June 22, 2011

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Insects also bugged by Texas drought

By Paul Schattenberg
Texas AgriLife Extension Service

The high temperatures and lack of moisture from the extended drought are having a serious impact on insects as well as humans, according to Texas AgriLife Extension Service and Texas AgriLife Research entomologists.

“Summer is typically a busy time for many insects,” said Wizzie Brown, an AgriLife Extension integrated pest management specialist at the agency’s Travis County office. “In the Austin area, we’ve been getting calls from residents who say they are noticing an increase in pill bugs getting into their homes, as well as more wasp and fly activity in and around their houses.”

Mostly, the pill bugs and wasps are just seeking moisture and are migrating toward homes where people are irrigating their lawns and gardens, she said. As for the flies, the increased heat is making garbage decompose faster and stink more, drawing them to it and providing them with both a food source and breeding location.

Brown added that June bugs — more accurately May or June beetles — a common sight this time of year, have not been as active recently because their major flight came earlier this year.

“We’ve seen the beetles earlier this year, and I remember seeing a lot of them in late February and March,” she said. “That’s because it was unusually warm here earlier in the year and that warmth, plus whatever moisture we got then, triggered their proliferation. But now that it’s even hotter and there’s even less moisture, they’ve become less active.”

“I’ve also had some calls from people complaining about chigger bites they’re gotten while outdoors, Brown said. “But so far I don’t know if those are really chiggers or flea bites as nobody has brought me an insect sample for identification.”

“While I’ve heard of increased numbers of fleas in the San Antonio area, I don’t think the evidence indicates there’s been a larger-than-usual proliferation this season,” said Molly Keck, AgriLife Extension integrated pest management specialist for Bexar County. “Fleas always become more active around summertime; it’s just that people tend to forget that this happens every year.”

Keck, however, noted that one type of increase in insect activity in South Central Texas and other regions of the state most likely spurred by the prolonged drought is an uptick in scorpion and tarantula migration.

“Both are looking for moisture and a cooler place to live, so they tend to migrate around or even into people’s homes, provided they can find an opening,” she said. “In the case of the tarantulas, the males are also likely migrating in their search for a mate.”

Recently, grasshoppers have been a problem in some areas of East Texas, especially for hay producers, said Dr. Allen Knutson, AgriLife Extension entomologist at the Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Center in Dallas.

“Grasshoppers survive better and grow faster during hot, dry weather, so drought conditions certainly favor their increase,” he said. “With the dry conditions this spring, grasshopper problems are more widespread, and young hoppers often increase in non-cropland areas on weeds around fields. Then as these weeds are consumed or dry out in the summer heat, grasshoppers move to crops and irrigated landscapes, creating problems for many agricultural producers and others.”

On the other hand, drought conditions in East Texas and other areas of the state have significantly reduced some insect activity, Knutson explained.

“Fire ants tunnel deeper into the soil seeking moisture during drought, so their mounds are not as evident as during wet periods. And horn fly populations in rural areas are also reduced during a drought as the manure pats in which they reproduce dry up quickly, limiting their ability to multiply.”

Other recent increase in insect activity statewide has included a greater movement indoors of cockroaches, ants, centipedes and millipedes and crickets, said Dr. Roger Gold, an AgriLife Research entomologist at Texas A&M’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences in College Station.

“While drought conditions have made life more difficult for insects dependent on standing water for their survival, people should not be lulled into a false sense of security by their apparent absence,” Gold noted.

“While most of the state has had a respite from mosquitoes due to lack of rain, it won’t take long for them to proliferate as soon as some areas get a little much-needed moisture,” Gold said. “This is particularly true of what we call floodplain mosquitoes, whose eggs can withstand drought and are able to produce a new generation just 10 days after a rain.”

He added that now is the optimum time for people to dispose of any outdoor containers, bottles, jugs or other receptacles, as well as tires and other items that might trap standing water and provide a potential breeding ground for mosquitoes after a rain.

“People may also be deceived by the fact that they’re not seeing much termite activity, but termites are still there and we’ll likely start seeing swarms of them again shortly after a rain,” he said.

Gold noted the same is true of fire ants.

“Just because people aren’t seeing as many mounds, they shouldn’t assume their fire ant problems have been resolved. The mounds will pop up again and ants will be on the surface again once there’s enough moisture.”

“However, I’m sure most people in the state would gladly endure a few mosquito or fire ant bites if these came about as the result of a good rain,” he added.


Herb gardens the hottest trend for 2011

W. Atlee Burpee & Co.

America’s home gardeners are having a fragrant and picturesque love affair with herbs, according to national garden company W. Atlee Burpee & Co. The First Lady’s White House garden may well be an inspiration.

The 2011 White House vegetable garden features an array of edible garden delights, including peas, carrots, tomatoes and lettuces. But what has grabbed gardeners’ interest? The first lady’s impressive selection of herbs and companion flowers that line the garden’s winding paths between the raised vegetable beds.

“Interest in herbs has been growing steadily the last few years,” says Burpee Chairman and CEO George Ball. “But this year herbs are all the rage. Herb orders really took off right after the late March news reports about the 2011 White House garden.”

Using sales data, surveys and proprietary information sources, Burpee reports that herb gardens represent the top garden trend for the 2011 season, followed closely by raised bed gardens and container vegetable gardens. As a leading garden brand, Burpee actively monitors developments in the horticulture industry and consumer trends.

“Today’s garden consumers look for plants that perform double duty,” says Ball, “plants delicious to taste and pleasing to look at.”

Herbs are rewarding, summer long pleasers, according to Chelsey Fields, manager for Burpee’s edible division. “Most herbs are exceptionally easy to grow, and fun because they inspire and transform your cooking.”

Fields notes that herbs are great starter plants for children who are novice gardeners. In step with the first lady’s “Let’s Move” initiative that promotes healthier living and eating for children, kids who garden alongside their parents are healthier eaters.

“Herbs are low-maintenance. Some bright sun and water will keep the plants producing,” Fields continues. “The different tastes, flower colors and leaf types create a wonderfully interesting garden. Herbs attract all kinds of beneficial insects that will delight young entomologists-gardeners. The best thing is that kids help grow what’s for dinner.”


Grow a green and more eco-friendly lawn

By Melinda Myers
Gardening Writer

You can have your grass and be kind to the environment too. It’s just a matter of changing your lawn care practices.

Proper mowing, watering, and fertilization can be the difference between a healthy lawn and a weed patch. Raise the mowing height of your lawn, if haven’t already done so. Grow cool season grasses like bluegrass, fescue and ryegrass 2-1/2 to 3-1/2 inches tall. Warm season grasses like bermudagrass, carpetgrass, centipedegrass and zoysia should be grown at 1 to 2 inches tall, while St. Augustine should a bit higher, 2 to 3 inches, for best results. Taller grass is better able to compete with weeds.

Mow often, removing no more than one third the total height, in order to reduce stress on the grass. Leave the clippings on the lawn. A season’s worth of clippings equals one fertilizer application. And make sure the blade is sharp for a better look and quicker recovery of the grass. Consider using a push or electric mower. It’s good for the waistline and the environment.

Proper watering helps keep your lawn healthy and better able to fend off pests and out-compete the weeds. But recent droughts, increased water rates, and efforts to conserve water may mean a change of habit. Allow your lawn to go dormant during drought. Minimize foot traffic and play on dormant lawns. Don’t apply herbicides or fertilizer to dormant lawns. The fertilizer will feed the weeds and both can damage the dormant grass.

Those starting a new lawn may want to select a more drought tolerant grass suited to their climate. Rhizomatous (turf-type) tall fescue uses less water and needs less fertilizer than traditional lawn grasses. The native buffalo grass is a more drought tolerant slow growing warm season grass. It is slow to germinate and establishes and thrives in hot weather. And those with very limited annual rainfall should consider drought tolerant native groundcovers and plantings.

Before fertilizing always start with a soil test so you apply the right type and amount of fertilizer for your lawn. Use a low nitrogen slow release fertilizer.

Always sweep grass clippings and fertilizer residue off your walks and drives. This simple step keeps unwanted nutrients out of our waterways and eventually drinking water.

Melinda Myers has 30 years of horticulture experience and has written more than 20 gardening books, including Can’t Miss Small Space Gardening. Learn more by visiting www.melindamyers.com.


Don’t eat the plants

University of Cambridge

Are plants as defenseless as they appear? See the world how the plants do, as Professor John Parker explores how plants — the “great chemists of this world” — have evolved strategies to defend themselves against herbivores.

The latest video from the University of Cambridge shows how plants use hairs, spikes and chemicals to improve their survival and reproduction by reducing the impact of herbivores.

The film can be seen using the following link: http://www.cam.ac.uk/research/video-and-audio/cambridge-ideas-dont-eat-the-plants/.


The compost heap
Tomatillo in Burleson County

"Can you tell me the best variety of tomatillo seed to plant in Burleson County?" asks Frances Pullin.

We have had good luck with Toma Verde. It produces fairly large fruit. — Chris Corby, publisher


Gardening tips

Grasshoppers are worse in a dry year like we are having now and often invade home gardens and irrigated landscapes after they have devoured nearby fields and pastures. While total control is next to impossible, you can protect your valuable plants by covering them with fiber row cover.

Have a favorite gardening tip you’d like to share? Texas Gardener’s Seeds is seeking brief gardening tips from Texas gardeners to use in future issues. If we publish your tip in Seeds, we will send you a free Texas Gardener 2011 Planning Guide & Calendar. Please send your tips of 50 words or less to the editor at: Gardening Tips.


Did you know...

Did you know that grapes, except for muscadine varieties, are self fertile and do not require another variety for pollination.


Upcoming garden events.

If you would like your organization’s events included in "Upcoming Garden Events" or would like to make a change to a listed event, please contact us at Garden Events. To ensure inclusion in this column, please provide complete details at least three weeks prior to the event.

San Antonio: The Composter Training by Lou Kellogg and the Bexar County Master Gardeners is back is scheduled for June 22-24 in San Antonio. Topics include building a compost bin, hands-on lessons in how to compost, a visit to the state's largest compost operation, soils science, and presentations from leading compost experts. The classes will he held on the grounds of the San Antonio Botanical Gardens. This intensive multi-day training empowers Master Gardeners with knowledge and skills to support and multiply Texas AgriLife Extension Service efforts in Earth-Kind educational programs in their counties. Attendance is limited to Master Gardeners. The fee is $225 for the classes and meals. For more information and an application contact David Rodriguez, County Extension Agent - Horticulture at 210-467-6575 or dhrodriguez@ag.tamu.edu.

Diboll: Texas Forest Service is offering a free workshop for landowners interested in growing longleaf pine on their property. Landowners & Longleaf: Growing Longleaf for Timber, Wildlife and Aesthetics will focus on longleaf history and management, establishment needs and financial assistance. It also will cover prescribed burning, wildlife management, seedling availability and National Wild Turkey Federation Assistance. “Interest in longleaf pine is growing daily,” said Texas Forest Service Forester and Farm Bill Coordinator Shane Harrington. “This is really a great opportunity for folks who are interested in establishing longleaf pine on their property to learn more about proper management and assistance programs.” The workshop is scheduled for 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. on Thursday, June 23, at the Diboll Civic Center, 601 Dennis Street, Diboll. Though the workshop is free, registration is required. Please RSVP by June 16 to Harrington at 254-742-9874 or sharrington@tfs.tamu.edu. Lunch will be provided. Pesticide applicators as well as members of the Society of American Foresters and Association of Consulting Foresters who attend the workshop will earn Continuing Education Units and Continuing Forestry Education hours.

Leander: Residents in the Leander area interested in learning how to protect themselves from wildfire are invited to a town hall meeting at 7 p.m. Friday, June 24, at Leander City Hall, 201 North Brushy, Leander. Representatives from Texas Forest Service and area fire departments will be on hand to answer questions and talk about what residents can do to protect their home, property and family from the devastation of wildfire. Residents will be introduced to the Ready, Set, Go! personal wildfire action plan during this meeting. The plan provides checklists for families to work through so that there is a clear understanding of what to do when a fire breaks out in your area. The plan also outlines ways to protect structures from wildfire. For example, you can reduce potential losses by adopting Firewise landscaping practices 100 to 200 feet around your home. That includes moving firewood and clearing dead and dense vegetation. Wildland Urban Interface Specialist Lexi Maxwell stressed that wildfires are a community-wide problem, which means reducing risks to homes and property is everyone’s responsibility. “More than 80 percent of wildfires in Texas occur within 2 miles of a community,” Maxwell said, reminding residents that recent wildfires have raged through the area and likely will again. The wildfire facts for this year are staggering. More than 3 million acres of Texas land have burned in 166 counties reaching across the entire state. For more information, visit www.texasfirestorm.org and www.texasfirewise.org.

San Antonio: “First Aid for Landscape during Drought – Help Your Landscape get through these dry times,” An Earth-Kind Landscape Series, will be presented by The Bexar County Master Gardener “Water Conservation” Team and David Rodriguez, County Extension Agent-Horticulture with Texas AgriLife Extension Service Monday, June 27, from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. at: San Antonio Garden Center, 3310 N New Braunfels, San Antonio (the corner of Funston Road and North New Braunfels). Special care and preventive measures are need now to get your landscape through this third worst drought in South Texas. This seminar will feature topics including irrigation efficiency, drip irrigation, making and using compost and mulch and the use of Texas Superstar plant material. Free admission. For more information, call 210-467-6575.

Amarillo: Landowners in Potter and Randall counties who have been affected by recent wildfires are invited to a workshop June 28 to learn how to restore their land in the aftermath of a disaster. Almost 3 million acres of Texas land have burned since wildfire season started on Nov. 15, 2010. “We want to let citizens know what resources are available to them as they recover from these tragic wildfires,” said Brian Scott, a forester with Texas Forest Service. The informational “After the Fire” workshop will be from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday, June 28, at the GRIT Center, 8827 South Washington, Amarillo. Registration starts at 9:30 a.m. Representatives from partnering agencies – Texas Forest Service, Natural Resources Conservation Service, Farm Service Agency and Texas AgriLife Extension Service – will be on hand to help answer questions. Topics include native grass recovery and soils, cost share programs and “Firewise” safety principles. Lunch will be provided. RSVP to http://texasconservation.org or to Forester Brian Scott at 806-316-6560.

Bryan: Henry Flowers, Garden Director, Festival Hill, will discuss Sir Joseph Banks, the 18th century nobleman who had a passion for plants and botany that led him to become one of the most influential men during one of the greatest ages of scientific study and discovery, from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Tuesday, June 28, at The Brazos Center, 3232 Briarcrest Drive, Bryan. This event is open to the public at no charge. Program begins at 7 p.m. doors open at 6:45 p.m. (Please respect that a "for members only" business meeting of the Brazos County Master Gardener Association precedes the program.) For additional information, call 979-823-0129 or visit brazosmg.com.

Christoval: Residents in the San Angelo area interested in learning how to protect themselves from wildfire are invited to a Christoval town hall meeting later this month. The meeting is set for 7 p.m. Tuesday, June 28, at the Christoval Community Center, roughly 20 miles south of San Angelo. Representatives from Texas Forest Service and the Christoval Fire Department will be on hand to answer questions and talk about what residents can do to protect their home, property and family from the devastation of wildfire. Residents will be introduced to the Ready, Set, Go! personal wildfire action plan during this meeting. The plan provides checklists for families to work through so that there is a clear understanding of what to do when a fire breaks out in your area. The plan also outlines ways to protect structures from wildfire. For example, you can reduce potential losses by adopting Firewise landscaping practices 100 to 200 feet around your home. That includes moving firewood and clearing dead and dense vegetation. Wildland Urban Interface Specialist Patrick Allen stressed that wildfires are a community-wide problem, which means reducing risks to homes and property is everyone’s responsibility. “More than 80 percent of wildfires in Texas occur within 2 miles of a community,” Allen said, reminding residents that recent wildfires have raged through the area and likely will again. The wildfire facts for this year are staggering. From a report released by the Texas Forest Service on June 14, approximately 2,904,807 acres of Texas land have burned in 166 counties reaching across the entire state. More than 1,842 structures have been lost including 474 homes, while 22,947 structures have been saved through the efforts of local, state and federal fire resources. “This year has been an eye-opening experience for many Texas residents and we are not out of the woods yet,” Allen said referring to the worst drought Texas has experienced in almost a century. “Our goal is to empower residents with the appropriate tools and knowledge to take a proactive approach to the rest of this wildfire season.” For more information, visit www.texasfirestorm.org and www.texasfirewise.org.

Mount Pleasant: Tuesday, July 5, The Lake Country chapter of NPSOT will be hosting Michael Warriner, invertebrate biologist for Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, as the featured speaker. He will be discussing the Colony Collapse Disorder of European honeybees, the decline in numbers of native bees and ways we can promote backyard habitat for them. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. at the Titus County AgriLife building, 1708 North Industrial Blvd., Mount Pleasant.

Highland Lakes: Spring Gardening is good practice for having a successful fall garden. The plants are different but fall gardening is a real treat. Fall is the best time to plant almost everything, not only vegetables but herbs, shrubs, trees and more in your garden. Highland Lakes Master Gardener Sheryl Yantis will discuss fall gardening topics that will help improve your Hill Country garden in a Green Thumb program "Tips for a Successful Fall Garden" presented free by the Lakeshore Library, 7346 Hwy 261, Buchanan Dam, on Tuesday, July 12 at 2:30 p.m.. Please call the Lakeshore Library at 325- 379-1174 to reserve your spot for this free program.

Seabrook: Dr. Carol Brouwer will present a lecture on Landscape Design from 6:30 p.m. until 9 p.m., Tuesday, July 12, at The Meeting Room at Clear Lake Park (on the lake side), 5001 NASA Parkway, Seabrook. This lecture is free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://harris-tx.tamu.edu/hort/greenthumb.htm.

Austin: Central Texas weather is presenting more challenges than usual in the landscape, especially with lawns. Master Gardener, Jerry Naiser will provide solutions for growing a healthy lawn. Topics will include choosing the right type of turf for soil conditions, irrigation, fertilization, proper mowing techniques and how to diagnose and treat pests and diseases. “Central Texas Lawn Care” will be presented Thursday, July 14, from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m., at Zilker Botanical Garden, 2220 Barton Springs Rd., Austin. For more information, contact the Master Gardeners Help Line at 512-854-9600. This seminar is presented by the Travis County Master Gardeners, a volunteer arm of the Texas AgriLife Extension Service in Travis County. www.tcmastergardeners.org.

Austin: “Joys of Container Gardening” will be presented from 10 a.m. until noon, Friday, July 15, at AgriLife Extension Office, 1600-B Smith Rd, Austin. Blooming flowers and vegetables can thrive in a container! This gardening method is especially useful if space is limited. Containers may also serve as accent points on the patio or in the garden. Learn how to select a container and the right soil, discover ideal container plants, and witness arranging techniques you can replicate to create your own mini-garden. This seminar is free and open to the public. It is presented by the Travis County Master Gardeners, a volunteer arm of the Texas AgriLife Extension Service in Travis County. For more information, visit www.tcmastergardeners.org or call the Master Gardener Help Desk at 512- 854-9600.

Rockport: DJ Chilcoat, Master Gardener, and Jeanna C. Godfrey, DVM, Master Gardener, will present "Art in the Garden, from 11:30 a.m. until 12:30 p.m., Tuesday, July 19, at the Aransas County Library, 701 E. Mimosa, Rockport. For additional information, call 361-790-0103.

Seabrook: Mike Howlett, Project Manager for Harris County Precinct 4 Parks Department ,will speak on Carnivorous Plants at 10 a.m., Wednesday, July 20, at The Meeting Room at Clear Lake Park (on the lakeside), 5001 NASA Parkway, Seabrook. This lecture is free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://harris-tx.tamu.edu/hort.

Nacogdoches: Greg Grant leads "Everything you wanted to know about turf grass, but were afraid to ask" from 9 a.m. until noon, July 23, in Room 118, Ag Building, Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches. $10 members, $15 non-members. For more information or to make reservations, call 936-468-18312 or email erodewald@sfasu.edu.

Austin: Cooler weather gives you an opportunity to grow and enjoy food that flourishes in the fall and winter months. Broccoli, lettuce, Swiss chard, radishes and spinach are just a few of the favorites that grow well here. Join Master Gardener Patty Leander, a Texas Gardener contributing writer, to learn about these varieties and strategies for bringing a bountiful fall harvest to the table! “Fall Vegetable Gardening” will be presented Saturday, August 6, from 10 a.m. until noon, at Zilker Botanical Garden, 2220 Barton Springs Rd., Austin. For more information, contact the Master Gardeners Help Line at 512-854-9600. This seminar is presented by the Travis County Master Gardeners, a volunteer arm of the Texas AgriLife Extension Service in Travis County. www.tcmastergardeners.org.

Rockport: Marthanne Mitch, Master Gardener, will present "Butterfly Gardens" from noon until 1 p.m., Tuesday, August 16, at the Aransas County Library, 701 E. Mimosa, Rockport. For additional information, call (361)-790-0103.

Cibolo: Do you have a love for gardening and want to learn more about horticulture? Then the next Guadalupe County Master Gardener training class is for you. Classes are on Wednesdays, August 24 to December 7 from noon to 4:30 p.m. at St Paul Evangelical Church, 108 S Main, Cibolo. Learn from Texas A&M AgriLife Extension specialists, staff and local experts. Topics cover botany and plant growth, entomology, Xeriscaping, propagation, herbs and vegetables, tree care and pruning principles, composting and organic horticulture, water conservation and much more. Registration is $170 with a 10% discount if received by August 1. For more information, visit www.guadalupecountymastergardeners.org or contact Jose Antonio Contreras, elmerojose@gmail.com, 830-401-0800.

Nacogdoches: Greg Grant leads "Landscape Design" from 9 a.m. until noon, September 10, in Room 118, Ag Building, Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches. $15 members, $20 non-members. For more information or to make reservations, call 936-468-18312 or email erodewald@sfasu.edu.

Conroe: The Montgomery County Master Gardener Association is pleased to present Greg Grant, Horticulturist, Plant Propagator and Humorist on Tuesday, October 4. The program will start at 7 p.m. and will be held at the Thomas LeRoy Education Center, 9020 Airport Road, Conroe, which is across the street from the Lone Star Convention Center. Greg is a contributor to Texas Gardener Magazine, among others, and his topic for the evening will be Home Landscaping — Texas: Right Plant, Right Place. His talk will include basic landscaping design principles as well as some of his favorite plants. This is a rare opportunity to see one of Texas’ best gardening speakers in a local setting. The fee will be $20.00 per person and seating will be limited. Please call 936-539-7824 Monday through Friday for more information, or visit www.montgomerycountymastergardeners.org. There will also be information available about the Montgomery County Master Gardeners’ Fall Plant Sale at this event, which will be held Saturday, October 15, from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m.

MONTHLY MEETINGS

Houston: The Harris County Master Gardeners meet at noon the first Tuesday of each month at the Texas AgriLife Extension, 3033 Bear Creek Drive (near the intersection of Highway 6 and Patterson Road), Houston. For additional information visit http://hcmga.tamu.edu or call 281-855-5600.

Rockport: Rockport: Monthly meetings of the Aransas/San Patricio Master Gardeners are held at 10 a.m. on the first Tuesday of each month at Texas AgriLife Extension Service - Aransas County Office, 611 E. Mimosa, Rockport. For additional information, e-mail aransas-tx@tamu.edu or call 361-790-0103.

Kilgore: Northeast Texas Organic Gardeners meets at 1 p.m. on the first Wednesday of each month. For more information, call Carole Ramke at 903-986-9475.

Allen: The Allen Garden Club meets at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month, February through December, at the Allen Heritage Center, 100 E. Main St., Allen. For more information, visit www.allengardenclub.org.

Brownwood: The Brown County Master Gardeners Association meets the first Thursday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 605 Fisk Ave., Brownwood. For further information, call Mary Green Engle at 325-784-8453.

Austin: Austin Organic Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. on the second Monday of each month at the Zilker Botanical Gardens in Austin. For more information, visit www.main.org/aog.

Marion: The Guadalupe County (Schertz/Seguin) Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets on the second Tuesday of each month except July and August at The Library, 500 Bulldog, Marion. There is a plant exchange and meet-and-greet begins at 6:30 p.m. followed by the program at 7 p.m. Visitors are welcome. For more information or an application to join NPSOT visit www.npsot.org/GuadalupeCounty/ or contact contact guadalupecounty@npsot.org.

Rockport: The Rockport Herb & Rose Study Group, founded in March 2003, meets the second Wednesday of each month at 10 a.m. at 619 N. Live Oak Street, Room 14, Rockport, to discuss all aspects of using and growing herbs, including historical uses and tips for successful propagation and cultivation. Sometimes they take field trips and have cooking demonstrations in different locations. For more information, contact Linda 361-729-6037, Ruth 361-729-8923 or Cindy 979-562-2153 or visit www.rockportherbs.org and http://rockportherbies.blogspot.com.

Beaumont: The Jefferson County Master Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the AgriLife Extension Office, 1225 Pearl Street, Suite 200, Beaumont. For more information, call 409-835-8461.

Brownwood: Brown County Master Gardeners Association meets the second Thursday of each month, from Noon to 1 p.m., at the Brown County AgriLife Extension Office, 605 Fisk, Brownwood. For additional information, call Freda Day 325-643-1077, or Mary Engle 325-784-8453.

Georgetown: The Williamson County Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the Georgetown Public Library, 402 W. 8th Street. Georgetown. For additional information, contract Billye Adams at 512-863-9636 or visit http://www.npsot.org/WilliamsonCounty/default.htm.

Orange: The Orange County Master Gardeners meet at the Salvation Army in Orange on the second Thursday of each month. A covered-dish dinner at 6:30 p.m. is followed by a speaker and business meeting at 7 p.m.

San Antonio: The San Antonio Herb Society meets at 7 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month at the San Antonio Garden Center, 3310 N. New Braunfels (corner of Funston & N. New Braunfels). For more information on programs, visit www.sanantonioherbs.org.

Dallas: The Rainbow Garden Club of North Texas meets the second Sunday of each month at 2 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Meetings are held at member’s homes and garden centers around the area. For more information, visit www.RainbowGardenClub.com.

Arlington: The Arlington Men's Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the third Monday of each month (except December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact Lance Jepson at LJepson@aol.com.

Cleburne: The Johnson County Master Gardeners meet at 2 p.m. on the third Monday of each month at McGregor House, 1628 W. Henderson, Cleburne, which includes a program and a meet & greet. For more information, call Diane Asberry at 817-558-3932.

Sugar Land: The Sugar Land Garden Club meets on the third Tuesday of each month, September through November and January through April at 10 a.m. at the Sugar Land Community Center, 226 Matlage Way, Sugar Land. The club hosts a different speaker each month. For more information, visit www.sugarlandgardenclub.org.

Denton: The Denton Organic Society, a group devoted to sharing information and educating the public regarding organic principles, meets the third Wednesday of each month (except July, August and December) at the Denton Senior Center, 509 N. Bell Avenue. Meetings are free and open to the public. Meetings begin at 7 p.m. and are preceded by a social at 6:30. For more information, call 940-382-8551.

Glen Rose: The Somervell County Master Gardeners meet at 10 a.m., the third Wednesday of each month at the Somervell County AgriLife Extension office, 1405 Texas Drive, Glen Rose. Visitors are welcome. For more information, call 254-897-2809 or visit www.somervellmastergardeners.org.

Granbury: The Lake Granbury Master Gardeners meet at 1 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at the Hood County Annex 1, 1410 West Pearl Street, Granbury. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program each month preceding the business meeting. For information on topics call 817-579-3280 or visit http://www.hoodcountymastergardeners.org/.

Seabrook: The Harris County Precinct 2 Master Gardeners hold an educational program at 10 a.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at The Meeting Room at Clear Lake Park (on the Lakeside), 5001 NASA Road 1, Seabrook. The programs are free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu.

Houston: The Native Plant Society of Texas — Houston (NPSOT-H) meets at 7 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except for October (4th Thursday) and December (2nd Thursday). Location varies. For locations, for more information on programs, and for information about native plants for Houston, visit http://www.npsot.org/Houston.

Rosenberg: The Fort Bend Master Gardeners meet at 7:00 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except December at the Bud O’Shieles Community Center located at 1330 Band Road, Rosenberg. For more information, call 281-341-7068 or visit www.fbmg.com.

Seguin: The Guadalupe County Master Gardeners meets at 7 p.m. the third Thursday of each month, except December, at the Texas AgriLife Extension Bldg. at 210 E. Live Oak, Seguin. An educational program precedes the business meeting. The public is invited to attend. For topic or other information, call 830-379-1972 or visit www.guadalupecountymastergardeners.org.

Atlanta: The Caddo Wildflower Chapter of Native Plants Society meets the fourth Tuesday of each month at the Horne Enterprise building in Atlanta at 7 p.m. Visitors are welcome. For additional information, contact Kay Lowery at frostkay268@aol.com.

Brackenridge Park: The Native Plant Society San Antonio Chapter meets every fourth Tuesday of each month at 7:00 p.m. in the Lions Field Adult and Senior Center, 2809 Broadway at E. Mulberry, Brackenridge Park, except August and December. Social and seed/plant exchange at 6:30 p.m. Free and open to the public. For more information, contact Bea at 210-999-7292 or visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio.

Edna: The Jackson County Master Gardeners present their "Come Grown With Us" seminars on the fourth Tuesday of each month, January through October, beginning at 7 p.m. at 411 N. Wells, Edna. The seminars are free, open to the public and offer 2 CEU hours to Master Gardeners or others requiring them. For additional information, contact the Jackson County Extension Office at 361-782-3312.

Fort Worth: The Organic Garden Club of Forth Worth meets at 7 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday of each month except July and December at the Fort Worth Botanic Gardens main building. Refreshments are served. For more information, call 817-274-8460.

San Antonio: The Native Plant Society of Texas San Antonio Chapter meets the fourth Tuesday of the month, except August and December, at the Lions Field Adult & Senior Center, 2809 Broadway, San Antonio. Social and plant/seed exchange at 6:30 p.m., program at 7:00 p.m. For more information, visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio or call Bea at 210-999-7292.

Leander: The Leander Garden Club meets on the fourth Thursday of each month (except July and August) at 10:30 a.m. at the Leander Presbyterian Church, 101 N. West Drive, Leander, unless there is a field trip or an event at a member's home. Following a short business meeting, there is usually a program, followed by a shared pot-luck luncheon. To confirm the meeting place and time, please call Cathy Clark-Ramsey at 512-963-4698 or email texascatalina@yahoo.com.

Dallas: The Dallas Organic Garden Club meets at 2:30 p.m. on the fourth Sunday of each month at the North Haven Gardens, 7700 Northaven Rd., Dallas. For more information, call 214-824-2448 or visit www.dogc.org.

Arlington: The Arlington Organic Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the last Thursday of each month (except November and December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact David at 817) 483-7746.


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Texas Gardener’s Seeds is published weekly. © Suntex Communications, Inc. 2011. All rights reserved. You may forward this publication to your friends and colleagues if it is sent in its entirety. No individual part of this newsletter may be reproduced in any manner without prior written permission from the publisher.

Missed an issue? Back issues of Texas Gardener’s Seeds are available at www.texasgardener.com/newsletters.

Publisher: Chris S. Corby ● Editor: Michael Bracken

Texas Gardener’s Seeds, P.O. Box 9005, Waco, Texas 76714 ● www.TexasGardener.com