October 12, 2011

Welcome to Texas Gardener’s Seeds, the weekly newsletter for Texas gardeners. Please do not reply to this e-mail because the sending address is not monitored. See the bottom of this newsletter for information on how to subscribe, unsubscribe, or contact the editor.


After the fire: Assessing pine tree damage in Bastrop County

By Holly Huffman
Communications Specialist
Texas Forest Service

Long before wildfire ravaged Bastrop County, drought had already begun to take its toll on the mighty pine trees that dot the landscape.

After one of the driest years on record, many broadleaved trees had gone into early dormancy, dropping their leaves and branches in an act of self-preservation, and normally-green pines were topped with dead, red needles.

Already stressed to the max, some trees simply couldn’t handle the extreme heat that radiated from the Bastrop Fire — a 34,000 acre blaze that has been dubbed the most destructive in state history after wiping out more than 1,500 homes earlier this month.

“The effects of fire on a tree are easy to see, but heat effects can be harder to spot,” said Clay Bales, staff forester with Texas Forest Service. “Identifying signs of damage will help a landowner determine whether a tree will survive.”

Assessing damaged trees can seem overwhelming, Bales said, but divvying them up in three different categories — likely to live, likely to die and questionable — can help with the process.

Likely to live

This category includes trees with mostly green needles and little-to-no black char on the stem (the center trunk or bole that starts at the ground and extends up to the top of the tree). You’ll need to watch your tree for several weeks as it can take that long for heat damage in the roots and stem to show up in the crown needles. If the needles are still green after several weeks, that’s a good sign.

Likely to die

This category includes trees with no green needles, black char more than half way up the stem on all sides, bark that’s been burned very thin or into the wood and burn-exposed roots.

Some trees may have needles in the crown that have been consumed by fire while others will have needles that have been scorched by the surrounding heat. When needles are yellow or red, they have been scorched and killed by heat. During the winter and in wetter times, trees can sometimes recover from this scorch. However, trees with little to no green needles will not recover now.

Be sure to closely inspect the black char on the stem. This is good indicator of tree mortality when it surrounds the stem, going most of the way up the tree. However, the outcome can be questionable when the black char is only on one side or in a narrow strip running up the tree.

Questionable

Questionable trees include those that appear to fit somewhere between the likely to live and likely to die category. These trees commonly have a mix of green and yellow or red needles and black char that doesn’t surround the stem except at the base. If a tree’s lower stem bark is black but that black can be peeled off, revealing thick fresh bark underneath, it could be considered questionable and may live.

You can also look to the soil for clues. If you see some organic matter on the ground around the tree and there is no circular, slow-burn hole around the stem (like a ditch dug in the soil around the stem), it could be considered questionable and may live.

When inspecting a questionable tree, look for clear or white resin seeping out of bark fissures. This may be an indicator that the xylem and phloem cells have ruptured. When this is found only partly around the stem, it could be considered questionable and may live.

Deciding whether or not to remove a questionable tree can be a tough decision for both landowners and professional tree care experts. If the tree is close to a house or other structure on which it might fall, removal should be considered.

If not, it may be feasible to wait and see if the tree makes a comeback. However, if you do leave the tree, make sure you have an access point for removal and are willing to pay the extra costs associated with removing a single tree.

For more information on managing your property, keeping it healthy and preventing wildfires, visit http://texasforestservice.tamu.edu.

Note: Endangered Houston Toad Habitat

Landowners with a potential endangered Houston toad habitat can find wildfire clean-up recommendations — Post-Wildfire Clean-up and Response in Houston Toad Habitat — on the Bastrop County website: www.co.bastrop.tx.us. Questions and concerns can be addressed by calling the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service at 512-490-0057.



Gulf Fritillary butterfly taking nectar on a Liatris pycnostachya (cattail gayfeather), a perennial that grows in this area in sunny, moist areas of the Gulf Coast prairies and marshes. (Photo by Carolyn Fannon)

Celebrate the heat and drought survivors!

The Native Plant Society Of Texas will kick off Texas Native Plant Week with its 31st Annual Fall Symposium, showcasing plants that naturally grow well in Texas climates and offering opportunities for everyone to learn about conserving and propagating Texas plant species, with activities Thursday, Oct. 13 – Sunday, Oct. 16, at the Omni Houston Hotel at Westside, 13210 Katy Freeway at Eldridge Parkway.

The NPSOT 31st Annual Fall Symposium, “Habitat CPR: Creating, Preserving and Restoring Native Habitats in a Changing World” has entertaining and educational exhibits, a native plant sale, flower arranging and photography competitions, a silent auction, expert speakers from across the state and field trips to native habitats in the Houston area.

For novices at growing Texas natives, the symposium introduces plants that succeed in the local climate and unique habitats in the Houston area. Those familiar with the importance of saving Texas native plants can explore the diverse components of the Texas coastal prairies and marshes and their significance as natural habitat.

Admission to exhibits and interactive children’s educational activities is free and open to the general public on Saturday, Oct. 15, from 1:30 to 5 p.m. Visitors may also buy native plants on Saturday, Oct. 15, from 1:30 to 5:00pm. See the full schedule at www.npsot.org/wp/symposium2011.

Symposium 2011 begins Thursday, Oct. 13 with on-the-way field trips for out-of-town attendees. All symposium registrants are invited to attend the welcome reception Thursday evening. On Friday and Saturday, leaders in the conservation of native plants will present. They include Fred Smeins, Ph.D., range ecology professor, Texas A&M University, the leading expert on Texas coastal prairies and marshes; John Jacob, Ph.D., professor and extension specialist, director of the Texas Coastal Watershed Program and co-author of “Texas Coastal Wetlands Guidebook”; Bill Neiman, founder and president, Native American Seed; Jaime Gonzalez, community education manager, Katy Prairie Conservancy and Mark Kramer, stewardship coordinator, Armand Bayou Nature Center.

The Saturday evening dinner, “Rooted in History,” is a highlight of the symposium featuring Matt Turner, author of “Remarkable Plants of Texas: Uncommon Accounts of Our Common Natives” and an exclusive screening of Wildflowers | Seeds of History. The dinner is open to the public with reservations.

Registration required for symposium and dinner. For more information, schedule and registration, visit www.npsot.org/wp/symposium2011.

For more information on Native Plant Week, visit http://www.wildflower.org/nativeplantweek/ and http://txnativeplantweek.wordpress.com.


Gardening tips

"When watering plants with a hose, stick your finger in the dirt," writes Fran Losey. "I discovered during this drought that the water does not necessarily hit the roots. I now carry a long bamboo stick and poke holes around plants needing water, even in pots. Success!"

Have a favorite gardening tip you’d like to share? Texas Gardener’s Seeds is seeking brief gardening tips from Texas gardeners to use in future issues. If we publish your tip in Seeds, we will send you a free Texas Gardener 2011 Planning Guide & Calendar. Please send your tips of 50 words or less to the editor at: Gardening Tips.


Did you know...

It is best to take cuttings or divide plants on a cool day, preferably in damp weather. This will cause less stress. Be sure to water the parent plant first.


Upcoming garden events.

If you would like your organization’s events included in "Upcoming Garden Events" or would like to make a change to a listed event, please contact us at Garden Events. To ensure inclusion in this column, please provide complete details at least three weeks prior to the event.

Austin: A “Farming Fundamentals Series” will be presented by the Texas AgriLife Extension Service during three consecutive Wednesdays in October. The programs will be held from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. on Oct. 12, 19 and 26 at the agency offices, located at 1600-B Smith Rd. in southeast Austin. This series will be helpful for home and small-plot producers, including those who grow to sell at farmers markets, are involved in sustainable foods efforts or are interested in community gardens and other small-yield production. Series instruction will focus on various horticultural and business aspects of growing and selling vegetable and fruit crops. All presentations will be made in person by AgriLife Extension personnel and by representatives of the Texas Department of Agriculture, the U.S Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service and other agencies. The Oct. 12 program will address plant pathology, the economics of small-acreage production, vegetable production and product marketing. The Oct. 19 program will address the Texas Environmental Quality Incentives Program, organic certification, and soils, fertilizers and composting. The Oct. 26 program will cover planning a small–scale farming operation and include an overview of fruit crops and community resources available to small-scale producers. The cost for all three programs in the series is $125, and lunch is provided during each program. All registration must be done through the Texas AgriLife Extension Conference Services, and space is limited to 25, so attendees are encouraged to register as soon as possible. To register, go to the conference services website at https://agriliferegister.tamu.edu/ and use keyword “farm” or call 979-845-2604.

Houston: Learn about native plants at the 31st NPSOT Annual Fall Symposium, Oct. 13-Oct. 16, at the Omni Houston Hotel at Westside, 13210 Katy Freeway at Eldridge Parkway, Houston. Entertaining and educational exhibits, a native plant sale, flower arranging and photography competitions, a silent auction, expert speakers from across the state and field trips to native habitats in the Houston area will highlight the symposium, “Habitat CPR: Creating, Preserving and Restoring Native Habitats in a Changing World.” Symposium 2011 kicks off Thursday, Oct. 13, with on-the-way field trips for out-of-town attendees. All symposium registrants are invited to attend the welcome reception Thursday evening. On Friday and Saturday leaders in the conservation of native plants will present. They include Fred Smeins, Ph.D., range ecology professor, Texas A&M University, the leading expert on Texas coastal prairies and marshes; John Jacob, Ph.D., professor and extension specialist, director of the Texas Coastal Watershed Program and co-author of “Texas Coastal Wetlands Guidebook,” Bill Neiman, founder and president, Native American Seed; Jaime Gonzalez, community education manager, Katy Prairie Conservancy and Mark Kramer, stewardship coordinator, Armand Bayou Nature Center. Saturday evening, the symposium will conclude with a dinner and special screening of the new film, Wildflowers | Seeds of History, produced by PBS. For a complete schedule and registration information, please visit www.npsot.org/wp/symposium2011.

Houston: The Garden Club of Houston’s 69th Annual Bulb & Plant Mart will be held from 10 a.m. until 7 p.m. Friday, October 14, and from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. Saturday, October 15, at Holly Hall Retirement Center, 2000 Holly Hall St. at Fannin (across from Reliant Stadium). On-site parking and admission are free. A Speaker Series is being offered the week before on October 8th, in the chapel of Holly Hall. Heidi Sheesly of Treesearch Farms and Chris Wiesinger of Southern Bulb Company will be speaking about what to plant in drought conditions and about Texas heirloom bulbs respectively. All purchases are tax free. Admission and parking are free.

Conroe: The Montgomery County Master Gardeners Association will be having their Fall Plant Sale on Saturday, October 15. County Horticulturist Tom LeRoy will be speaking at 8 a.m. and the sale will be from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. Bring your wagon and come early; selections will be limited. There will be a large plant clearance area, also. The plant sale will be at 9020 Airport Road, across from the Lone Star Convention Center in Conroe. For additional information, call 936-539-7824.

Farmers Branch: The fourth annual RoseDango celebrates the rose, October 15 and 16 in the Rose Gardens of Farmers Branch and the Chambersville Heritage Rose Garden in McKinney. These two undiscovered garden gems located in the Dallas Metroplex will host this two day festival. While Rosie is the official hostess, RoseDango is much more than a celebration of these gardens and the ultimate landscape plant. There are many opportunities to expand your general garden knowledge. Topics include successful rose gardening, organic gardening, butterfly gardening, companion plants, garden tools, potpourri and water conservation. As an added attraction, RoseDango is a component of Bloomin Bluegrass a two-day music festival in Farmers Branch. In Chambersville, local wineries will present their wines for tasting and enjoyment. The Rose Gardens of Farmers Branch will host the event on Saturday from noon until 3:30 pm. Registration is in the pavilion of Gussie Field Watterworth Park, 2610 Valley View. There will be activities for the whole family including a children’s zone, bluegrass music and gardening presentations. A complimentary lunch will be provided at noon. Roses will be available for purchase. For more information on the bluegrass festival music check out http://bluegrassheritage.org/FarmersBranchFestival.php. Chambersville Heritage Rose Garden will host the event on Saturday and Sunday from 9 a.m. until 6 p.m. Registration is at the gardens, 7032 CR 971, McKinney. ‘Paint Your Thumb Green’ sets the tone. Tours, rose growing seminars, live music and wine tastings will delight both the novice and experienced gardener. Roses along with a great selection of trees will be available for purchase. Complimentary lunch will be served. The event is free and open to all. For the latest information on programming www.RoseDango.com.

Victoria: Victoria County Master Gardener Association will hold its annual fall plant sale featuring thousands of plants, October 15, Saturday, at VEG Pavilion located on Bachelor Drive across from Victoria Regional Airport's old control tower. The sale will run from 8 a.m. until all plants are sold, or until 2 p.m., whichever comes first. Trees, shrubs, perennials and annuals will be offered.

Woodway: The Children's Garden Fair is taking place on October 16 from 2 p.m.-5 p.m. This is a free event sponsored by the McLennan County Master Gardeners. There will be rock painting, a scavenger hunt, worm composting, insect identification, and more! All children must be accompanied by an adult. If you have any questions, contact the Carleen Bright Arboretum at 254-399-9204 or email arboretum@woodway-texas.com. The Carleen Bright Arboretum is located at 9001 Bosque Blvd., Woodway.

San Antonio: The monthly Essentials of Gardening class sponsored by Gardening Volunteers of South Texas features "Landscaping with Cactus and Succulents," presented by Jeff Pavlat of the Austin Cactus and Succulent Society. Stay for the second session, "12 Months of Xeriscape Color" with Dr. Calvin Finch of San Antonio Water System, co-host of Milberger's Gardening South Texas on KLUP Radio. Noon-3 p.m., Monday, October 17 at San Antonio Garden Center, 3310 N. New Braunfels, San Antonio. Free and open to the public. No advance reservations are required. For more information, visit www.GardeningVolunteers.org or call GVST at 210-251-8101.

College Station: Roy Vaughan, Master Gardener, will present "Trees for the Brazos Valley" 6:30 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. October 18 at the Larry J Ringer Library, 1818 Harvey Mitchell Parkway, College Station. Trees are on the job 24 hours a day. They boost property values, shade homes – saving money and electricity. They clean the air we breathe and the water we drink. Learn about recommended varieties and the tree-soil relationship. $10 per person. Download Registration Form.

Rockport: Dr. Marsha Hendrix, Master Gardener and Director of the Fulton Mansion State Historic Site, and Beth Wilson, Master Gardener. will present "Recreating the Fulton Mansion Garden" from noon until 1 p.m., Tuesday, October 18, at the Aransas County Library, 701 E. Mimosa, Rockport. For additional information, call (361)-790-0103.

Seabrook: Anthony Camerino will present a lecture on Composting, Wednesday, October 19, at 10 a.m. at The Meeting Room at Clear Lake Park (on the lake side), 5001 NASA Parkway, Seabrook. This lecture is free and open to the public. For more information visit http://harris-tx.tamu.edu/hort/.

San Antonio: The Bexar County Master Gardeners will meet 1 p.m.-3 p.m. October 21 at the Bexar County AgriLife conference room, 3355 Cherry Ridge Dr., Suite 208, San Antonio, for "Building and Maintain Small Water features in the Garden," presented by Carlos Flannery of Aquatic Escapes.

Austin: "Central Texas Trees and Oak Wilt FAQ" will be presented Saturday, October 22, 2:30 p.m.-4 p.m. at Old Quarry Oaks Public Library, 7051 Village Center Dr., Austin. Learn all about how to do right by your trees. Learn what varieties to select for your Central Texas landscape and gain a higher level of success by choosing those that enjoy our native soils and tough climate. Learn how to care for and prune your tree for long-term health and during times of stress such as construction or drought. Master Gardener Jerry Naiser will share his expertise on all things trees! For more information, contact the Master Gardeners Help Line at 512-854-9600. This seminar is presented by the Travis County Master Gardeners, a volunteer arm of the Texas AgriLife Extension Service in Travis County. For more information, visit www.tcmastergardeners.org.

Burnet: "Hill Country Roses" with Master Gardener Sheryl Yantis. Learn how to choose, prepare the soil, plant and prune beautiful low maintenance roses in the Hill Country in a program presented free by the Green Thumb Programs of the Highland Lakes Master Gardeners in conjunction with Texas AgriLife Extension on Saturday, October 22. The program will start at 10:30 a.m. at the Herman Brown Free Library on the square in Burnet. Be sure to visit the Burnet Farmers Market before and after the program. To learn about the Green Thumb programs and/or to be reminded about attending, visit http://yantislakesidegardens.giving.officelive.com/greenthumb.aspx.

Gonzales: The Gonzales Master Gardeners will hold a fund-raising rummage sale Saturday, October 22, from 8 a.m. – 1 p.m. at 623 N. Fair Street, next to Gonzales Elementary School. The sale will benefit the Gonzales Master Gardener's community projects and horticulture education programs for school children and the general public.

Rockport: Keith Pawelek, Manger of Caesar Kleberg Wildlife Research Institute, will present "Native Plants and Invasive Plants" from 10:15 a.m. until 12:15 p.m., Saturday, October 22, at the Aransas County Library, 701 E. Mimosa, Rockport. For additional information, call (361)-790-0103.

College Station: Sandy Winokur, Ph.D., Professional olive orchard owner/olive product producer, will present "The Olive Trees: An Ancient Tree Flourishes in Texas" 7 p.m. - 8 p.m. October 25 at Brazos Center, 3232 Briarcrest Dr.. Bryan. Learn of this growing Texas industry, including information on growing olive trees, olive oil and various olive products. All gardeners are invited to this free event. The program begins at 7 p.m.; doors open at 6:45 p.m.

Rockport: Darlene Goorish, Master Gardener, will present "Winter Care of Tropicals" from noon until 1 p.m., Tuesday, November 15, at the Aransas County Library, 701 E. Mimosa, Rockport. For additional information, call (361)-790-0103.

MONTHLY MEETINGS

Houston: The Harris County Master Gardeners meet at noon the first Tuesday of each month at the Texas AgriLife Extension, 3033 Bear Creek Drive (near the intersection of Highway 6 and Patterson Road), Houston. For additional information visit http://hcmga.tamu.edu or call 281-855-5600.

Rockport: Monthly meetings of the Aransas/San Patricio Master Gardeners are held at 10 a.m. on the first Tuesday of each month at Texas AgriLife Extension Service - Aransas County Office, 611 E. Mimosa, Rockport. For additional information, e-mail aransas-tx@tamu.edu or call 361-790-0103.

Wichita Falls: The Wichita County Master Gardener Association meets at 5:30 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 600 Scott Street, Wichita Falls, on the first Tuesday of each month. For more information, visit http://www.overthegardengate.org or call 940-716-8610.

Kilgore: Northeast Texas Organic Gardeners meets at 1 p.m. on the first Wednesday of each month. For more information, call Carole Ramke at 903-986-9475.

Allen: The Allen Garden Club meets at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month, February through December, at the Allen Heritage Center, 100 E. Main St., Allen. For more information, visit www.allengardenclub.org.

Brownwood: The Brown County Master Gardeners Association meets the first Thursday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 605 Fisk Ave., Brownwood. For further information, call Mary Green Engle at 325-784-8453.

Gonzalas: Gonzales Master Gardeners Association holds their monthly meeting on the first Thursday of each month. A short program is presented. The meeting is held from noon until 1 p.m. at 1405 Conway St. (Odd Fellows Lodge). Bring a bag lunch, drinks provided. Contact AgriLife Extension Office at 830-672-8531 or e-mail gonzales@ag.tamu.edu for more information.

Austin: Austin Organic Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. on the second Monday of each month at the Zilker Botanical Gardens in Austin. For more information, visit www.main.org/aog.

Marion: The Guadalupe County (Schertz/Seguin) Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets on the second Tuesday of each month except July and August at The Library, 500 Bulldog, Marion. There is a plant exchange and meet-and-greet begins at 6:30 p.m. followed by the program at 7 p.m. Visitors are welcome. For more information or an application to join NPSOT visit www.npsot.org/GuadalupeCounty/ or contact contact guadalupecounty@npsot.org.

Longview: The Gregg County Master Gardeners Association meets the second Wednesday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 405 E. Marshall Ave., Longview. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program preceding the business meeting. For further information call Cindy Gill at 903-236-8429 or visit www.gregg-tx.tamu.edu.

Rockport: The Rockport Herb & Rose Study Group, founded in March 2003, meets the second Wednesday of each month at 10 a.m. at 619 N. Live Oak Street, Room 14, Rockport, to discuss all aspects of using and growing herbs, including historical uses and tips for successful propagation and cultivation. Sometimes they take field trips and have cooking demonstrations in different locations. For more information, contact Linda 361-729-6037, Ruth 361-729-8923 or Cindy 979-562-2153 or visit www.rockportherbs.org and http://rockportherbies.blogspot.com.

Beaumont: The Jefferson County Master Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the AgriLife Extension Office, 1225 Pearl Street, Suite 200, Beaumont. For more information, call 409-835-8461.

Brownwood: Brown County Master Gardeners Association meets the second Thursday of each month, from Noon to 1 p.m., at the Brown County AgriLife Extension Office, 605 Fisk, Brownwood. For additional information, call Freda Day 325-643-1077, or Mary Engle 325-784-8453.

Georgetown: The Williamson County Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the Georgetown Public Library, 402 W. 8th Street. Georgetown. For additional information, contract Billye Adams at 512-863-9636 or visit http://www.npsot.org/WilliamsonCounty/default.htm.

Orange: The Orange County Master Gardeners meet at the Salvation Army in Orange on the second Thursday of each month. A covered-dish dinner at 6:30 p.m. is followed by a speaker and business meeting at 7 p.m.

San Antonio: The San Antonio Herb Society meets at 7 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month at the San Antonio Garden Center, 3310 N. New Braunfels (corner of Funston & N. New Braunfels). For more information on programs, visit www.sanantonioherbs.org.

College Station: The A&M Garden Club meets on the second Friday of each month during the school year at 9:30 am at the Peace Lutheran Church, 2201 Rio Grande, College Station. Expert speakers, plant sharing, and federated club projects help members learn about gardening in the Brazos Valley, floral design, conservation, and more. For more information, visit http://www.amgardenclub.com/.

Dallas: The Rainbow Garden Club of North Texas meets the second Sunday of each month at 2 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Meetings are held at member’s homes and garden centers around the area. For more information, visit www.RainbowGardenClub.com.

Arlington: The Arlington Men's Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the third Monday of each month (except December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact Lance Jepson at LJepson@aol.com.

Cleburne: The Johnson County Master Gardeners meet at 2 p.m. on the third Monday of each month at McGregor House, 1628 W. Henderson, Cleburne, which includes a program and a meet & greet. For more information, call Diane Asberry at 817-558-3932.

Sugar Land: The Sugar Land Garden Club meets on the third Tuesday of each month, September through November and January through April at 10 a.m. at the Sugar Land Community Center, 226 Matlage Way, Sugar Land. The club hosts a different speaker each month. For more information, visit www.sugarlandgardenclub.org.

Denton: The Denton Organic Society, a group devoted to sharing information and educating the public regarding organic principles, meets the third Wednesday of each month (except July, August and December) at the Denton Senior Center, 509 N. Bell Avenue. Meetings are free and open to the public. Meetings begin at 7 p.m. and are preceded by a social at 6:30. For more information, call 940-382-8551.

Glen Rose: The Somervell County Master Gardeners meet at 10 a.m., the third Wednesday of each month at the Somervell County AgriLife Extension office, 1405 Texas Drive, Glen Rose. Visitors are welcome. For more information, call 254-897-2809 or visit www.somervellmastergardeners.org.

Granbury: The Lake Granbury Master Gardeners meet at 1 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at the Hood County Annex 1, 1410 West Pearl Street, Granbury. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program each month preceding the business meeting. For information on topics call 817-579-3280 or visit http://www.hoodcountymastergardeners.org/.

Seabrook: The Harris County Precinct 2 Master Gardeners hold an educational program at 10 a.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at The Meeting Room at Clear Lake Park (on the Lakeside), 5001 NASA Road 1, Seabrook. The programs are free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu.

Houston: The Native Plant Society of Texas — Houston (NPSOT-H) meets at 7 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except for October (4th Thursday) and December (2nd Thursday). Location varies. For locations, for more information on programs, and for information about native plants for Houston, visit http://www.npsot.org/Houston.

Rosenberg: The Fort Bend Master Gardeners meet at 7:00 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except December at the Bud O’Shieles Community Center located at 1330 Band Road, Rosenberg. For more information, call 281-341-7068 or visit www.fbmg.com.

Seguin: The Guadalupe County Master Gardeners meets at 7 p.m. the third Thursday of each month, except December, at the Texas AgriLife Extension Bldg. at 210 E. Live Oak, Seguin. An educational program precedes the business meeting. The public is invited to attend. For topic or other information, call 830-379-1972 or visit www.guadalupecountymastergardeners.org.

Atlanta: The Caddo Wildflower Chapter of Native Plants Society meets the fourth Tuesday of each month at the Horne Enterprise building in Atlanta at 7 p.m. Visitors are welcome. For additional information, contact Kay Lowery at frostkay268@aol.com.

Brackenridge Park: The Native Plant Society San Antonio Chapter meets every fourth Tuesday of each month at 7:00 p.m. in the Lions Field Adult and Senior Center, 2809 Broadway at E. Mulberry, Brackenridge Park, except August and December. Social and seed/plant exchange at 6:30 p.m. Free and open to the public. For more information, contact Bea at 210-999-7292 or visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio.

Edna: The Jackson County Master Gardeners present their "Come Grown With Us" seminars on the fourth Tuesday of each month, January through October, beginning at 7 p.m. at 411 N. Wells, Edna. The seminars are free, open to the public and offer 2 CEU hours to Master Gardeners or others requiring them. For additional information, contact the Jackson County Extension Office at 361-782-3312.

Fort Worth: The Organic Garden Club of Forth Worth meets at 7 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday of each month except July and December at the Fort Worth Botanic Gardens main building. Refreshments are served. For more information, call 817-263-9322 or visit www.ogcfw.webs.com.

San Antonio: The Native Plant Society of Texas San Antonio Chapter meets the fourth Tuesday of the month, except August and December, at the Lions Field Adult & Senior Center, 2809 Broadway, San Antonio. Social and plant/seed exchange at 6:30 p.m., program at 7:00 p.m. For more information, visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio or call Bea at 210-999-7292.

Leander: The Leander Garden Club meets on the fourth Thursday of each month (except July and August) at 10:30 a.m. at the Leander Presbyterian Church, 101 N. West Drive, Leander, unless there is a field trip or an event at a member's home. Following a short business meeting, there is usually a program, followed by a shared pot-luck luncheon. To confirm the meeting place and time, please call Cathy Clark-Ramsey at 512-963-4698 or email texascatalina@yahoo.com.

Dallas: The Dallas Organic Garden Club meets at 2:30 p.m. on the fourth Sunday of each month at the North Haven Gardens, 7700 Northaven Rd., Dallas. For more information, call 214-824-2448 or visit www.dogc.org.

Arlington: The Arlington Organic Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the last Thursday of each month (except November and December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact David at 817) 483-7746.


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In Greg's Garden:
A Pineywoods Perspective on Gardening, Nature and Family

An intimate and personal exploration of the life of one of Texas’s most beloved gardeners, In Greg’s Garden: A Pineywoods Perspective on Gardening, Nature and Family gathers in a single volume the first nine years of Greg Grant’s columns from Texas Gardener magazine.

Revised and updated from their original publication, these 54 essays reveal the heart and soul of a seventh generation native Texan who has devoted his entire life to gardening, nature and family. With degrees in floriculture and horticulture from Texas A&M University and extensive hands-on experience as a horticulturist with the Texas Agricultural Extension Service, Stephen F. Austin State University, Mercer Arboretum and San Antonio Botanical Gardens, Grant has successfully introduced dozens of plants to the Texas nursery industry, all while maintaining long-held family property and renovating the homes of his ancestors in Arcadia, Texas.

In Greg’s Garden: A Pineywoods Perspective on Gardening, Nature and Family is a must-read for every Texas gardener.

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Wish you'd saved them?

Are you missing an important issue of Texas Gardener? Or, perhaps, just tired of thumbing through stacks of back issues looking for the tips and techniques you need to make your garden grow? These new CDs provide easy access to all six issues of
volume 20 (November/December 2000 through September/October 2001),
volume 21
(November/December 2001 through September/October 2002),
volume 22
(November/December 2002 through September/October 2003),
volume 23
(November/December 2003 through September/October 2004),
volume 24 (November/December 2004 through September/October 2005),
volume 25 (November/December 2005 through September/October 2006),
volume 26 (November/December 2006 through September/October 2007),
volume 27 (November/December 2007 through September/October 2008),
volume 28 (November/December 2008 through September/October 2009),
volume 29 (November/December 2009 through September/October 2010), and
volume 30 (November/December 2010 through September/October 2011)*.

$16.99 per CD includes tax and shipping

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(Discover, MasterCard and Visa accepted.)

*Other volumes will be available soon.


Fiber row cover valuable year-round

Grow-Web encourages plant growth and development, and also provides protection from insects, birds, diseases and frosts. It is also air and water permeable and allows for ventilation. Grow-Web provides excellent protection to seedlings when applied directly to the seedbed.

$31.88 per 12.3’ x 32.8’ roll (includes shipping!)

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Become a fan of Texas Gardener magazine on Facebook. See what we're up to at http://www.facebook.com/pages/Texas-Gardener-Magazine/301356291835?ref=nf.


Texas Gardener’s Seeds is published weekly. © Suntex Communications, Inc. 2011. All rights reserved. You may forward this publication to your friends and colleagues if it is sent in its entirety. No individual part of this newsletter may be reproduced in any manner without prior written permission from the publisher.

Missed an issue? Back issues of Texas Gardener’s Seeds are available at www.texasgardener.com/newsletters.

Publisher: Chris S. Corby ● Editor: Michael Bracken

Texas Gardener’s Seeds, P.O. Box 9005, Waco, Texas 76714 ● www.TexasGardener.com