June 1, 2011

Welcome to Texas Gardener’s Seeds, the weekly newsletter for Texas gardeners. Please do not reply to this e-mail because the sending address is not monitored. See the bottom of this newsletter for information on how to subscribe, unsubscribe, or contact the editor.


Help with plant care during drought offered on Earth-Kind website

By Kathleen Phillips
Texas AgriLife Extension Service

Rain has been scarce across most of Texas, but there is a flood of information on an Earth-Kind website aimed at helping plant lovers ease their landscapes through the drought.

“We have a lot of different tools to help out,” said Martin Anderson, Texas AgriLife Extension Service web administrator for horticulture. “All of the information that would help someone is in one place.”

Before heading out to a hot, dry flower bed, Anderson suggested, one could explore http://earthkind.tamu.edu/drought.

Earth-Kind Landscaping is an AgriLife Extension program that “uses research-proven techniques to provide maximum garden and landscape enjoyment while preserving and protecting the environment,” according to the website.

“What we’re trying to do is provide information that anyone across Texas can implement and get good landscape performance with minimal inputs and drought tolerance,” Anderson added.

One feature he pointed to is an Earth-Kind plant selector, which rates plants based on how well they would do in different areas of Texas.

“This will give a person a quick, easy look at the best plants for a particular area,” he said.

Along with the online information, several publications are available for download from the site, he said. Topics include water conservation, energy conservation in the landscape and recycling in the landscape, for example.

“A lot of the information is not region specific because the techniques can be applied across the state,” Anderson said. “It’s a comprehensive area for people to look at the Earth-Kind methods to help protect their landscape during a drought."

The site also provides information on contacting a county office of AgriLife Extension.


The garden reader:
From field to garden

By William Scheick
Book Reviewer

Alfred Richardson and Ken King. Plants of Deep South Texas: A Field Guide to the Woody and Flowering Species. Texas A&M University Press, 2011. 448 pp. $30.00.

Geoff Bryant and Tony Rodd. Trees and Shrubs: A Gardener’s Encyclopedia. Firefly Books, 2011. 416 pp. $19.95.

Writing about gardening in Texas can be tricky. As longtime readers of Texas Gardener have doubtless noticed, advice in the magazine is sometimes determined by state region.

Last March, for instance, Skip Richter wrote: “North Texas gardeners can still get in a ‘last call’ planting of lettuce and carrots. South Texas gardeners can take advantage of the extra warmth to plant cantaloupe and watermelon.”

Dividing Texas into northern and southern halves certainly helps when advising Lone Star gardeners. But Skip and his readers also know that this broad zonal division is only part of a bigger story about our state — a story too big to be minutely addressed in a readable article.

Like North and South, for instance, East and West Texas are markedly different in their gardening protocols. Moreover, East and West Texas differ not just from each other but also from North and South Texas.

Even distinguishing between North, South, East and West might sometimes be inadequate in an article about gardening in Texas. In the North, for instance, the plant environment of Amarillo is not the same as that of Denton, which is not the same as that of Texarkana.

South Texas is likewise environmentally variable, especially when we think about the Houston area or about “deep” South Texas. Deep South Texas has the highest cold hardiness zone in our state — zone 9b (according to the outdated USDA map) or zone 10 (according to the more recent Arbor Day Foundation map).

So a gardening writer might get a headache when trying to accommodate all these narrower regional differences in a single article. It might not even be safe to recommend a Texas native plant without considering closely the state region where it is native.

Which makes Plants of Deep South Texas an especially welcome book. For the native plant lover — both in the field and in the garden — this richly illustrated guide identifies over 800 wild plants found in the Lower Rio Grande Valley (Cameron, Hidalgo, Willacy and Starr counties).

It is interesting to note, for example, the absence of a milkweed (Asclepias tuberosa) that is generally said to be prevalent throughout our state. Apparently, instead, in “deep” South Texas one finds tropical milkweed (A. curassavica), a garden escapee gone wild that monarch butterflies also love.

Plants of Deep South Texas is a big book well worth the price of admission to its wonderful display.

Describing and illustrating over 1,500 plants, Trees and Shrubs is another superb production, both as a succinct guide and also as a handsome book. No milkweed makes the cut in this assemblage, but plenty of other Texas-viable plants do.

Browsing through Trees and Shrubs will likely introduce you to plants you never knew about before, some of which you might be inspired to try in your garden or a patio container.


Planning the Urban Forest workshop stresses value of trees

Texas Forest Service

You know trees are important, but just how much are they really worth to you and your community

You can find out at the Planning the Urban Forest workshop scheduled for Thursday, June 2, 2011, at the Waco Convention Center.

“This workshop will help communities put a dollar value on their trees and green infrastructure,” Texas Forest Service Urban Forester Jim Carse said. “We can help you discover the economic, environmental and social benefits provided by your urban forest in your city — and why they’re important.”

Created by the American Planning Association and hosted by Texas Forest Service, the workshop is designed to help communities plan and conserve their urban forest. It’s based on a 2009 report developed by the American Planning Association, International Society of Arboriculture, American Forests and U.S. Forest Service.

Considered a pilot program, the workshop is first being unveiled in Texas. Future workshops are planned for other states.

The Planning the Urban Forest workshop is geared toward community planners, landscape architects, engineers, public works managers, elected officials and civic leaders statewide. It aims to help officials learn how to integrate urban forestry with community and regional comprehensive planning processes.

"The intent of this workshop is to help planners and allied professionals and tree advocates reposition trees as a strategic public investment rather than the cost center they have been perceived to be,” said Jim Schwab, a senior research associate with the American Planning Association and project manager for the 2009 Planning the Urban Forest report. “The urban forest returns numerous quantifiable benefits."

Carse agreed. For example, he said, trees reduce stormwater runoff and, as a result, the need for related infrastructure costs. They also shade roads and homes, reducing both heating and cooling costs and ambient air temperature inside a city. That information, Carse explained, is pertinent to a comprehensive plan.

And that’s not to mention the social benefits provided by trees, Carse said, adding that they encourage outdoor recreation, which helps combat medical issues such as obesity, skin cancer and asthma.

“At the workshop, you’ll learn how to realistically account for urban tree benefits in your own community,” Carse said, noting that attendees could learn from industry experts as well as their peers. “You’ll learn how trees impact your economy and the character of your city.”

Attendees will earn 4.25 hours of Certificate Maintenance through the American Institute of Certified Planners.

Planning the Urban Forest Workshop
Thursday, June 2, 2011
9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Waco Convention Center in Waco, Texas Forest Service


The compost heap
Fridge better than freezer

"Putting the seeds in the freezer will kill them ('Gardening Tips,' Seeds, May 25, 1011)," writes Tom Harris. "Putting them in the fridge will allow them to keep for years."


Gardening tips

"If you have problems with birds getting your tomatoes," writes Jerry Smith, "make small bags out of spun row cover and put one over each large green tomato or over a whole cluster of cherry tomatoes.  It will protect them from birds but allow them to ripen on the vine normally. You can fasten them in place with clothes pins or get fancy and make the bags with draw strings."

Have a favorite gardening tip you’d like to share? Texas Gardener’s Seeds is seeking brief gardening tips from Texas gardeners to use in future issues. If we publish your tip in Seeds, we will send you a free Texas Gardener 2011 Planning Guide & Calendar. Please send your tips of 50 words or less to the editor at: Gardening Tips.


Did you know...

Yellow squash that suddenly starts producing green and yellow streaked squash is not cross pollinating with another squash or cucumbers. Instead, it has become infected with squash mosaic virus that is commonly spread by insects such as squash bugs. The disease makes for interesting looking squash that is okay to eat because the virus only affects squash plants, not humans.


Upcoming garden events.

If you would like your organization’s events included in "Upcoming Garden Events" or would like to make a change to a listed event, please contact us at Garden Events. To ensure inclusion in this column, please provide complete details at least three weeks prior to the event.

Austin: “Plant Propagation” will be presented from 10 a.m. until noon, Friday, June 3, at Travis County AgriLife Extension Office, 1600-B Smith Rd., Austin. Plants have developed many methods to ensure survival. Learn propagation techniques which take advantage of some of these methods to create multiple plants from a single plant. Discover the importance of the propagation media, moisture, light, humidity, temperature, rooting hormones which ensure success. Examples of propagation by seeds, leaf and stem cuttings will be covered. This free seminar is presented by the Travis County Master Gardeners, a volunteer arm of the Texas AgriLife Extension Service in Travis County. For more information see www.tcmastergardeners.org or call the Master Gardener Public Gardening Help Desk at(512-854-9600.

Allen: The Allen Garden Club Garden Tour will be held Saturday, June 4, from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. Tickets are available at Puckett's Nursery, 811 E. Main, Allen. Enjoy touring six beautifully landscaped gardens in the Allen area and see water-wise plantings, outdoor living spaces, wildlife habitats, water features and more. For more information, visit www.allengardenclub.org.

Houston: 7th annual Urban Harvest Tomato Fest. Urban Harvest’s popular Tomato Fest is being expanded to a week, celebrating the peak of tomato season at all three of their farmers markets, June 5-11. Highland Village Farmers Market — Sunday, June 5, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., 2720 Suffolk. Tomato Fest will kick off at the Highland Village Farmers Market with activities for the whole family! Williams Sonoma will cook up tasty samples using tomatoes fresh from the market at the Chef’s Corner sponsored by My Table magazine. Stick a Fork in It! will offer cooking classes for kids to teach some fun tomato recipes the whole family will enjoy. And all will be able to taste the season’s bounty in the brunch items for sale at the market. City Hall Farmers Market — Wednesday, June 8, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., 400 Rusk. The festivities will continue downtown where the Sur La Table Cooking School will be demoing fresh tomato recipes at My Table’s Chef’s Corner. Market patrons will also be able to sample some of the varieties available for sale at the market. Eastside Farmers Market — Saturday, June 11, 8 a.m. to noon, 3000 Richmond. Official Tomato Fest Day! “Tomato Doctor” Dr. Bob Randall will provide tomato wisdom and growing tips, and there will be 15 varieties of tomatoes to sample (while supplies last). At the My Table magazine Chef’s Corner will be Paul Petronella of Paulie’s serving gazpacho with fresh tomatoes from the market. As always, there will be live music. Admission: As always, free admission to attend the Farmers Markets.

Seabrook: Louis Mickler, Harris County Master Gardener, will speak on Growing Plants from Seeds and Cuttings from 6:30 p.m. until-9 p.m., Tuesday, June 14, at The Meeting Room at Clear Lake Park (on the lake side), 5001 NASA Parkway, Seabrook. This lectures are free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://harris-tx.tamu.edu/hort/greenthumb.htm.

Seabrook: Glenn Olsen, past president of the Native Plant Society of Texas and past vice president of education for the Houston Audubon Society, will speak on Gardening with Native Plants to Attract Birds and Butterflies at 10 a.m., Wednesday, June 15, at The Meeting Room at Clear Lake Park (on the lakeside), 5001 NASA Parkway, Seabrook. This lecture is free and open to the public. For more information visit: http://harris-tx.tamu.edu/hort.

Austin: Learn how to build Rain Gardens June 18, from 10 a.m. until noon at Zilker Botanical Garden, 2220 Barton Springs Rd., Austin. Excess stormwater carries urban landscape contaminants into storm drains and soil erosion causes sediments to accumulate in our water resources. Dr. Dotty Woodson, Water Resources Specialist with Texas AgriLife Extension, will tell us how to protect streams, rivers and lakes by building a rain garden. These lovely gardens are attractive landscape features planted with perennial native plants designed to absorb stormwater which filters it through plant roots and soil microorganisms. Attend this presentation and you’ll be ready to make your own beautiful solution. This seminar is free and open to the public. It is presented by the Travis County Master Gardeners, a volunteer arm of the Texas AgriLife Extension Service in Travis County. For more information, visit www.tcmastergardeners.org.

Dallas: “Butterfly Seasons: Summer,” Saturday, June 18, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. at Texas Discovery Gardens at Fair Park, 3601 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Dallas. Don't miss the second installment in this new series on butterflies by Dallas County Lepidopterist Society's co-founder Dale Clark. Summertime in Dallas brings not only long, hot days, but also so many new butterflies onto the scene. Swallowtail populations increase, returning emigrant species from the south begin to repopulate the area, and everywhere you turn there are caterpillars chowing down seemingly on everything in sight. Surviving — and thriving — in the Texas heat is no problem for our native species. Come see how they survive and grow during the hottest time of the year. $15, $10 for TDG Members.

Rockport: Richard Snyder, Master Gardener, will lead "Basic Irrigation Maintenance and Design," from 11:30 a.m. until 12:30 p.m., Tuesday, June 21, at the Aransas County Library, 701 E. Mimosa, Rockport. For additional information, phone 361-790-0103.

San Antonio: The Composter Training by Lou Kellogg and the Bexar County Master Gardeners is back is scheduled for June 22-24 in San Antonio. Topics include building a compost bin, hands-on lessons in how to compost, a visit to the state's largest compost operation, soils science, and presentations from leading compost experts. The classes will he held on the grounds of the San Antonio Botanical Gardens. This intensive multi-day training empowers Master Gardeners with knowledge and skills to support and multiply Texas AgriLife Extension Service efforts in Earth-Kind educational programs in their counties. Attendance is limited to Master Gardeners. The fee is $225 for the classes and meals. For more information and an application contact David Rodriguez, County Extension Agent - Horticulture at 210-467-6575 or dhrodriguez@ag.tamu.edu.

Austin: “Joys of Container Gardening” will be presented from 10 a.m. until noon, Friday, July 15, at AgriLife Extension Office, 1600-B Smith Rd, Austin. Blooming flowers and vegetables can thrive in a container! This gardening method is especially useful if space is limited. Containers may also serve as accent points on the patio or in the garden. Learn how to select a container and the right soil, discover ideal container plants, and witness arranging techniques you can replicate to create your own mini-garden. This seminar is free and open to the public. It is presented by the Travis County Master Gardeners, a volunteer arm of the Texas AgriLife Extension Service in Travis County. For more information, visit www.tcmastergardeners.org or call the Master Gardener Help Desk at 512- 854-9600.

Rockport: DJ Chilcoat, Master Gardener, and Jeanna C. Godfrey, DVM, Master Gardener, will present "Art in the Garden, from 11:30 a.m. until 12:30 p.m., Tuesday, July 19, at the Aransas County Library, 701 E. Mimosa, Rockport. For additional information, call 361-790-0103.

Nacogdoches: Greg Grant leads "Everything you wanted to know about turf grass, but were afraid to ask" from 9 a.m. until noon, July 23, in Room 118, Ag Building, Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches. $10 members, $15 non-members. For more information or to make reservations, call 936-468-18312 or email erodewald@sfasu.edu.

Nacogdoches: Greg Grant leads "Landscape Design" from 9 a.m. until noon, September 10, in Room 118, Ag Building, Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches. $15 members, $20 non-members. For more information or to make reservations, call 936-468-18312 or email erodewald@sfasu.edu.

Conroe: The Montgomery County Master Gardener Association is pleased to present Greg Grant, Horticulturist, Plant Propagator and Humorist on Tuesday, October 4. The program will start at 7 p.m. and will be held at the Thomas LeRoy Education Center, 9020 Airport Road, Conroe, which is across the street from the Lone Star Convention Center. Greg is a contributor to Texas Gardener Magazine, among others, and his topic for the evening will be Home Landscaping — Texas: Right Plant, Right Place. His talk will include basic landscaping design principles as well as some of his favorite plants. This is a rare opportunity to see one of Texas’ best gardening speakers in a local setting. The fee will be $20.00 per person and seating will be limited. Please call 936-539-7824 Monday through Friday for more information, or visit www.montgomerycountymastergardeners.org. There will also be information available about the Montgomery County Master Gardeners’ Fall Plant Sale at this event, which will be held Saturday, October 15, from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m.

MONTHLY MEETINGS

Houston: The Harris County Master Gardeners meet at noon the first Tuesday of each month at the Texas AgriLife Extension, 3033 Bear Creek Drive (near the intersection of Highway 6 and Patterson Road), Houston. For additional information visit http://hcmga.tamu.edu or call 281-855-5600.

Rockport: Rockport: Monthly meetings of the Aransas/San Patricio Master Gardeners are held at 10 a.m. on the first Tuesday of each month at Texas AgriLife Extension Service - Aransas County Office, 611 E. Mimosa, Rockport. For additional information, e-mail aransas-tx@tamu.edu or call 361-790-0103.

Kilgore: Northeast Texas Organic Gardeners meets at 1 p.m. on the first Wednesday of each month. For more information, call Carole Ramke at 903-986-9475.

Allen: The Allen Garden Club meets at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month, February through December, at the Allen Heritage Center, 100 E. Main St., Allen. For more information, visit www.allengardenclub.org.

Brownwood: The Brown County Master Gardeners Association meets the first Thursday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 605 Fisk Ave., Brownwood. For further information, call Mary Green Engle at 325-784-8453.

Austin: Austin Organic Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. on the second Monday of each month at the Zilker Botanical Gardens in Austin. For more information, visit www.main.org/aog.

Marion: The Guadalupe County (Schertz/Seguin) Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets on the second Tuesday of each month except July and August at The Library, 500 Bulldog, Marion. There is a plant exchange and meet-and-greet begins at 6:30 p.m. followed by the program at 7 p.m. Visitors are welcome. For more information or an application to join NPSOT visit www.npsot.org/GuadalupeCounty/ or contact contact guadalupecounty@npsot.org.

Rockport: The Rockport Herb & Rose Study Group, founded in March 2003, meets the second Wednesday of each month at 10 a.m. at 619 N. Live Oak Street, Room 14, Rockport, to discuss all aspects of using and growing herbs, including historical uses and tips for successful propagation and cultivation. Sometimes they take field trips and have cooking demonstrations in different locations. For more information, contact Linda 361-729-6037, Ruth 361-729-8923 or Cindy 979-562-2153 or visit www.rockportherbs.org and http://rockportherbies.blogspot.com.

Beaumont: The Jefferson County Master Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the AgriLife Extension Office, 1225 Pearl Street, Suite 200, Beaumont. For more information, call 409-835-8461.

Brownwood: Brown County Master Gardeners Association meets the second Thursday of each month, from Noon to 1 p.m., at the Brown County AgriLife Extension Office, 605 Fisk, Brownwood. For additional information, call Freda Day 325-643-1077, or Mary Engle 325-784-8453.

Georgetown: The Williamson County Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the Georgetown Public Library, 402 W. 8th Street. Georgetown. For additional information, contract Billye Adams at 512-863-9636 or visit http://www.npsot.org/WilliamsonCounty/default.htm.

Orange: The Orange County Master Gardeners meet at the Salvation Army in Orange on the second Thursday of each month. A covered-dish dinner at 6:30 p.m. is followed by a speaker and business meeting at 7 p.m.

San Antonio: The San Antonio Herb Society meets at 7 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month at the San Antonio Garden Center, 3310 N. New Braunfels (corner of Funston & N. New Braunfels). For more information on programs, visit www.sanantonioherbs.org.

Dallas: The Rainbow Garden Club of North Texas meets the second Sunday of each month at 2 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Meetings are held at member’s homes and garden centers around the area. For more information, visit www.RainbowGardenClub.com.

Arlington: The Arlington Men's Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the third Monday of each month (except December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact Lance Jepson at LJepson@aol.com.

Cleburne: The Johnson County Master Gardeners meet at 2 p.m. on the third Monday of each month at McGregor House, 1628 W. Henderson, Cleburne, which includes a program and a meet & greet. For more information, call Diane Asberry at 817-558-3932.

Sugar Land: The Sugar Land Garden Club meets on the third Tuesday of each month, September through November and January through April at 10 a.m. at the Sugar Land Community Center, 226 Matlage Way, Sugar Land. The club hosts a different speaker each month. For more information, visit www.sugarlandgardenclub.org.

Denton: The Denton Organic Society, a group devoted to sharing information and educating the public regarding organic principles, meets the third Wednesday of each month (except July, August and December) at the Denton Senior Center, 509 N. Bell Avenue. Meetings are free and open to the public. Meetings begin at 7 p.m. and are preceded by a social at 6:30. For more information, call 940-382-8551.

Glen Rose: The Somervell County Master Gardeners meet at 10 a.m., the third Wednesday of each month at the Somervell County AgriLife Extension office, 1405 Texas Drive, Glen Rose. Visitors are welcome. For more information, call 254-897-2809 or visit www.somervellmastergardeners.org.

Granbury: The Lake Granbury Master Gardeners meet at 1 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at the Hood County Annex 1, 1410 West Pearl Street, Granbury. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program each month preceding the business meeting. For information on topics call 817-579-3280 or visit http://www.hoodcountymastergardeners.org/.

Seabrook: The Harris County Precinct 2 Master Gardeners hold an educational program at 10 a.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at The Meeting Room at Clear Lake Park (on the Lakeside), 5001 NASA Road 1, Seabrook. The programs are free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu.

Houston: The Native Plant Society of Texas — Houston (NPSOT-H) meets at 7 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except for October (4th Thursday) and December (2nd Thursday). Location varies. For locations, for more information on programs, and for information about native plants for Houston, visit http://www.npsot.org/Houston.

Rosenberg: The Fort Bend Master Gardeners meet at 7:00 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except December at the Bud O’Shieles Community Center located at 1330 Band Road, Rosenberg. For more information, call 281-341-7068 or visit www.fbmg.com.

Seguin: The Guadalupe County Master Gardeners meets at 7 p.m. the third Thursday of each month, except December, at the Texas AgriLife Extension Bldg. at 210 E. Live Oak, Seguin. An educational program precedes the business meeting. The public is invited to attend. For topic or other information, call 830-379-1972 or visit www.guadalupecountymastergardeners.org.

Atlanta: The Caddo Wildflower Chapter of Native Plants Society meets the fourth Tuesday of each month at the Horne Enterprise building in Atlanta at 7 p.m. Visitors are welcome. For additional information, contact Kay Lowery at frostkay268@aol.com.

Brackenridge Park: The Native Plant Society San Antonio Chapter meets every fourth Tuesday of each month at 7:00 p.m. in the Lions Field Adult and Senior Center, 2809 Broadway at E. Mulberry, Brackenridge Park, except August and December. Social and seed/plant exchange at 6:30 p.m. Free and open to the public. For more information, contact Bea at 210-999-7292 or visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio.

Edna: The Jackson County Master Gardeners present their "Come Grown With Us" seminars on the fourth Tuesday of each month, January through October, beginning at 7 p.m. at 411 N. Wells, Edna. The seminars are free, open to the public and offer 2 CEU hours to Master Gardeners or others requiring them. For additional information, contact the Jackson County Extension Office at 361-782-3312.

Fort Worth: The Organic Garden Club of Forth Worth meets at 7 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday of each month except July and December at the Fort Worth Botanic Gardens main building. Refreshments are served. For more information, call 817-274-8460.

San Antonio: The Native Plant Society of Texas San Antonio Chapter meets the fourth Tuesday of the month, except August and December, at the Lions Field Adult & Senior Center, 2809 Broadway, San Antonio. Social and plant/seed exchange at 6:30 p.m., program at 7:00 p.m. For more information, visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio or call Bea at 210-999-7292.

Leander: The Leander Garden Club meets on the fourth Thursday of each month (except July and August) at 10:30 a.m. at the Leander Presbyterian Church, 101 N. West Drive, Leander, unless there is a field trip or an event at a member's home. Following a short business meeting, there is usually a program, followed by a shared pot-luck luncheon. To confirm the meeting place and time, please call Cathy Clark-Ramsey at 512-963-4698 or email texascatalina@yahoo.com.

Dallas: The Dallas Organic Garden Club meets at 2:30 p.m. on the fourth Sunday of each month at the North Haven Gardens, 7700 Northaven Rd., Dallas. For more information, call 214-824-2448 or visit www.dogc.org.

Arlington: The Arlington Organic Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the last Thursday of each month (except November and December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact David at 817) 483-7746.


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In Greg's Garden:
A Pineywoods Perspective on Gardening, Nature and Family

An intimate and personal exploration of the life of one of Texas’s most beloved gardeners, In Greg’s Garden: A Pineywoods Perspective on Gardening, Nature and Family gathers in a single volume the first nine years of Greg Grant’s columns from Texas Gardener magazine.

Revised and updated from their original publication, these 54 essays reveal the heart and soul of a seventh generation native Texan who has devoted his entire life to gardening, nature and family. With degrees in floriculture and horticulture from Texas A&M University and extensive hands-on experience as a horticulturist with the Texas Agricultural Extension Service, Stephen F. Austin State University, Mercer Arboretum and San Antonio Botanical Gardens, Grant has successfully introduced dozens of plants to the Texas nursery industry, all while maintaining long-held family property and renovating the homes of his ancestors in Arcadia, Texas.

In Greg’s Garden: A Pineywoods Perspective on Gardening, Nature and Family is a must-read for every Texas gardener.

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Texas Gardener’s Seeds is published weekly. © Suntex Communications, Inc. 2011. All rights reserved. You may forward this publication to your friends and colleagues if it is sent in its entirety. No individual part of this newsletter may be reproduced in any manner without prior written permission from the publisher.

Missed an issue? Back issues of Texas Gardener’s Seeds are available at www.texasgardener.com/newsletters.

Publisher: Chris S. Corby ● Editor: Michael Bracken

Texas Gardener’s Seeds, P.O. Box 9005, Waco, Texas 76714 ● www.TexasGardener.com