October 19, 2011

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Nearly 1.5 million trees expected to die after wildfire ravages Bastrop County

By Holly Huffman
Communications Specialist
Texas Forest Service

Once known for its vast fields of stately pines, Bastrop County could lose 1.5 million trees as a result of deadly wildfire that ravaged the community last month.

The Bastrop County Complex — a 34,000-acre inferno deemed the most destructive wildfire in state history — ignited over Labor Day weekend, forcing thousands of evacuations, destroying more than 1,500 homes and killing two people.

The natural landscape also took a significant hit. More than 16,200 acres of pine and mixed-pine deciduous forests full of large, mature trees were charred during the fire, according to a damage assessment recently completed by Texas Forest Service.

“We hope this assessment will give Bastrop a rough idea of what they’re dealing with so they can plan and move forward with their recovery,” said Burl Carraway, Sustainable Forestry Department Head at Texas Forest Service. “The fire area includes almost half of the contiguous Lost Pines ecosystem.”

Texas Forest Service conducted the damage assessment to better determine the total volume of damaged and destroyed timber that would need to be removed — and possibly utilized.

Before the massive wildfire, the forests in the fire perimeter contained more than 31 million cubic feet of live trees. After the fire, just seven million cubic feet — or about 22 percent of total volume — were considered likely to survive, according to the timber damage assessment.

The assessment indicates that 12 million cubic feet of trees — or about 38 percent of the total volume — were killed by the fire. Another 13 million cubic feet — or about 40 percent of total volume — were considered to be still alive, but likely to die soon.

When you combine the trees that are dead and likely to die, the total volume of trees lost surpasses 24 million cubic feet, which is equal to about 850,000 green tons of timber.

According to East Texas timber markets, those trees would have been worth $14 million as they stood in the forest — a figure also known as stumpage value.


Program preserves American Southern seeds, history

University of North Texas

Whether to replenish devastated crops or to grow plants from the past, farmers and gardeners often look for heirloom seeds, old, non-hybrid varieties of plants that have become difficult to find over time.

The Southern Seed Legacy program at the University of North Texas works to collect and conserve Southern heirloom seeds and their histories, with a particular focus on seeds threatened by genetic erosion or extinction. The Southern Seed Legacy serves as a seed reserve for plant varieties in danger of becoming extinct, and as a memory bank documenting the cultural history of Southern heirloom plants.

The Southern Seed Legacy began in 1996 at the University of Georgia. In the spring of 2011, the program was moved to UNT, and is now under the direction of UNT Anthropology Professor James Veteto. The program, which houses more than 700 varieties of seeds, is housed in the Laboratory of Environmental Anthropology in UNT’s Life Sciences Complex.

“The cultural and biological heritage of southern crop varieties has enriched life in the South for the past several thousand years,” Veteto said. ”Whereas most Southerners used to work on farms and grow their own food, today less than 1 percent of the population is still employed in farming. Presently, the conservation of old-time seed varieties mostly takes place in home gardens, and is practiced by older generations. The Southern Seed Legacy aims to conserve and promote these time-honored and cherished heirloom varieties and cultural memories and encourage a new generation of Southern farmers and gardeners to take an interest in growing local foods. This is becoming increasingly important in the face of economic hard times and uncertain climate change.”

In the future, Veteto hopes to develop a greenspace area on campus featuring a garden of plants from the Southern Seed Legacy, and to host a seed swap in spring 2012. He also plans to work toward recruiting more growers and seed collectors into the Southern Seed Legacy’s membership network.


South Central Texas residents can get heaps of horticulture help from AgriLife Extension

Texas AgriLife Extension Service

Ever wonder who to call for advice on the care and maintenance of your lawn, trees, shrubs, and ornamental and vegetable plants? The Texas AgriLife Extension Service has professionals, publications and other educational materials to inform South Central Texas residents on a host of horticultural issues, said an agency expert in San Antonio.

“We want to remind South Central Texas residents that in addition to calling a nursery or landscaping professional, they can get objective, relevant, research-based advice and information from AgriLife Extension, including online information,” said David Rodriguez, AgriLife Extension agent for horticulture, Bexar County.

Rodriguez noted that some AgriLife Extension offices in metropolitan areas have Master Gardener “hotlines” staffed by members of AgriLife Extension’s volunteer Master Gardener program.

“These people are knowledgeable on a wide array of topics relating to gardening and general horticulture, and someone is almost always available to answer hotline calls during regular AgriLife Extension office hours.”

Rodriguez said in 2010 Bexar County Master Gardener hotline volunteers responded to 2,599 phone calls and 991 emails. The phone number for the hotline in Bexar County is 210-467-6575, and the email address to send an inquiry is info@bexarcountymastergardeners.org.

“There are also call-in and live-chat format opportunities for people to contact me to ask a horticulture-related question,” Rodriguez said. “We try to give area residents different options that are compatible with their schedule, lifestyle and comfort level with technology.”

Rodriguez said he provides advice and takes call-ins from 7 to 10 a.m. each Saturday during the weekly Home and Garden show on WOAI Radio hosted by Bill Rohde and broadcast throughout South Central Texas. The show’s page at http://radio.woai.com/pages/homeandgardenshow.html also contains archived podcasts of previous broadcasts and a gardening calendar with seasonal advice and information. The call-in number for the show is 210-737-1200. He also responds to live chat requests on http://www.mysa.com from 11 a.m. to noon the last Tuesday of each month.

“Of course, AgriLife Extension also conducts Master Gardener classes and agency personnel and Master Gardener volunteers participate in numerous community educational programs throughout the year,” he said. “We provide information and offer advice that emphasizes environmental responsibility, such as water conservation, the use of low-maintenance Texas SuperStar plants, proper use of herbicides and pesticides, and the benefits of using mulch and compost.”

Agency data shows that in 2010 Rodriguez and Bexar County Master Gardener volunteers made more than 250 community presentations reaching 28,025 Bexar County residents. They provided instruction and gave hands-on demonstrations in small community venues and at larger venues, such as the San Antonio Livestock Show and Rodeo and Festival of Flowers. In cooperation with the San Antonio Botanical Garden, they have introduced hundreds of area youth to horticulture and gardening through the Children’s Vegetable Garden Program at the botanical garden and Terrarium-Ecosystem workshops in schools.

“Through our Youth Gardening Program, we serve more than 200 schools, the majority of which are located in low-income areas of Bexar County, introducing elementary and middle school children to gardening and horticulture,” Rodriguez said. “This helps give them a respect for nature and also provides them with another interesting outdoor school activity.”

He noted that, in addition to in-person contact for addressing gardening and horticultural issues, residents can access information online at Aggie Horticulture, http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu. This website contains a variety of fact sheets, guides and databases, as well as an extensive archive of horticulture-related questions and answers. He added that the AgriLife Extension Bookstore website at https://agrilifebookstore.org is another source for gardening and horticultural information.

“The Bookstore has materials on everything from planting a home vegetable garden to turf grass selection, landscaping and landscape maintenance to xeriscaping, building a butterfly garden or constructing a home rainwater harvesting system,” Rodriguez said. “You can download a lot of free information, and many of the publications are offered in Spanish as well as English.”

For more information, contact Rodriguez at 210-467-6575 or dhrodriguez@ag.tamu.edu.


Gardening tips

Too many leaves in your backyard pond will choke out the oxygen and pond critters will die. Before those fall leaves start dropping, try covering the pond with bird netting to catch the leaves. Then remove them before they rot.

Have a favorite gardening tip you’d like to share? Texas Gardener’s Seeds is seeking brief gardening tips from Texas gardeners to use in future issues. If we publish your tip in Seeds, we will send you a free Texas Gardener 2011 Planning Guide & Calendar. Please send your tips of 50 words or less to the editor at: Gardening Tips.


Did you know...

Ornamental fish make a nice addition to backyard ponds. Just be sure not to use too many because they will eat tadpoles and larvae. Fish will also attract other wildlife, such as herons and raccoons, unless you cover the pond with netting.


Upcoming garden events.

If you would like your organization’s events included in "Upcoming Garden Events" or would like to make a change to a listed event, please contact us at Garden Events. To ensure inclusion in this column, please provide complete details at least three weeks prior to the event.

Huntsville: Carol Cullar, from Rio Bravo Nature Center, an authority on all things Monarch, will lead a Monarch Migration Workshop at 6:30 p.m., Friday, October 21, at the Veterans Storm Shelter 455 SH 75 N, Huntsville. $12/adults, children under 14 free. The following day, Saturday, October 22, the Walker County Master Gardeners will host their Annual Fall Plant Sale/ 2nd Annual Butterfly Festival to celebrate butterflies with seminars, garden tours, face painting, children activities and a Monarch tag and release event at 2:00 p.m. The plant sale will include annuals, bulbs, natives, fall veggies, herbs and butterfly merchandise. Zachary Stayton, Master Gardener and Horticulturalist at the Houston Museum of Natural Science, will talk about "Identifying Butterfly Nectar Plants" at 10:00 a.m. in the AgriLife Building. Also available will be offering a BBQ lunch for $5. Located at 102 Tam Road (Hwy 75 north, 2 miles north of Pilot Truck Stop) Huntsville, TX. Call 936-435-2426 for additional information.

San Antonio: The Bexar County Master Gardeners will meet 1 p.m.-3 p.m. October 21 at the Bexar County AgriLife conference room, 3355 Cherry Ridge Dr., Suite 208, San Antonio, for "Building and Maintain Small Water features in the Garden," presented by Carlos Flannery of Aquatic Escapes.

Austin: "Central Texas Trees and Oak Wilt FAQ" will be presented Saturday, October 22, 2:30 p.m.-4 p.m. at Old Quarry Oaks Public Library, 7051 Village Center Dr., Austin. Learn all about how to do right by your trees. Learn what varieties to select for your Central Texas landscape and gain a higher level of success by choosing those that enjoy our native soils and tough climate. Learn how to care for and prune your tree for long-term health and during times of stress such as construction or drought. Master Gardener Jerry Naiser will share his expertise on all things trees! For more information, contact the Master Gardeners Help Line at 512-854-9600. This seminar is presented by the Travis County Master Gardeners, a volunteer arm of the Texas AgriLife Extension Service in Travis County. For more information, visit www.tcmastergardeners.org.

Burnet: "Hill Country Roses" with Master Gardener Sheryl Yantis. Learn how to choose, prepare the soil, plant and prune beautiful low maintenance roses in the Hill Country in a program presented free by the Green Thumb Programs of the Highland Lakes Master Gardeners in conjunction with Texas AgriLife Extension on Saturday, October 22. The program will start at 10:30 a.m. at the Herman Brown Free Library on the square in Burnet. Be sure to visit the Burnet Farmers Market before and after the program. To learn about the Green Thumb programs and/or to be reminded about attending, visit http://yantislakesidegardens.giving.officelive.com/greenthumb.aspx.

Gonzales: The Gonzales Master Gardeners will hold a fund-raising rummage sale Saturday, October 22, from 8 a.m. – 1 p.m. at 623 N. Fair Street, next to Gonzales Elementary School. The sale will benefit the Gonzales Master Gardener's community projects and horticulture education programs for school children and the general public.

Odessa: “Managing Your Landscape with Less Water” will be presented at 9 a.m., Saturday, October 22, in the Auditorium at Odessa Regional Medical Center, 520 E. Sixth, Odessa. The half-day seminar will include sessions about “Water Supply — Preparing for the Future,” “Trees — Helping Them Survive The Drought,” “Selecting Native & Drought Tolerant Plants for Fall 2011,” “Irrigation Systems — Audits, Conversions, & Maintenance,” and “Landscape Management — Using Mulch To Conserve Water.” For additional information, contact wenmarlowe@sbcglobal.net.

Rockport: Keith Pawelek, Manger of Caesar Kleberg Wildlife Research Institute, will present "Native Plants and Invasive Plants" from 10:15 a.m. until 12:15 p.m., Saturday, October 22, at the Aransas County Library, 701 E. Mimosa, Rockport. For additional information, call (361)-790-0103.

College Station: Sandy Winokur, Ph.D., Professional olive orchard owner/olive product producer, will present "The Olive Trees: An Ancient Tree Flourishes in Texas" 7 p.m. - 8 p.m. October 25 at Brazos Center, 3232 Briarcrest Dr.. Bryan. Learn of this growing Texas industry, including information on growing olive trees, olive oil and various olive products. All gardeners are invited to this free event. The program begins at 7 p.m.; doors open at 6:45 p.m.

Cleburne: Each year Texas Master Gardeners have an opportunity to be involved in "Specialist Training".  This year the Johnson County Master Gardeners will host the 2011 Earth-Kind Specialist Training. For the first time, the training will include Earth-Kind aspects of landscape design, rainwater harvesting, turf management, perennials, plant pathology, integrated pest management, and, of course, ROSES!  Speakers will be: Dr. Doug Welsh, Dr. Steve George, Dr. Jim McAfee, Dr. Greg Church, Steve Chaney, Mark Chamblee, and Pam Smith. Registration with payment of $175.00 is due by October 1, 2011. Date: October 26-28. Cleburne is 30 miles south of Ft. Worth. For more information and registration go resources/Earth-Kind Specialist Training: www.jcmga.org or call 817-556-6370.

Ft. Worth: The State of Texas African Violent Convention, Show and Sale will be held October 28-29 at Crowne Plaza Fort Worth South, 100 Alta Mesa East Blvd., Fort Worth. This year's theme is "Lost in Ft, Worth: A Violet Traveler's Guide to Cowtown." Dr, Bill Price will speak about "African Violet Trailers and Other Gesneriads." For additional information, call 940-565-0363.

Midland: “Managing Your Landscape with Less Water” will be presented at 9 a.m., Saturday, October 29, at the Sibley Nature Center, 1307 E. Wadley Avenue, Midland. The half-day seminar will include sessions about “Water Supply — Preparing for the Future,” “Trees — Helping Them Survive The Drought,” “Selecting Native & Drought Tolerant Plants for Fall 2011,” “Irrigation Systems — Audits, Conversions, & Maintenance,” and “Landscape Management — Using Mulch To Conserve Water.” For additional information, contact wenmarlowe@sbcglobal.net.

Kemah: Jennifer Rubens, Young Living will present "Essential Oils" at 9:30 a.m., November 2, at the monthly meeting of the Kemah-Bay Area Garden Club, held at the Jimmie Walker Community Center, 800 Harris Ave and Highway 146, Kemah. What do rose, pine, peppermint, oregano, sage, thyme, lemongrass, juniper, geranium, dill, lavender, and chamomile have in common? They all contain powerful oils with medical properties. Come find out about how various shrubs, flowers, trees, roots, bushes and seeds work, how to safely use these essential oils, how to be sure an oil is therapeutic grade, and medical and fragrant uses of some of these single oils. It may transform the way you see your garden. Light refreshments will be served and the public is invited. Refreshments will be served and the public is invited. For additional information, call Anniece Larkins, president, at 281-842-9008.

Rockport: Darlene Goorish, Master Gardener, will present "Winter Care of Tropicals" from noon until 1 p.m., Tuesday, November 15, at the Aransas County Library, 701 E. Mimosa, Rockport. For additional information, call (361)-790-0103.

MONTHLY MEETINGS

Houston: The Harris County Master Gardeners meet at noon the first Tuesday of each month at the Texas AgriLife Extension, 3033 Bear Creek Drive (near the intersection of Highway 6 and Patterson Road), Houston. For additional information visit http://hcmga.tamu.edu or call 281-855-5600.

Rockport: Monthly meetings of the Aransas/San Patricio Master Gardeners are held at 10 a.m. on the first Tuesday of each month at Texas AgriLife Extension Service - Aransas County Office, 611 E. Mimosa, Rockport. For additional information, e-mail aransas-tx@tamu.edu or call 361-790-0103.

Wichita Falls: The Wichita County Master Gardener Association meets at 5:30 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 600 Scott Street, Wichita Falls, on the first Tuesday of each month. For more information, visit http://www.overthegardengate.org or call 940-716-8610.

Kilgore: Northeast Texas Organic Gardeners meets at 1 p.m. on the first Wednesday of each month. For more information, call Carole Ramke at 903-986-9475.

Allen: The Allen Garden Club meets at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month, February through December, at the Allen Heritage Center, 100 E. Main St., Allen. For more information, visit www.allengardenclub.org.

Brownwood: The Brown County Master Gardeners Association meets the first Thursday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 605 Fisk Ave., Brownwood. For further information, call Mary Green Engle at 325-784-8453.

Gonzalas: Gonzales Master Gardeners Association holds their monthly meeting on the first Thursday of each month. A short program is presented. The meeting is held from noon until 1 p.m. at 1405 Conway St. (Odd Fellows Lodge). Bring a bag lunch, drinks provided. Contact AgriLife Extension Office at 830-672-8531 or e-mail gonzales@ag.tamu.edu for more information.

Austin: Austin Organic Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. on the second Monday of each month at the Zilker Botanical Gardens in Austin. For more information, visit www.main.org/aog.

Marion: The Guadalupe County (Schertz/Seguin) Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets on the second Tuesday of each month except July and August at The Library, 500 Bulldog, Marion. There is a plant exchange and meet-and-greet begins at 6:30 p.m. followed by the program at 7 p.m. Visitors are welcome. For more information or an application to join NPSOT visit www.npsot.org/GuadalupeCounty/ or contact contact guadalupecounty@npsot.org.

Longview: The Gregg County Master Gardeners Association meets the second Wednesday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 405 E. Marshall Ave., Longview. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program preceding the business meeting. For further information call Cindy Gill at 903-236-8429 or visit www.gregg-tx.tamu.edu.

Rockport: The Rockport Herb & Rose Study Group, founded in March 2003, meets the second Wednesday of each month at 10 a.m. at 619 N. Live Oak Street, Room 14, Rockport, to discuss all aspects of using and growing herbs, including historical uses and tips for successful propagation and cultivation. Sometimes they take field trips and have cooking demonstrations in different locations. For more information, contact Linda 361-729-6037, Ruth 361-729-8923 or Cindy 979-562-2153 or visit www.rockportherbs.org and http://rockportherbies.blogspot.com.

Beaumont: The Jefferson County Master Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the AgriLife Extension Office, 1225 Pearl Street, Suite 200, Beaumont. For more information, call 409-835-8461.

Brownwood: Brown County Master Gardeners Association meets the second Thursday of each month, from Noon to 1 p.m., at the Brown County AgriLife Extension Office, 605 Fisk, Brownwood. For additional information, call Freda Day 325-643-1077, or Mary Engle 325-784-8453.

Georgetown: The Williamson County Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the Georgetown Public Library, 402 W. 8th Street. Georgetown. For additional information, contract Billye Adams at 512-863-9636 or visit http://www.npsot.org/WilliamsonCounty/default.htm.

Orange: The Orange County Master Gardeners meet at the Salvation Army in Orange on the second Thursday of each month. A covered-dish dinner at 6:30 p.m. is followed by a speaker and business meeting at 7 p.m.

San Antonio: The San Antonio Herb Society meets at 7 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month at the San Antonio Garden Center, 3310 N. New Braunfels (corner of Funston & N. New Braunfels). For more information on programs, visit www.sanantonioherbs.org.

College Station: The A&M Garden Club meets on the second Friday of each month during the school year at 9:30 am at the Peace Lutheran Church, 2201 Rio Grande, College Station. Expert speakers, plant sharing, and federated club projects help members learn about gardening in the Brazos Valley, floral design, conservation, and more. For more information, visit http://www.amgardenclub.com/.

Dallas: The Rainbow Garden Club of North Texas meets the second Sunday of each month at 2 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Meetings are held at member’s homes and garden centers around the area. For more information, visit www.RainbowGardenClub.com.

Arlington: The Arlington Men's Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the third Monday of each month (except December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact Lance Jepson at LJepson@aol.com.

Cleburne: The Johnson County Master Gardeners meet at 2 p.m. on the third Monday of each month at McGregor House, 1628 W. Henderson, Cleburne, which includes a program and a meet & greet. For more information, call Diane Asberry at 817-558-3932.

Sugar Land: The Sugar Land Garden Club meets on the third Tuesday of each month, September through November and January through April at 10 a.m. at the Sugar Land Community Center, 226 Matlage Way, Sugar Land. The club hosts a different speaker each month. For more information, visit www.sugarlandgardenclub.org.

Denton: The Denton Organic Society, a group devoted to sharing information and educating the public regarding organic principles, meets the third Wednesday of each month (except July, August and December) at the Denton Senior Center, 509 N. Bell Avenue. Meetings are free and open to the public. Meetings begin at 7 p.m. and are preceded by a social at 6:30. For more information, call 940-382-8551.

Glen Rose: The Somervell County Master Gardeners meet at 10 a.m., the third Wednesday of each month at the Somervell County AgriLife Extension office, 1405 Texas Drive, Glen Rose. Visitors are welcome. For more information, call 254-897-2809 or visit www.somervellmastergardeners.org.

Granbury: The Lake Granbury Master Gardeners meet at 1 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at the Hood County Annex 1, 1410 West Pearl Street, Granbury. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program each month preceding the business meeting. For information on topics call 817-579-3280 or visit http://www.hoodcountymastergardeners.org/.

Seabrook: The Harris County Precinct 2 Master Gardeners hold an educational program at 10 a.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at The Meeting Room at Clear Lake Park (on the Lakeside), 5001 NASA Road 1, Seabrook. The programs are free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu.

Houston: The Native Plant Society of Texas — Houston (NPSOT-H) meets at 7 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except for October (4th Thursday) and December (2nd Thursday). Location varies. For locations, for more information on programs, and for information about native plants for Houston, visit http://www.npsot.org/Houston.

Rosenberg: The Fort Bend Master Gardeners meet at 7:00 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except December at the Bud O’Shieles Community Center located at 1330 Band Road, Rosenberg. For more information, call 281-341-7068 or visit www.fbmg.com.

Seguin: The Guadalupe County Master Gardeners meets at 7 p.m. the third Thursday of each month, except December, at the Texas AgriLife Extension Bldg. at 210 E. Live Oak, Seguin. An educational program precedes the business meeting. The public is invited to attend. For topic or other information, call 830-379-1972 or visit www.guadalupecountymastergardeners.org.

Atlanta: The Caddo Wildflower Chapter of Native Plants Society meets the fourth Tuesday of each month at the Horne Enterprise building in Atlanta at 7 p.m. Visitors are welcome. For additional information, contact Kay Lowery at frostkay268@aol.com.

Brackenridge Park: The Native Plant Society San Antonio Chapter meets every fourth Tuesday of each month at 7:00 p.m. in the Lions Field Adult and Senior Center, 2809 Broadway at E. Mulberry, Brackenridge Park, except August and December. Social and seed/plant exchange at 6:30 p.m. Free and open to the public. For more information, contact Bea at 210-999-7292 or visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio.

Edna: The Jackson County Master Gardeners present their "Come Grown With Us" seminars on the fourth Tuesday of each month, January through October, beginning at 7 p.m. at 411 N. Wells, Edna. The seminars are free, open to the public and offer 2 CEU hours to Master Gardeners or others requiring them. For additional information, contact the Jackson County Extension Office at 361-782-3312.

Fort Worth: The Organic Garden Club of Forth Worth meets at 7 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday of each month except July and December at the Fort Worth Botanic Gardens main building. Refreshments are served. For more information, call 817-263-9322 or visit www.ogcfw.webs.com.

San Antonio: The Native Plant Society of Texas San Antonio Chapter meets the fourth Tuesday of the month, except August and December, at the Lions Field Adult & Senior Center, 2809 Broadway, San Antonio. Social and plant/seed exchange at 6:30 p.m., program at 7:00 p.m. For more information, visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio or call Bea at 210-999-7292.

Leander: The Leander Garden Club meets on the fourth Thursday of each month (except July and August) at 10:30 a.m. at the Leander Presbyterian Church, 101 N. West Drive, Leander, unless there is a field trip or an event at a member's home. Following a short business meeting, there is usually a program, followed by a shared pot-luck luncheon. To confirm the meeting place and time, please call Cathy Clark-Ramsey at 512-963-4698 or email texascatalina@yahoo.com.

Dallas: The Dallas Organic Garden Club meets at 2:30 p.m. on the fourth Sunday of each month at the North Haven Gardens, 7700 Northaven Rd., Dallas. For more information, call 214-824-2448 or visit www.dogc.org.

Arlington: The Arlington Organic Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the last Thursday of each month (except November and December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact David at 817) 483-7746.


Sale! A book so good, even the insects like it

That’s right. We have a small quantity of The Vegetable Book that have been nibbled on by silverfish. The result is very minor cosmetic damage. We can’t sell them as new books at full price so we are forced to drastically reduce the price to $21.21 (includes tax and shipping). That is a steep discount off the regular price! This should appeal to all the tightwads out there as well as those who would like to have a second, not-so-perfect copy of Dr. Cotner’s timeless classic to carry with them to the garden as a working copy. Hurry while supplies last!

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The Texas Tomato Lover's Handbook

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In Greg's Garden:
A Pineywoods Perspective on Gardening, Nature and Family

An intimate and personal exploration of the life of one of Texas’s most beloved gardeners, In Greg’s Garden: A Pineywoods Perspective on Gardening, Nature and Family gathers in a single volume the first nine years of Greg Grant’s columns from Texas Gardener magazine.

Revised and updated from their original publication, these 54 essays reveal the heart and soul of a seventh generation native Texan who has devoted his entire life to gardening, nature and family. With degrees in floriculture and horticulture from Texas A&M University and extensive hands-on experience as a horticulturist with the Texas Agricultural Extension Service, Stephen F. Austin State University, Mercer Arboretum and San Antonio Botanical Gardens, Grant has successfully introduced dozens of plants to the Texas nursery industry, all while maintaining long-held family property and renovating the homes of his ancestors in Arcadia, Texas.

In Greg’s Garden: A Pineywoods Perspective on Gardening, Nature and Family is a must-read for every Texas gardener.

Available only for Kindle. Order directly from Amazon by clicking here.


Wish you'd saved them?

Are you missing an important issue of Texas Gardener? Or, perhaps, just tired of thumbing through stacks of back issues looking for the tips and techniques you need to make your garden grow? These new CDs provide easy access to all six issues of
volume 20 (November/December 2000 through September/October 2001),
volume 21
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volume 22
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volume 23
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volume 24 (November/December 2004 through September/October 2005),
volume 25 (November/December 2005 through September/October 2006),
volume 26 (November/December 2006 through September/October 2007),
volume 27 (November/December 2007 through September/October 2008),
volume 28 (November/December 2008 through September/October 2009),
volume 29 (November/December 2009 through September/October 2010), and
volume 30 (November/December 2010 through September/October 2011)*.

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Texas Gardener’s Seeds is published weekly. © Suntex Communications, Inc. 2011. All rights reserved. You may forward this publication to your friends and colleagues if it is sent in its entirety. No individual part of this newsletter may be reproduced in any manner without prior written permission from the publisher.

Missed an issue? Back issues of Texas Gardener’s Seeds are available at www.texasgardener.com/newsletters.

Publisher: Chris S. Corby ● Editor: Michael Bracken

Texas Gardener’s Seeds, P.O. Box 9005, Waco, Texas 76714 ● www.TexasGardener.com