July 6, 2011

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Unusual objects can contribute to garden design. (Photo by William Scheick)

The garden reader:
Thinking about garden design

By William Scheick
Book Reviewer

Chris Young. Best Garden Design: Practical Inspiration from the Royal Horticulture Society Chelsea Flower Show. Firefly Books, 2010. 224 pp. $35.00.

I am never satisfied with how my gardens look, and I suspect that I never will be.

The problem isn’t just my unruly huskies crashing into bushes, snapping off branches to chew like bones, dozing on and crushing any available ground cover, and then digging random potholes in search of insects or to cool their bellies. All of that’s a story begging to be told, of course, but not today.

The fact is that my dissatisfaction with garden design includes the front yard as well as the fenced portion of the backyard protected from my ravaging canines.

The main problem with these pet-protected areas is that even after considerable thought and labor, nature can so easily undo my grandest schemes. Actually, recent years of record-breaking heat and drought, resulting in year-round local water restrictions, have tended to do far worse than merely fray my best-laid garden plans.

So I am always on the lookout for ideas on how to better my odds against nature or, at least, to improve the overall appearance of my fenced-in and front-yard gardens.

A lush “romantic” design is very appealing but hard to pull off in my Central Texas area. Romantic landscaping, according to Chris Young in Best Garden Design, features “an abundance of planting” that evokes “a feeling of femininity and sumptuousness.”

Sounds great, but that’s not going to happen in my home landscape. Nor is some version of “classic” design based on antique European garden models.

Like many of my neighbors, though, I have pretty much riffed on what Young describes as a “Mediterranean” design: “simple colors, bright flowers and bold foliage … succulent plants or cacti, outdoor furniture and shade-giving trees.”

A few of my neighbors have gone “minimalist,” which the author of Best Garden Design designates as controversial because “it polarizes popular opinion.” Yes, it can, indeed.

But even if sometimes the word on the street might amount to grumbles about a neighbor accused of having gone too minimalistic — perhaps with a stark crushed-stone front yard — we have to admire the low maintenance and cost efficiency of such pared-down designs.

What Young terms “Arabic” design is very appealing. I love its stonewalls, tiles, small trees used as vertical accents — all arranged in ways hinting at some geometric order redressing the unruly welter that is raw nature’s bottom line.

In featuring award-winning variations on these five patterns (as displayed at the Chelsea Flower Show from 2004 to 2009), Best Garden Design offers chapters on entrances, pathways, boundaries, water features, mixed media, lighting and art/object placement. Especially helpful is the chapter on sustainability, including recycling water and green roofs.

My favorite section provides insights into combining the softness of plants and the hardness of various materials, ranging from very unusual items to typically familiar stone structures. It is possible, for instance, to have walls that “breathe and grow” by designing them with dirt-retaining tops where shrubs can be planted.


6 tips for gardening with limited space and money

By Andrea Woroch
Consumer Savings Expert

Gardening is an addiction, and so is the desire to eat freshly picked produce. Yet apartment living, shrinking yards and expanding garages leave many without enough room to create even a small garden. To enjoy summer's bounty, we ultimately resort to the higher prices of farmers markets or natural food stores and, even then, the produce often doesn't have that unbeatable fresh flavor.

So what's a fresh-food addict to do? Here are six ways to work around space limitations that will fulfill your addiction without requiring a major cash outlay.

1. Found Space. Even the tiniest yard should contain nooks and crannies where you can plant tomatoes, green onions, carrots, and more. You might have to replace or fertilize the soil, but that's inexpensive and easy to do when dealing with an itty-bitty plot.

2. Container Gardening. Many plants lend themselves to container gardening, particularly herbs. Considering the price of grocery-store herbs, this is one tip well worth pursuing. Search thrift stores for used pots and don't be afraid to go creative. Lots of other items — like buckets and baskets — can make excellent planters. If the container has no drainage outlet, either punch holes near the bottom or add a layer of rocks. If you're not the eclectic type then consider shopping online for planters. Home and garden coupon codes are often readily available to your favorite gardening stores.

Other plants that work well in containers include broccoli, leaf lettuce, spinach and green onions. Variety selection is extremely important, however. Most varieties that will do well when planted in a yard garden will also do well in containers.

3. Community Gardens. Even major cities now offer community gardens, where you can carve out a plot of your own. Some charge a small fee, so consider the return on your investment before buying in. Keep in mind that running back and forth to a community garden makes the process more difficult, so plan your visits to coincide with weeding and menu needs.

4. Ask Your Neighbors. Do you have a friends with plenty of room but no interest in gardening? Work out a trade deal in which you provide them with produce in exchange for their land. You might also offer to teach your neighbor how to garden, so you'll have more help next year. Make sure you agree beforehand on the crops you'll grow and who will pay for starts and supplies.

5. Hanging Planters. As they increase in popularity, hanging tomatoes are available both online and in stores. But tomatoes aren't the only edible that can grow while aloft. Herbs, onions, spinach and other small crops grow well with minimal earth, as long as you fertilize them. Of course, flowers grow equally well in hanging baskets, if you're so inclined. Watch for coupons to garden centers and receive savings on small crops and hanging planters.

6. Traffic Island Flower Gardens. Adopt a local traffic island or roadside property and create a flower garden that will fulfill your floral green-thumb desires. You may not be able to harvest your crops, but you'll have the pleasure of beautifying a street and enjoying the garden every time you drive past. Seattle is exploring such a program, which they call "We Patch". Your city may have already caught on to this trend, so check with a government representative.

Consumer Savings Expert Andrea Woroch has been featured on NBC's Today Show, FOX & Friends, MSNBC, and ABC News NOW. For more savings tips follow @AndreaWoroch.


Organic agriculture's resilience shows untapped potential

Worldwatch Institute

Despite the crippling effects of the recent economic slowdown on many industries, the organic agriculture sector not only sustained itself during this period but also showed signs of growth. "In 2009, organic farming was practiced on 37.2 million hectares worldwide, a 5.7 percent increase from 2008 and 150 percent increase since 2000," writes policy analyst E.L. Beck, in the latest Vital Signs Online release from the Worldwatch Institute.

The International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements (IFOAM) defines organic agriculture as: "a production system that sustains the health of soils, ecosystems and people. It relies on ecological processes, biodiversity and cycles adapted to local conditions, rather than the use of inputs with adverse effects. Organic agriculture combines tradition, innovation and science to benefit the shared environment."

Although organic agriculture is practiced around the world, certified organic agriculture tends to be concentrated in wealthier countries. The Group of 20 (G20), comprising both developing and industrialized countries, is home to 89 percent of the global certified organic agricultural area. But nongovernmental organizations, including Slow Food International and ACDI/VOCA, are working with farmers to promote organic agriculture in developing countries as a means of bettering livelihoods and rejuvenating the land.

In western Tanzania, organic agroforestry practices have helped rehabilitate some 350,000 hectares of desert land over the span of two decades. And in Ethiopia, coffee farmers are learning how to protect wild coffee plants, fertilize them using organic compost, and process them in a manner that retains the quality of the crop, without damaging the environment.

Although the global organic market has shown growth in the past few years, the rate has slowed since 2000, and there are several challenges that impede large-scale expansion of organic practices. The price premium on organic foods, for example, may dissuade many consumers from buying organic products, despite the potential environmental, ethical, and health benefits these products provide.

Two other challenges are the lack of organic standards and the scarcity of equivalency agreements. An equivalency agreement between two countries acknowledges each other's organic standards and allows for a smooth flow of certified organic goods between the two countries. The Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation finances the Global Organic Market Access (GOMA) project, which facilitates the trade of organic products by establishing organic standards and negotiating equivalency agreements, but more progress is needed in this area.

Rising farmland prices are putting a further strain on organic agriculture. Research by the International Food Policy Research Institute shows that foreign investors have spent up to $20-30 billion on land purchases since 2006. These price hikes are threatening global food security and are especially detrimental to small-scale farmers' ability to enter the organic agriculture field.

Despite all these challenges, organic agriculture holds untapped potential for helping farmers and consumers alike build resilience to food price shocks, climate change, and water scarcity. By turning to organic agroforestry and switching from synthetic to organic fertilizers, farmers are not only raising their incomes by reducing input costs, but also adapting to the effects of climate change and helping to protect the environment.

"In order to keep feeding humanity for generations to come, and to feed people better, farming must reinforce conservation goals by adding diversity to the food chain and by healing ecosystems," said Danielle Nierenberg, Worldwatch senior researcher and co-director of the Institute's Nourishing the Planet project.

Worldwatch's Nourishing the Planet (www.NourishingthePlanet.org) project has traveled to 25 countries across sub-Saharan Africa, shining a spotlight on communities that serve as models for a more sustainable future. The project is unearthing innovations in agriculture that can help alleviate hunger and poverty while also protecting the environment.


The Compost Heap
Esperanza and Mirabilis jalapa

"I just read your most recent gardening tip about Esperanza being a good hardy plant for this dreadful weather ('Gardening Tips,' Seeds, June 29, 2011)," writes Karen Parker, "and I agree. The one in my front yard is doing well! I also have a Mirabilis jalapa, Four o'clock plant in the same section of garden and it has grown a few feet tall with little to no help from me this year! The blooms are often yellow, but I do get a few crazy pink ones, and it has seeds every day to harvest or let fall for next year's growth. The leaves do wilt in the heat to conserve energy, but the blooms are amazing. I would recommend this alongside your Esperanza in a flowerbed! With those two I also have dwarf Mexican petunias and Purple Heart, however depending on the location they can be invasive so I recommend those with a grain of salt. They all do great together in this weather."

Good advice, Karen. Thanks!—Chris S. Corby, publisher


Gardening tips

Are you having trouble getting those seeds to come in our unusually hot summer weather? Consider soaking your planting beds prior to planting seed. Also, cover the seedbed with shade cloth of other shade device until the seeds have emerged.

Have a favorite gardening tip you’d like to share? Texas Gardener’s Seeds is seeking brief gardening tips from Texas gardeners to use in future issues. If we publish your tip in Seeds, we will send you a free Texas Gardener 2011 Planning Guide & Calendar. Please send your tips of 50 words or less to the editor at: Gardening Tips.


Did you know...

If you have a healthy butterfly population in your garden it is important to protect that population by not using insecticides on your plants. Yes, there may be some leaf damage to your plants but that is just part of a healthy environment for butterflies.

 


Upcoming garden events.

If you would like your organization’s events included in "Upcoming Garden Events" or would like to make a change to a listed event, please contact us at Garden Events. To ensure inclusion in this column, please provide complete details at least three weeks prior to the event.

Highland Lakes: Spring Gardening is good practice for having a successful fall garden. The plants are different but fall gardening is a real treat. Fall is the best time to plant almost everything, not only vegetables but herbs, shrubs, trees and more in your garden. Highland Lakes Master Gardener Sheryl Yantis will discuss fall gardening topics that will help improve your Hill Country garden in a Green Thumb program "Tips for a Successful Fall Garden" presented free by the Lakeshore Library, 7346 Hwy 261, Buchanan Dam, on Tuesday, July 12 at 2:30 p.m.. Please call the Lakeshore Library at 325- 379-1174 to reserve your spot for this free program.

Seabrook: Dr. Carol Brouwer will present a lecture on Landscape Design from 6:30 p.m. until 9 p.m., Tuesday, July 12, at The Meeting Room at Clear Lake Park (on the lake side), 5001 NASA Parkway, Seabrook. This lecture is free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://harris-tx.tamu.edu/hort/greenthumb.htm.

Austin: Central Texas weather is presenting more challenges than usual in the landscape, especially with lawns. Master Gardener, Jerry Naiser will provide solutions for growing a healthy lawn. Topics will include choosing the right type of turf for soil conditions, irrigation, fertilization, proper mowing techniques and how to diagnose and treat pests and diseases. “Central Texas Lawn Care” will be presented Thursday, July 14, from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m., at Zilker Botanical Garden, 2220 Barton Springs Rd., Austin. For more information, contact the Master Gardeners Help Line at 512-854-9600. This seminar is presented by the Travis County Master Gardeners, a volunteer arm of the Texas AgriLife Extension Service in Travis County. www.tcmastergardeners.org.

Austin: “Joys of Container Gardening” will be presented from 10 a.m. until noon, Friday, July 15, at AgriLife Extension Office, 1600-B Smith Rd, Austin. Blooming flowers and vegetables can thrive in a container! This gardening method is especially useful if space is limited. Containers may also serve as accent points on the patio or in the garden. Learn how to select a container and the right soil, discover ideal container plants, and witness arranging techniques you can replicate to create your own mini-garden. This seminar is free and open to the public. It is presented by the Travis County Master Gardeners, a volunteer arm of the Texas AgriLife Extension Service in Travis County. For more information, visit www.tcmastergardeners.org or call the Master Gardener Help Desk at 512- 854-9600.

Rockport: DJ Chilcoat, Master Gardener, and Jeanna C. Godfrey, DVM, Master Gardener, will present "Art in the Garden, from 11:30 a.m. until 12:30 p.m., Tuesday, July 19, at the Aransas County Library, 701 E. Mimosa, Rockport. For additional information, call 361-790-0103.

Seabrook: Mike Howlett, Project Manager for Harris County Precinct 4 Parks Department ,will speak on Carnivorous Plants at 10 a.m., Wednesday, July 20, at The Meeting Room at Clear Lake Park (on the lakeside), 5001 NASA Parkway, Seabrook. This lecture is free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://harris-tx.tamu.edu/hort.

Nacogdoches: Greg Grant leads "Everything you wanted to know about turf grass, but were afraid to ask" from 9 a.m. until noon, July 23, in Room 118, Ag Building, Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches. $10 members, $15 non-members. For more information or to make reservations, call 936-468-18312 or email erodewald@sfasu.edu.

Austin: Cooler weather gives you an opportunity to grow and enjoy food that flourishes in the fall and winter months. Broccoli, lettuce, Swiss chard, radishes and spinach are just a few of the favorites that grow well here. Join Master Gardener Patty Leander, a Texas Gardener contributing writer, to learn about these varieties and strategies for bringing a bountiful fall harvest to the table! “Fall Vegetable Gardening” will be presented Saturday, August 6, from 10 a.m. until noon, at Zilker Botanical Garden, 2220 Barton Springs Rd., Austin. For more information, contact the Master Gardeners Help Line at 512-854-9600. This seminar is presented by the Travis County Master Gardeners, a volunteer arm of the Texas AgriLife Extension Service in Travis County. www.tcmastergardeners.org.

Rockport: Marthanne Mitch, Master Gardener, will present "Butterfly Gardens" from noon until 1 p.m., Tuesday, August 16, at the Aransas County Library, 701 E. Mimosa, Rockport. For additional information, call (361)-790-0103.

Cibolo: Do you have a love for gardening and want to learn more about horticulture? Then the next Guadalupe County Master Gardener training class is for you. Classes are on Wednesdays, August 24 to December 7 from noon to 4:30 p.m. at St Paul Evangelical Church, 108 S Main, Cibolo. Learn from Texas A&M AgriLife Extension specialists, staff and local experts. Topics cover botany and plant growth, entomology, Xeriscaping, propagation, herbs and vegetables, tree care and pruning principles, composting and organic horticulture, water conservation and much more. Registration is $170 with a 10% discount if received by August 1. For more information, visit www.guadalupecountymastergardeners.org or contact Jose Antonio Contreras, elmerojose@gmail.com, 830-401-0800.

Nacogdoches: Greg Grant leads "Landscape Design" from 9 a.m. until noon, September 10, in Room 118, Ag Building, Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches. $15 members, $20 non-members. For more information or to make reservations, call 936-468-18312 or email erodewald@sfasu.edu.

Conroe: The Montgomery County Master Gardener Association is pleased to present Greg Grant, Horticulturist, Plant Propagator and Humorist on Tuesday, October 4. The program will start at 7 p.m. and will be held at the Thomas LeRoy Education Center, 9020 Airport Road, Conroe, which is across the street from the Lone Star Convention Center. Greg is a contributor to Texas Gardener Magazine, among others, and his topic for the evening will be Home Landscaping — Texas: Right Plant, Right Place. His talk will include basic landscaping design principles as well as some of his favorite plants. This is a rare opportunity to see one of Texas’ best gardening speakers in a local setting. The fee will be $20.00 per person and seating will be limited. Please call 936-539-7824 Monday through Friday for more information, or visit www.montgomerycountymastergardeners.org. There will also be information available about the Montgomery County Master Gardeners’ Fall Plant Sale at this event, which will be held Saturday, October 15, from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m.

MONTHLY MEETINGS

Houston: The Harris County Master Gardeners meet at noon the first Tuesday of each month at the Texas AgriLife Extension, 3033 Bear Creek Drive (near the intersection of Highway 6 and Patterson Road), Houston. For additional information visit http://hcmga.tamu.edu or call 281-855-5600.

Rockport: Rockport: Monthly meetings of the Aransas/San Patricio Master Gardeners are held at 10 a.m. on the first Tuesday of each month at Texas AgriLife Extension Service - Aransas County Office, 611 E. Mimosa, Rockport. For additional information, e-mail aransas-tx@tamu.edu or call 361-790-0103.

Kilgore: Northeast Texas Organic Gardeners meets at 1 p.m. on the first Wednesday of each month. For more information, call Carole Ramke at 903-986-9475.

Allen: The Allen Garden Club meets at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month, February through December, at the Allen Heritage Center, 100 E. Main St., Allen. For more information, visit www.allengardenclub.org.

Brownwood: The Brown County Master Gardeners Association meets the first Thursday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 605 Fisk Ave., Brownwood. For further information, call Mary Green Engle at 325-784-8453.

Austin: Austin Organic Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. on the second Monday of each month at the Zilker Botanical Gardens in Austin. For more information, visit www.main.org/aog.

Marion: The Guadalupe County (Schertz/Seguin) Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets on the second Tuesday of each month except July and August at The Library, 500 Bulldog, Marion. There is a plant exchange and meet-and-greet begins at 6:30 p.m. followed by the program at 7 p.m. Visitors are welcome. For more information or an application to join NPSOT visit www.npsot.org/GuadalupeCounty/ or contact contact guadalupecounty@npsot.org.

Rockport: The Rockport Herb & Rose Study Group, founded in March 2003, meets the second Wednesday of each month at 10 a.m. at 619 N. Live Oak Street, Room 14, Rockport, to discuss all aspects of using and growing herbs, including historical uses and tips for successful propagation and cultivation. Sometimes they take field trips and have cooking demonstrations in different locations. For more information, contact Linda 361-729-6037, Ruth 361-729-8923 or Cindy 979-562-2153 or visit www.rockportherbs.org and http://rockportherbies.blogspot.com.

Beaumont: The Jefferson County Master Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the AgriLife Extension Office, 1225 Pearl Street, Suite 200, Beaumont. For more information, call 409-835-8461.

Brownwood: Brown County Master Gardeners Association meets the second Thursday of each month, from Noon to 1 p.m., at the Brown County AgriLife Extension Office, 605 Fisk, Brownwood. For additional information, call Freda Day 325-643-1077, or Mary Engle 325-784-8453.

Georgetown: The Williamson County Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the Georgetown Public Library, 402 W. 8th Street. Georgetown. For additional information, contract Billye Adams at 512-863-9636 or visit http://www.npsot.org/WilliamsonCounty/default.htm.

Orange: The Orange County Master Gardeners meet at the Salvation Army in Orange on the second Thursday of each month. A covered-dish dinner at 6:30 p.m. is followed by a speaker and business meeting at 7 p.m.

San Antonio: The San Antonio Herb Society meets at 7 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month at the San Antonio Garden Center, 3310 N. New Braunfels (corner of Funston & N. New Braunfels). For more information on programs, visit www.sanantonioherbs.org.

Dallas: The Rainbow Garden Club of North Texas meets the second Sunday of each month at 2 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Meetings are held at member’s homes and garden centers around the area. For more information, visit www.RainbowGardenClub.com.

Arlington: The Arlington Men's Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the third Monday of each month (except December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact Lance Jepson at LJepson@aol.com.

Cleburne: The Johnson County Master Gardeners meet at 2 p.m. on the third Monday of each month at McGregor House, 1628 W. Henderson, Cleburne, which includes a program and a meet & greet. For more information, call Diane Asberry at 817-558-3932.

Sugar Land: The Sugar Land Garden Club meets on the third Tuesday of each month, September through November and January through April at 10 a.m. at the Sugar Land Community Center, 226 Matlage Way, Sugar Land. The club hosts a different speaker each month. For more information, visit www.sugarlandgardenclub.org.

Denton: The Denton Organic Society, a group devoted to sharing information and educating the public regarding organic principles, meets the third Wednesday of each month (except July, August and December) at the Denton Senior Center, 509 N. Bell Avenue. Meetings are free and open to the public. Meetings begin at 7 p.m. and are preceded by a social at 6:30. For more information, call 940-382-8551.

Glen Rose: The Somervell County Master Gardeners meet at 10 a.m., the third Wednesday of each month at the Somervell County AgriLife Extension office, 1405 Texas Drive, Glen Rose. Visitors are welcome. For more information, call 254-897-2809 or visit www.somervellmastergardeners.org.

Granbury: The Lake Granbury Master Gardeners meet at 1 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at the Hood County Annex 1, 1410 West Pearl Street, Granbury. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program each month preceding the business meeting. For information on topics call 817-579-3280 or visit http://www.hoodcountymastergardeners.org/.

Seabrook: The Harris County Precinct 2 Master Gardeners hold an educational program at 10 a.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at The Meeting Room at Clear Lake Park (on the Lakeside), 5001 NASA Road 1, Seabrook. The programs are free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu.

Houston: The Native Plant Society of Texas — Houston (NPSOT-H) meets at 7 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except for October (4th Thursday) and December (2nd Thursday). Location varies. For locations, for more information on programs, and for information about native plants for Houston, visit http://www.npsot.org/Houston.

Rosenberg: The Fort Bend Master Gardeners meet at 7:00 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except December at the Bud O’Shieles Community Center located at 1330 Band Road, Rosenberg. For more information, call 281-341-7068 or visit www.fbmg.com.

Seguin: The Guadalupe County Master Gardeners meets at 7 p.m. the third Thursday of each month, except December, at the Texas AgriLife Extension Bldg. at 210 E. Live Oak, Seguin. An educational program precedes the business meeting. The public is invited to attend. For topic or other information, call 830-379-1972 or visit www.guadalupecountymastergardeners.org.

Atlanta: The Caddo Wildflower Chapter of Native Plants Society meets the fourth Tuesday of each month at the Horne Enterprise building in Atlanta at 7 p.m. Visitors are welcome. For additional information, contact Kay Lowery at frostkay268@aol.com.

Brackenridge Park: The Native Plant Society San Antonio Chapter meets every fourth Tuesday of each month at 7:00 p.m. in the Lions Field Adult and Senior Center, 2809 Broadway at E. Mulberry, Brackenridge Park, except August and December. Social and seed/plant exchange at 6:30 p.m. Free and open to the public. For more information, contact Bea at 210-999-7292 or visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio.

Edna: The Jackson County Master Gardeners present their "Come Grown With Us" seminars on the fourth Tuesday of each month, January through October, beginning at 7 p.m. at 411 N. Wells, Edna. The seminars are free, open to the public and offer 2 CEU hours to Master Gardeners or others requiring them. For additional information, contact the Jackson County Extension Office at 361-782-3312.

Fort Worth: The Organic Garden Club of Forth Worth meets at 7 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday of each month except July and December at the Fort Worth Botanic Gardens main building. Refreshments are served. For more information, call 817-274-8460.

San Antonio: The Native Plant Society of Texas San Antonio Chapter meets the fourth Tuesday of the month, except August and December, at the Lions Field Adult & Senior Center, 2809 Broadway, San Antonio. Social and plant/seed exchange at 6:30 p.m., program at 7:00 p.m. For more information, visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio or call Bea at 210-999-7292.

Leander: The Leander Garden Club meets on the fourth Thursday of each month (except July and August) at 10:30 a.m. at the Leander Presbyterian Church, 101 N. West Drive, Leander, unless there is a field trip or an event at a member's home. Following a short business meeting, there is usually a program, followed by a shared pot-luck luncheon. To confirm the meeting place and time, please call Cathy Clark-Ramsey at 512-963-4698 or email texascatalina@yahoo.com.

Dallas: The Dallas Organic Garden Club meets at 2:30 p.m. on the fourth Sunday of each month at the North Haven Gardens, 7700 Northaven Rd., Dallas. For more information, call 214-824-2448 or visit www.dogc.org.

Arlington: The Arlington Organic Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the last Thursday of each month (except November and December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact David at 817) 483-7746.


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In Greg's Garden:
A Pineywoods Perspective on Gardening, Nature and Family

An intimate and personal exploration of the life of one of Texas’s most beloved gardeners, In Greg’s Garden: A Pineywoods Perspective on Gardening, Nature and Family gathers in a single volume the first nine years of Greg Grant’s columns from Texas Gardener magazine.

Revised and updated from their original publication, these 54 essays reveal the heart and soul of a seventh generation native Texan who has devoted his entire life to gardening, nature and family. With degrees in floriculture and horticulture from Texas A&M University and extensive hands-on experience as a horticulturist with the Texas Agricultural Extension Service, Stephen F. Austin State University, Mercer Arboretum and San Antonio Botanical Gardens, Grant has successfully introduced dozens of plants to the Texas nursery industry, all while maintaining long-held family property and renovating the homes of his ancestors in Arcadia, Texas.

In Greg’s Garden: A Pineywoods Perspective on Gardening, Nature and Family is a must-read for every Texas gardener.

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Texas Gardener’s Seeds is published weekly. © Suntex Communications, Inc. 2011. All rights reserved. You may forward this publication to your friends and colleagues if it is sent in its entirety. No individual part of this newsletter may be reproduced in any manner without prior written permission from the publisher.

Missed an issue? Back issues of Texas Gardener’s Seeds are available at www.texasgardener.com/newsletters.

Publisher: Chris S. Corby ● Editor: Michael Bracken

Texas Gardener’s Seeds, P.O. Box 9005, Waco, Texas 76714 ● www.TexasGardener.com