from noon-1 p.m., and is free to the public. Attendees may bring a sack lunch and beverage.

Bryan: Master Gardener Mike Chandler will discuss "Lawn Care and Maintenance" at the monthly meeting of the Brazos County Master Gardeners, from 7 p.m. until 8 p.m., May 24, at Brazos Center, 3232 Briarcrest Dr., Bryan. Learn to identify pest and disease issues, how to correctly apply fertilizer, and how to properly water your lawn. For additional information, visit www.brazosmg.com.

Austin: “Plant Propagation” will be presented from 10 a.m. until noon, Friday, June 3, at Travis County AgriLife Extension Office, 1600-B Smith Rd., Austin. Plants have developed many methods to ensure survival. Learn propagation techniques which take advantage of some of these methods to create multiple plants from a single plant. Discover the importance of the propagation media, moisture, light, humidity, temperature, rooting hormones which ensure success. Examples of propagation by seeds, leaf and stem cuttings will be covered. This free seminar is presented by the Travis County Master Gardeners, a volunteer arm of the Texas AgriLife Extension Service in Travis County. For more information see www.tcmastergardeners.org or call the Master Gardener Public Gardening Help Desk at(512-854-9600.

Allen: The Allen Garden Club Garden Tour will be held Saturday, June 4, from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. Tickets are available at Puckett's Nursery, 811 E. Main, Allen. Enjoy touring six beautifully landscaped gardens in the Allen area and see water-wise plantings, outdoor living spaces, wildlife habitats, water features and more. For more information, visit www.allengardenclub.org.

Seabrook: Louis Mickler, Harris County Master Gardener, will speak on Growing Plants from Seeds and Cuttings from 6:30 p.m. until-9 p.m., Tuesday, June 14, at The Meeting Room at Clear Lake Park (on the lake side), 5001 NASA Parkway, Seabrook. This lectures are free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://harris-tx.tamu.edu/hort/greenthumb.htm.

Seabrook: Glenn Olsen, past president of the Native Plant Society of Texas and past vice president of education for the Houston Audubon Society, will speak on Gardening with Native Plants to Attract Birds and Butterflies at 10 a.m., Wednesday, June 15, at The Meeting Room at Clear Lake Park (on the lakeside), 5001 NASA Parkway, Seabrook. This lecture is free and open to the public. For more information visit: http://harris-tx.tamu.edu/hort.

Austin: Learn how to build Rain Gardens June 18, from 10 a.m. until noon at Zilker Botanical Garden, 2220 Barton Springs Rd., Austin. Excess stormwater carries urban landscape contaminants into storm drains and soil erosion causes sediments to accumulate in our water resources. Dr. Dotty Woodson, Water Resources Specialist with Texas AgriLife Extension, will tell us how to protect streams, rivers and lakes by building a rain garden. These lovely gardens are attractive landscape features planted with perennial native plants designed to absorb stormwater which filters it through plant roots and soil microorganisms. Attend this presentation and you’ll be ready to make your own beautiful solution. This seminar is free and open to the public. It is presented by the Travis County Master Gardeners, a volunteer arm of the Texas AgriLife Extension Service in Travis County. For more information, visit www.tcmastergardeners.org.

Rockport: Richard Snyder, Master Gardener, will lead "Basic Irrigation Maintenance and Design," from 11:30 a.m. until 12:30 p.m., Tuesday, June 21, at the Aransas County Library, 701 E. Mimosa, Rockport. For additional information, phone 361-790-0103.

San Antonio: The Composter Training by Lou Kellogg and the Bexar County Master Gardeners is back is scheduled for June 22-24 in San Antonio. Topics include building a compost bin, hands-on lessons in how to compost, a visit to the state's largest compost operation, soils science, and presentations from leading compost experts. The classes will he held on the grounds of the San Antonio Botanical Gardens. This intensive multi-day training empowers Master Gardeners with knowledge and skills to support and multiply Texas AgriLife Extension Service efforts in Earth-Kind educational programs in their counties. Attendance is limited to Master Gardeners. The fee is $225 for the classes and meals. For more information and an application contact David Rodriguez, County Extension Agent - Horticulture at 210-467-6575 or dhrodriguez@ag.tamu.edu.

Austin: “Joys of Container Gardening” will be presented from 10 a.m. until noon, Friday, July 15, at AgriLife Extension Office, 1600-B Smith Rd, Austin. Blooming flowers and vegetables can thrive in a container! This gardening method is especially useful if space is limited. Containers may also serve as accent points on the patio or in the garden. Learn how to select a container and the right soil, discover ideal container plants, and witness arranging techniques you can replicate to create your own mini-garden. This seminar is free and open to the public. It is presented by the Travis County Master Gardeners, a volunteer arm of the Texas AgriLife Extension Service in Travis County. For more information, visit www.tcmastergardeners.org or call the Master Gardener Help Desk at 512- 854-9600.

Rockport: DJ Chilcoat, Master Gardener, and Jeanna C. Godfrey, DVM, Master Gardener, will present "Art in the Garden, from 11:30 a.m. until 12:30 p.m., Tuesday, July 19, at the Aransas County Library, 701 E. Mimosa, Rockport. For additional information, call 361-790-0103.

Nacogdoches: Greg Grant leads "Everything you wanted to know about turf grass, but were afraid to ask" from 9 a.m. until noon, July 23, in Room 118, Ag Building, Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches. $10 members, $15 non-members. For more information or to make reservations, call 936-468-18312 or email erodewald@sfasu.edu.

Nacogdoches: Greg Grant leads "Landscape Design" from 9 a.m. until noon, September 10, in Room 118, Ag Building, Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches. $15 members, $20 non-members. For more information or to make reservations, call 936-468-18312 or email erodewald@sfasu.edu.

Conroe: The Montgomery County Master Gardener Association is pleased to present Greg Grant, Horticulturist, Plant Propagator and Humorist on Tuesday, October 4. The program will start at 7 p.m. and will be held at the Thomas LeRoy Education Center, 9020 Airport Road, Conroe, which is across the street from the Lone Star Convention Center. Greg is a contributor to Texas Gardener Magazine, among others, and his topic for the evening will be Home Landscaping — Texas: Right Plant, Right Place. His talk will include basic landscaping design principles as well as some of his favorite plants. This is a rare opportunity to see one of Texas’ best gardening speakers in a local setting. The fee will be $20.00 per person and seating will be limited. Please call 936-539-7824 Monday through Friday for more information, or visit www.montgomerycountymastergardeners.org. There will also be information available about the Montgomery County Master Gardeners’ Fall Plant Sale at this event, which will be held Saturday, October 15, from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m.

MONTHLY MEETINGS

Houston: The Harris County Master Gardeners meet at noon the first Tuesday of each month at the Texas AgriLife Extension, 3033 Bear Creek Drive (near the intersection of Highway 6 and Patterson Road), Houston. For additional information visit http://hcmga.tamu.edu or call 281-855-5600.

Rockport: Rockport: Monthly meetings of the Aransas/San Patricio Master Gardeners are held at 10 a.m. on the first Tuesday of each month at Texas AgriLife Extension Service - Aransas County Office, 611 E. Mimosa, Rockport. For additional information, e-mail aransas-tx@tamu.edu or call 361-790-0103.

Kilgore: Northeast Texas Organic Gardeners meets at 1 p.m. on the first Wednesday of each month. For more information, call Carole Ramke at 903-986-9475.

Allen: The Allen Garden Club meets at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month, February through December, at the Allen Heritage Center, 100 E. Main St., Allen. For more information, visit www.allengardenclub.org.

Brownwood: The Brown County Master Gardeners Association meets the first Thursday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 605 Fisk Ave., Brownwood. For further information, call Mary Green Engle at 325-784-8453.

Austin: Austin Organic Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. on the second Monday of each month at the Zilker Botanical Gardens in Austin. For more information, visit www.main.org/aog.

Marion: The Guadalupe County (Schertz/Seguin) Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets on the second Tuesday of each month except July and August at The Library, 500 Bulldog, Marion. There is a plant exchange and meet-and-greet begins at 6:30 p.m. followed by the program at 7 p.m. Visitors are welcome. For more information or an application to join NPSOT visit www.npsot.org/GuadalupeCounty/ or contact contact guadalupecounty@npsot.org.

Rockport: The Rockport Herb & Rose Study Group, founded in March 2003, meets the second Wednesday of each month at 10 a.m. at 619 N. Live Oak Street, Room 14, Rockport, to discuss all aspects of using and growing herbs, including historical uses and tips for successful propagation and cultivation. Sometimes they take field trips and have cooking demonstrations in different locations. For more information, contact Linda 361-729-6037, Ruth 361-729-8923 or Cindy 979-562-2153 or visit www.rockportherbs.org and http://rockportherbies.blogspot.com.

Beaumont: The Jefferson County Master Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the AgriLife Extension Office, 1225 Pearl Street, Suite 200, Beaumont. For more information, call 409-835-8461.

Brownwood: Brown County Master Gardeners Association meets the second Thursday of each month, from Noon to 1 p.m., at the Brown County AgriLife Extension Office, 605 Fisk, Brownwood. For additional information, call Freda Day 325-643-1077, or Mary Engle 325-784-8453.

Georgetown: The Williamson County Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the Georgetown Public Library, 402 W. 8th Street. Georgetown. For additional information, contract Billye Adams at 512-863-9636 or visit http://www.npsot.org/WilliamsonCounty/default.htm.

Orange: The Orange County Master Gardeners meet at the Salvation Army in Orange on the second Thursday of each month. A covered-dish dinner at 6:30 p.m. is followed by a speaker and business meeting at 7 p.m.

San Antonio: The San Antonio Herb Society meets at 7 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month at the San Antonio Garden Center, 3310 N. New Braunfels (corner of Funston & N. New Braunfels). For more information on programs, visit www.sanantonioherbs.org.

Dallas: The Rainbow Garden Club of North Texas meets the second Sunday of each month at 2 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Meetings are held at member’s homes and garden centers around the area. For more information, visit www.RainbowGardenClub.com.

Arlington: The Arlington Men's Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the third Monday of each month (except December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact Lance Jepson at LJepson@aol.com.

Cleburne: The Johnson County Master Gardeners meet at 2 p.m. on the third Monday of each month at McGregor House, 1628 W. Henderson, Cleburne, which includes a program and a meet & greet. For more information, call Diane Asberry at 817-558-3932.

Sugar Land: The Sugar Land Garden Club meets on the third Tuesday of each month, September through November and January through April at 10 a.m. at the Sugar Land Community Center, 226 Matlage Way, Sugar Land. The club hosts a different speaker each month. For more information, visit www.sugarlandgardenclub.org.

Denton: The Denton Organic Society, a group devoted to sharing information and educating the public regarding organic principles, meets the third Wednesday of each month (except July, August and December) at the Denton Senior Center, 509 N. Bell Avenue. Meetings are free and open to the public. Meetings begin at 7 p.m. and are preceded by a social at 6:30. For more information, call 940-382-8551.

Glen Rose: The Somervell County Master Gardeners meet at 10 a.m., the third Wednesday of each month at the Somervell County AgriLife Extension office, 1405 Texas Drive, Glen Rose. Visitors are welcome. For more information, call 254-897-2809 or visit www.somervellmastergardeners.org.

Granbury: The Lake Granbury Master Gardeners meet at 1 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at the Hood County Annex 1, 1410 West Pearl Street, Granbury. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program each month preceding the business meeting. For information on topics call 817-579-3280 or visit http://www.hoodcountymastergardeners.org/.

Seabrook: The Harris County Precinct 2 Master Gardeners hold an educational program at 10 a.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at The Meeting Room at Clear Lake Park (on the Lakeside), 5001 NASA Road 1, Seabrook. The programs are free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu.

Houston: The Native Plant Society of Texas — Houston (NPSOT-H) meets at 7 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except for October (4th Thursday) and December (2nd Thursday). Location varies. For locations, for more information on programs, and for information about native plants for Houston, visit http://www.npsot.org/Houston.

Rosenberg: The Fort Bend Master Gardeners meet at 7:00 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except December at the Bud O’Shieles Community Center located at 1330 Band Road, Rosenberg. For more information, call 281-341-7068 or visit www.fbmg.com.

Seguin: The Guadalupe County Master Gardeners meets at 7 p.m. the third Thursday of each month, except December, at the Texas AgriLife Extension Bldg. at 210 E. Live Oak, Seguin. An educational program precedes the business meeting. The public is invited to attend. For topic or other information, call 830-379-1972 or visit www.guadalupecountymastergardeners.org.

Atlanta: The Caddo Wildflower Chapter of Native Plants Society meets the fourth Tuesday of each month at the Horne Enterprise building in Atlanta at 7 p.m. Visitors are welcome. For additional information, contact Kay Lowery at frostkay268@aol.com.

Brackenridge Park: The Native Plant Society San Antonio Chapter meets every fourth Tuesday of each month at 7:00 p.m. in the Lions Field Adult and Senior Center, 2809 Broadway at E. Mulberry, Brackenridge Park, except August and December. Social and seed/plant exchange at 6:30 p.m. Free and open to the public. For more information, contact Bea at 210-999-7292 or visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio.

Edna: The Jackson County Master Gardeners present their "Come Grown With Us" seminars on the fourth Tuesday of each month, January through October, beginning at 7 p.m. at 411 N. Wells, Edna. The seminars are free, open to the public and offer 2 CEU hours to Master Gardeners or others requiring them. For additional information, contact the Jackson County Extension Office at 361-782-3312.

Fort Worth: The Organic Garden Club of Forth Worth meets at 7 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday of each month except July and December at the Fort Worth Botanic Gardens main building. Refreshments are served. For more information, call 817-274-8460.

San Antonio: The Native Plant Society of Texas San Antonio Chapter meets the fourth Tuesday of the month, except August and December, at the Lions Field Adult & Senior Center, 2809 Broadway, San Antonio. Social and plant/seed exchange at 6:30 p.m., program at 7:00 p.m. For more information, visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio or call Bea at 210-999-7292.

Leander: The Leander Garden Club meets on the fourth Thursday of each month (except July and August) at 10:30 a.m. at the Leander Presbyterian Church, 101 N. West Drive, Leander, unless there is a field trip or an event at a member's home. Following a short business meeting, there is usually a program, followed by a shared pot-luck luncheon. To confirm the meeting place and time, please call Cathy Clark-Ramsey at 512-963-4698 or email texascatalina@yahoo.com.

Dallas: The Dallas Organic Garden Club meets at 2:30 p.m. on the fourth Sunday of each month at the North Haven Gardens, 7700 Northaven Rd., Dallas. For more information, call 214-824-2448 or visit www.dogc.org.

Arlington: The Arlington Organic Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the last Thursday of each month (except November and December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact David at 817) 483-7746.


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Texas Gardener’s Seeds is published weekly. © Suntex Communications, Inc. 2011. All rights reserved. You may forward this publication to your friends and colleagues if it is sent in its entirety. No individual part of this newsletter may be reproduced in any manner without prior written permission from the publisher.

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Publisher: Chris S. Corby ● Editor: Michael Bracken

Texas Gardener’s Seeds, P.O. Box 9005, Waco, Texas 76714 ● www.TexasGardener.com