November 2, 2011

Welcome to Texas Gardener’s Seeds, the weekly newsletter for Texas gardeners. Please do not reply to this e-mail because the sending address is not monitored. See the bottom of this newsletter for information on how to subscribe, unsubscribe, or contact the editor.


The garden reader:
Recent gardening books for children

By William Scheick
Book Reviewer

Edith Hope Fine and Angela Demos Halpin. Water, Weed, and Wait. Tricycle Press, 2010. 32 pp. $15.99.

Susan Grigsby. In the Garden with Dr. Carver. Albert Whitman & Co., 2010. 32 pp. $16.99.

Charlotte Middleton. Nibbles: A Green Tale. Marshall Cavendish, 2010. 26 pp. $17.99.

Since 2005, the National Children and Youth Gardening Symposium associated with the American Horticultural Society has given annual awards for new books designed to stir children’s appreciation of nature, especially through gardening.

With the gift-giving season around the corner, the titles celebrated this year might be of interest to gardeners with four- to eight-year-olds on their list. While the joys of gardening are featured in these books, each publication also offers accurate information, fosters an appreciation of print-books as beautiful objects and rewards the experience of reading as a pleasure in itself.

Doing everything we can to instill a love of reading at the earliest stages of childhood might be particularly apt now that our time is riddled by countless electronic distractions resulting in the attrition of outward attention and inner serenity.

Water, Weed, and Wait is set in an elementary school, where a class converts a patch of unattractive playground into a garden. They get unexpected help from a neighbor, whose crabby disposition grows sunnier as the school garden flourishes.

This picture book is more rally-cheer than how-to guide, but its uplifting phrasing and packed, colorful illustrations should appeal to youngsters.

In the Garden with Dr. Carver is also set in an elementary school, but a little more than a century ago. The famous school visitor is Dr. George Washington Carver, who introduces his skeptical and somewhat unruly minions to the world of plants.

This book is rich in historical and horticultural information accompanied by outstanding watercolor paintings. Young readers might easily identify with Sally, the narrator recalling this momentous visit as well as her classmates’ participation in planting a kitchen garden and their first taste of Dr. Carver’s sweet potato bread and peanut-chicken.

An insatiable taste for dandelions leads an enterprising guinea pig to become a conservationist in Nibbles: A Green Tale. When he and his fellows have eaten dandelions to near extinction, he secretly preserves the last of these plants.

At a library Nibbles carefully studies how to cultivate dandelions. When his plant successfully matures, he blows its air-borne seeds into the wind to replenish the plant-delicacy that had become so scarce in his neighborhood.

Young readers will likely enjoy the colorful images of this book, and they should also find themselves identifying with cute Nibbles, especially if they have ever blown the billowy head of a dandelion.


Drought tips from Texas A&M AgriLife scientists

ScottsMiracle-Gro

The driest year in Texas since the early 20th century is upon us. All the wilting plants, brown grass and thirsty gardens are a sight for sore eyes. Thankfully, the scientists at Texas A&M AgriLife have more great advice for helping reduce water use during this dry spout. Follow these tips to make your family a conservation machine!

When watering:

  • Be sure the irrigation system is in good, working order. Find any leaks and broken heads.
  • Turn off automatic sprinkler settings. Irrigate based on plant need. Watch for plants showing water stress symptoms, such as wilting or yellowing.
  • When watering is needed, do not do so during heat of the day, but rather in early morning.
  • Watch landscape watering-do not water sidewalks, driveways or streets.
  • Use low volume drip or trickle irrigation for garden and bedding plants.

In the garden and lawn:

  • Mulch shrubs and other plants to keep moisture in the soil longer. This also controls weeds that compete with garden plants for water.
  • Water grass less frequently, but heavier, to encourage deeper roots, which better withstand dry weather. A deeply watered lawn should be able to go five to eight days between waterings.
  • To irrigate trees and large shrubs in the lawn, water at their driplines with a slow-running hose or hose-end sprinkler. The dripline is at the tips of the branches and straight down to the ground. This is where the feeding root system of a tree or shrub is located.
  • Raise mower height slightly in hot, dry weather. Mow frequently to avoid cutting more than one third of the leaf blade.
  • Rainwater harvesting systems can provide supplemental water for landscapes and pets.
  • Do not use the hose to clean off sidewalks or driveways-sweep them clean.
  • Do not put debris, yard clippings or leaves down storm drains. Doing so will pollute creeks and streams.

Around the house:

  • Inspect the plumbing system to see that there are no leaks.
  • Install reduced-flow showerheads (2.5 gallons/minute).
  • Check all faucets, inside and out, for drips. Make repairs promptly. These problems get worse-never better.
  • Teach children to turn water faucets off quickly and tightly after each use.
  • A toilet leak can waste lots of water. Put a small amount of food coloring into the tank. If the color trickles into the bowl, there is a leak and repairs are needed.
  • Never use the toilet as a trash basket for facial tissues, etc.

Make water conservation a family event:

  • Play a water-wise version of "Red Light, Green Light" in the backyard
  • Design a Water Smart Landscape
  • Sign a Water Conservation Pledge
  • Help Shower Lock Holmes solve a "Simple Case of How Much"
  • Calculate how much water your family is using in the shower

Making your home and family more efficient with sustainable water use will benefit not only your community, but Mother Nature in general. Fall is just around the corner and with the drop in temperatures, your garden and lawn will recover and thank you by providing the softest outdoor play space around.

For more information on drought-friendly gardening tips, visit: http://www.scotts.com/smg/learn/infoHowToArticle.jsp?detailId=19400068.


Should I add clover to my lawn?

By Rob Wendell, CEO
NaturesFinestSeed a division of Granite Seed Company

Prior to the 1950s, clover was a part of most grass seed mixes for lawns. Clover’s ability to reseed itself and stay green was considered an advantage in the pursuit of a beautiful, green lawn. Over the years lawn seed mixes have generally dropped the clover and gone with all grasses, but this is not necessarily a good idea. Clover lawns are making a comeback due to clover’s drought-tolerant and low-maintenance qualities.

Clover used to be added in grass seed mixtures because it held so many nitrogen nutrients that helped lawn grow lush and full. In fact, every time you mow your lawn you are adding the clover clippings back into the ground and spurring incredible growth.

Low-Traffic

White clover has flowers that bees love. That’s where you get clover honey. That’s also why a clover yard is best in low-traffic areas–you wouldn’t want to step on those bees. Clover grows two to eight inches tall and needs little to no mowing. Clover is rich in nitrogen and successful at crowding out other weeds. It also naturally helps to keep out chinch bugs that eat grass–especially St. Augustine, bermuda, and zoysia grasses.

Clovers sweet smell attracts bees during the spring and summer months. More bees on your lawn mean that there will be an increase in cross-pollination of flowers which is beneficial to your garden.

White Flowers

Clover is lush to walk on, and you can keep it mowed to avoid the white flowers that attract those bees that can sting bare feet. However, due to colony collapse, clover fields do a great job to help bees survive. Parkways or perimeters landscaped with clover might offer a perennial green look that you love.

Clover is not in the same category as the dandelion (looks beautiful but is really harmful). Clover looks beautiful, smells great, and is a virtual nutrient bank for your lawn. Instead of getting rid of the clover, you should appreciate it for the many life-giving benefits that it offers your lawn.

One of the overlooked benefits of a clover filled lawn is that the clover actually crowds out a lot of the other weeds that are more harmful to your lawn. Clover takes up the space that various molds and mildews might otherwise occupy.

If you have never walked barefoot through a lawn filled with clover, you are missing out on one of the greatest feelings in the world. Clover is so soft and supple. It feels much better than natural grass and smells better, also.


Gardening tips

If the weatherman has predicted a hard freeze, it is best to cover those tomato plants or harvest the green tomatoes before they are damaged by freezing weather. Many of those green tomatoes will ripen. Place them on a tray in the pantry or, for faster results, put a few in a bag with an apple. The apple will release a gas that hastens ripening.

Have a favorite gardening tip you’d like to share? Texas Gardener’s Seeds is seeking brief gardening tips from Texas gardeners to use in future issues. If we publish your tip in Seeds, we will send you a free Texas Gardener 2011 Planning Guide & Calendar. Please send your tips of 50 words or less to the editor at: Gardening Tips.


Did you know...

Monarch butterflies are found throughout Texas. Millions of them travel to central Mexico where they spend the winter. The larval monarch butterflies live on milkweed plant species. So, be sure to plant some milkweed species for the larvae in addition to plants like lantana, frostweed and blue mistflower that provide nectar to the adult butterflies.


Upcoming garden events.

If you would like your organization’s events included in "Upcoming Garden Events" or would like to make a change to a listed event, please contact us at Garden Events. To ensure inclusion in this column, please provide complete details at least three weeks prior to the event.

San Antonio: Bexar County Master Gardeners class 54 and AgriLife Extension will present “Old-Fashioned Roses and Perennials” fro 4 p.m. until 8 p.m. Wednesday, November 9, at Christ Lutheran Church of Alamo Heights, 6720 Broadway, San Antonio. Dr. William “Bill” Welch, author of several gardening books, professor, and outstanding speaker, will share his vast horticultural knowledge. Dr. Welch’s latest book, Heirloom Gardening in the South, co-authored with Texas Gardener columnist Greg Grant, will be available for purchase and signing by Dr. Welch. A portion of the proceeds helps fund the William (Bill) C. Welch Landscape horticulture scholarship fund which annually awards two $2,000 scholarships, one to an undergraduate and one to a graduate student. To learn more about Dr. Welch, visit http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/southerngarden/billbio.html. For more information, contact MG Sandy Justice at sandy.justice@bexarcountymastergardeners.org. Donation to help defray expenses would be appreciated but not required.

Rockport: Darlene Goorish, Master Gardener, will present "Winter Care of Tropicals" from noon until 1 p.m., Tuesday, November 15, at the Aransas County Library, 701 E. Mimosa, Rockport. For additional information, call (361)-790-0103.

Comal County: Applications are now being accepted for the Comal Master Gardeners classes starting January 18 and running through May 2, 2012. Class size is limited to 30. For more information, visit http://txmg.org/comal/, call AgriLife at 830-620-3440, or email vicepresident@mastergardener.comal.tx.us.

Houston: The Great Plants for Houston Fruit Tree Sale will take place at the Texas AgriLife Cooperative Extension, 3033 Bear Creek Dr., Houston. The sale opens at 9 a.m. and closes at 1 p.m., Saturday, January, 28, 2012. The fruit tree varieties offered at the sale will be adaptable to grow and produce in the Houston area climate. See a selection of avocado, apple, fig, persimmon, pomegranate, plum, pecan, peach and even surprises such as blackberry bushes. Arrive early; those blackberry bushes always sell out fast. An “Ask a Master Gardner” booth in the Extension auditorium will be staffed by experts ready to discuss garden, fruit tree planting and pruning questions. There will be a garden book sale In the Extension Lobby offering the latest in information about gardening. For more information, call 281-855-5600.

MONTHLY MEETINGS

Houston: The Harris County Master Gardeners meet at noon the first Tuesday of each month at the Texas AgriLife Extension, 3033 Bear Creek Drive (near the intersection of Highway 6 and Patterson Road), Houston. For additional information visit http://hcmga.tamu.edu or call 281-855-5600.

Rockport: Monthly meetings of the Aransas/San Patricio Master Gardeners are held at 10 a.m. on the first Tuesday of each month at Texas AgriLife Extension Service - Aransas County Office, 611 E. Mimosa, Rockport. For additional information, e-mail aransas-tx@tamu.edu or call 361-790-0103.

Wichita Falls: The Wichita County Master Gardener Association meets at 5:30 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 600 Scott Street, Wichita Falls, on the first Tuesday of each month. For more information, visit http://www.overthegardengate.org or call 940-716-8610.

Kilgore: Northeast Texas Organic Gardeners meets at 1 p.m. on the first Wednesday of each month. For more information, call Carole Ramke at 903-986-9475.

Allen: The Allen Garden Club meets at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month, February through December, at the Allen Heritage Center, 100 E. Main St., Allen. For more information, visit www.allengardenclub.org.

Brownwood: The Brown County Master Gardeners Association meets the first Thursday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 605 Fisk Ave., Brownwood. For further information, call Mary Green Engle at 325-784-8453.

Gonzalas: Gonzales Master Gardeners Association holds their monthly meeting on the first Thursday of each month. A short program is presented. The meeting is held from noon until 1 p.m. at 1405 Conway St. (Odd Fellows Lodge). Bring a bag lunch, drinks provided. Contact AgriLife Extension Office at 830-672-8531 or e-mail gonzales@ag.tamu.edu for more information.

Austin: Austin Organic Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. on the second Monday of each month at the Zilker Botanical Gardens in Austin. For more information, visit www.main.org/aog.

Marion: The Guadalupe County (Schertz/Seguin) Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets on the second Tuesday of each month except July and August at The Library, 500 Bulldog, Marion. There is a plant exchange and meet-and-greet begins at 6:30 p.m. followed by the program at 7 p.m. Visitors are welcome. For more information or an application to join NPSOT visit www.npsot.org/GuadalupeCounty/ or contact contact guadalupecounty@npsot.org.

Longview: The Gregg County Master Gardeners Association meets the second Wednesday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 405 E. Marshall Ave., Longview. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program preceding the business meeting. For further information call Cindy Gill at 903-236-8429 or visit www.gregg-tx.tamu.edu.

Rockport: The Rockport Herb & Rose Study Group, founded in March 2003, meets the second Wednesday of each month at 10 a.m. at 619 N. Live Oak Street, Room 14, Rockport, to discuss all aspects of using and growing herbs, including historical uses and tips for successful propagation and cultivation. Sometimes they take field trips and have cooking demonstrations in different locations. For more information, contact Linda 361-729-6037, Ruth 361-729-8923 or Cindy 979-562-2153 or visit www.rockportherbs.org and http://rockportherbies.blogspot.com.

Beaumont: The Jefferson County Master Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the AgriLife Extension Office, 1225 Pearl Street, Suite 200, Beaumont. For more information, call 409-835-8461.

Brownwood: Brown County Master Gardeners Association meets the second Thursday of each month, from Noon to 1 p.m., at the Brown County AgriLife Extension Office, 605 Fisk, Brownwood. For additional information, call Freda Day 325-643-1077, or Mary Engle 325-784-8453.

Georgetown: The Williamson County Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the Georgetown Public Library, 402 W. 8th Street. Georgetown. For additional information, contract Billye Adams at 512-863-9636 or visit http://www.npsot.org/WilliamsonCounty/default.htm.

Orange: The Orange County Master Gardeners meet at the Salvation Army in Orange on the second Thursday of each month. A covered-dish dinner at 6:30 p.m. is followed by a speaker and business meeting at 7 p.m.

San Antonio: The San Antonio Herb Society meets at 7 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month at the San Antonio Garden Center, 3310 N. New Braunfels (corner of Funston & N. New Braunfels). For more information on programs, visit www.sanantonioherbs.org.

College Station: The A&M Garden Club meets on the second Friday of each month during the school year at 9:30 am at the Peace Lutheran Church, 2201 Rio Grande, College Station. Expert speakers, plant sharing, and federated club projects help members learn about gardening in the Brazos Valley, floral design, conservation, and more. For more information, visit http://www.amgardenclub.com/.

Dallas: The Rainbow Garden Club of North Texas meets the second Sunday of each month at 2 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Meetings are held at member’s homes and garden centers around the area. For more information, visit www.RainbowGardenClub.com.

Arlington: The Arlington Men's Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the third Monday of each month (except December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact Lance Jepson at LJepson@aol.com.

Cleburne: The Johnson County Master Gardeners meet at 2 p.m. on the third Monday of each month at McGregor House, 1628 W. Henderson, Cleburne, which includes a program and a meet & greet. For more information, call Diane Asberry at 817-558-3932.

Sugar Land: The Sugar Land Garden Club meets on the third Tuesday of each month, September through November and January through April at 10 a.m. at the Sugar Land Community Center, 226 Matlage Way, Sugar Land. The club hosts a different speaker each month. For more information, visit www.sugarlandgardenclub.org.

Denton: The Denton Organic Society, a group devoted to sharing information and educating the public regarding organic principles, meets the third Wednesday of each month (except July, August and December) at the Denton Senior Center, 509 N. Bell Avenue. Meetings are free and open to the public. Meetings begin at 7 p.m. and are preceded by a social at 6:30. For more information, call 940-382-8551.

Glen Rose: The Somervell County Master Gardeners meet at 10 a.m., the third Wednesday of each month at the Somervell County AgriLife Extension office, 1405 Texas Drive, Glen Rose. Visitors are welcome. For more information, call 254-897-2809 or visit www.somervellmastergardeners.org.

Granbury: The Lake Granbury Master Gardeners meet at 1 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at the Hood County Annex 1, 1410 West Pearl Street, Granbury. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program each month preceding the business meeting. For information on topics call 817-579-3280 or visit http://www.hoodcountymastergardeners.org/.

Seabrook: The Harris County Precinct 2 Master Gardeners hold an educational program at 10 a.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at The Meeting Room at Clear Lake Park (on the Lakeside), 5001 NASA Road 1, Seabrook. The programs are free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu.

Houston: The Native Plant Society of Texas — Houston (NPSOT-H) meets at 7 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except for October (4th Thursday) and December (2nd Thursday). Location varies. For locations, for more information on programs, and for information about native plants for Houston, visit http://www.npsot.org/Houston.

Rosenberg: The Fort Bend Master Gardeners meet at 7:00 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except December at the Bud O’Shieles Community Center located at 1330 Band Road, Rosenberg. For more information, call 281-341-7068 or visit www.fbmg.com.

Seguin: The Guadalupe County Master Gardeners meets at 7 p.m. the third Thursday of each month, except December, at the Texas AgriLife Extension Bldg. at 210 E. Live Oak, Seguin. An educational program precedes the business meeting. The public is invited to attend. For topic or other information, call 830-379-1972 or visit www.guadalupecountymastergardeners.org.

Atlanta: The Caddo Wildflower Chapter of Native Plants Society meets the fourth Tuesday of each month at the Horne Enterprise building in Atlanta at 7 p.m. Visitors are welcome. For additional information, contact Kay Lowery at frostkay268@aol.com.

Brackenridge Park: The Native Plant Society San Antonio Chapter meets every fourth Tuesday of each month at 7:00 p.m. in the Lions Field Adult and Senior Center, 2809 Broadway at E. Mulberry, Brackenridge Park, except August and December. Social and seed/plant exchange at 6:30 p.m. Free and open to the public. For more information, contact Bea at 210-999-7292 or visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio.

Edna: The Jackson County Master Gardeners present their "Come Grown With Us" seminars on the fourth Tuesday of each month, January through October, beginning at 7 p.m. at 411 N. Wells, Edna. The seminars are free, open to the public and offer 2 CEU hours to Master Gardeners or others requiring them. For additional information, contact the Jackson County Extension Office at 361-782-3312.

Fort Worth: The Organic Garden Club of Forth Worth meets at 7 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday of each month except July and December at the Fort Worth Botanic Gardens main building. Refreshments are served. For more information, call 817-263-9322 or visit www.ogcfw.webs.com.

San Antonio: The Native Plant Society of Texas San Antonio Chapter meets the fourth Tuesday of the month, except August and December, at the Lions Field Adult & Senior Center, 2809 Broadway, San Antonio. Social and plant/seed exchange at 6:30 p.m., program at 7:00 p.m. For more information, visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio or call Bea at 210-999-7292.

Leander: The Leander Garden Club meets on the fourth Thursday of each month (except July and August) at 10:30 a.m. at the Leander Presbyterian Church, 101 N. West Drive, Leander, unless there is a field trip or an event at a member's home. Following a short business meeting, there is usually a program, followed by a shared pot-luck luncheon. To confirm the meeting place and time, please call Cathy Clark-Ramsey at 512-963-4698 or email texascatalina@yahoo.com.

Dallas: The Dallas Organic Garden Club meets at 2:30 p.m. on the fourth Sunday of each month at the North Haven Gardens, 7700 Northaven Rd., Dallas. For more information, call 214-824-2448 or visit www.dogc.org.

Arlington: The Arlington Organic Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the last Thursday of each month (except November and December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact David at 817) 483-7746.


Sale! A book so good, even the insects like it

That’s right. We have a small quantity of The Vegetable Book that have been nibbled on by silverfish. The result is very minor cosmetic damage. We can’t sell them as new books at full price so we are forced to drastically reduce the price to $21.21 (includes tax and shipping). That is a steep discount off the regular price! This should appeal to all the tightwads out there as well as those who would like to have a second, not-so-perfect copy of Dr. Cotner’s timeless classic to carry with them to the garden as a working copy. Hurry while supplies last!

$21.21 includes tax and shipping! (while supplies last)

Order by calling 1-800-727-9020 or order on-line.

(Discover, MasterCard and Visa accepted.)


The Texas Tomato Lover's Handbook

The best thing for tomato enthusiasts since the tomato itself! William D. Adams draws on more than thirty years' experience to provide a complete, step-by-step guide to success in the tomato patch. Learn everything from soil preparation, planting, feeding, caging and watering. Liberally sprinkled with the author's easy humor and illustrated with his own excellent photographs, the must have book has everything you'll need to assure a bumper crop! 189 pages. Lots of color photographs!

Only $26.69 for Seeds readers! Free shipping!

To take advantage of this special offer, call toll-free 1-800-727-9020.

Visa, MasterCard and Discover accepted.


In Greg's Garden:
A Pineywoods Perspective on Gardening, Nature and Family

An intimate and personal exploration of the life of one of Texas’s most beloved gardeners, In Greg’s Garden: A Pineywoods Perspective on Gardening, Nature and Family gathers in a single volume the first nine years of Greg Grant’s columns from Texas Gardener magazine.

Revised and updated from their original publication, these 54 essays reveal the heart and soul of a seventh generation native Texan who has devoted his entire life to gardening, nature and family. With degrees in floriculture and horticulture from Texas A&M University and extensive hands-on experience as a horticulturist with the Texas Agricultural Extension Service, Stephen F. Austin State University, Mercer Arboretum and San Antonio Botanical Gardens, Grant has successfully introduced dozens of plants to the Texas nursery industry, all while maintaining long-held family property and renovating the homes of his ancestors in Arcadia, Texas.

In Greg’s Garden: A Pineywoods Perspective on Gardening, Nature and Family is a must-read for every Texas gardener.

Available only for Kindle. Order directly from Amazon by clicking here.


Wish you'd saved them?

Are you missing an important issue of Texas Gardener? Or, perhaps, just tired of thumbing through stacks of back issues looking for the tips and techniques you need to make your garden grow? These new CDs provide easy access to all six issues of
volume 20 (November/December 2000 through September/October 2001),
volume 21
(November/December 2001 through September/October 2002),
volume 22
(November/December 2002 through September/October 2003),
volume 23
(November/December 2003 through September/October 2004),
volume 24 (November/December 2004 through September/October 2005),
volume 25 (November/December 2005 through September/October 2006),
volume 26 (November/December 2006 through September/October 2007),
volume 27 (November/December 2007 through September/October 2008),
volume 28 (November/December 2008 through September/October 2009),
volume 29 (November/December 2009 through September/October 2010), and
volume 30 (November/December 2010 through September/October 2011)*.

$16.99 per CD includes tax and shipping

Order by calling 1-800-727-9020.

(Discover, MasterCard and Visa accepted.)

*Other volumes will be available soon.


Fiber row cover valuable year-round

Grow-Web encourages plant growth and development, and also provides protection from insects, birds, diseases and frosts. It is also air and water permeable and allows for ventilation. Grow-Web provides excellent protection to seedlings when applied directly to the seedbed.

$31.88 per 12.3’ x 32.8’ roll (includes shipping!)

Order by calling 1-800-727-9020 or order on-line.

(Discover, MasterCard and Visa accepted.)


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Become a fan of Texas Gardener magazine on Facebook. See what we're up to at http://www.facebook.com/pages/Texas-Gardener-Magazine/301356291835?ref=nf.


Texas Gardener’s Seeds is published weekly. © Suntex Communications, Inc. 2011. All rights reserved. You may forward this publication to your friends and colleagues if it is sent in its entirety. No individual part of this newsletter may be reproduced in any manner without prior written permission from the publisher.

Missed an issue? Back issues of Texas Gardener’s Seeds are available at www.texasgardener.com/newsletters.

Publisher: Chris S. Corby ● Editor: Michael Bracken

Texas Gardener’s Seeds, P.O. Box 9005, Waco, Texas 76714 ● www.TexasGardener.com