May 9, 2012

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$1 Million gift to create Family Garden at Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

The University of Texas at Austin Office of University Communications

Luci Baines Johnson and Ian Turpin have donated $1 million to the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center of The University of Texas at Austin to develop a Family Garden that will bear their name.

“Lady Bird Johnson’s legacy to America’s natural heritage can’t be overstated,” said university President Bill Powers, who joined Johnson and Wildflower Center Executive Director Susan Rieff in announcing the gift this morning. “So it’s fitting that Luci and Ian’s generous gift of $1 million will strengthen and extend into the future this family’s extraordinary commitment to education about and appreciation of our natural world. They have my deepest thanks.”

The Luci Baines Johnson and Ian Turpin Family Garden will be designed to foster hands-on, creative play and learning as children explore nature on 4.5 acres of native plant gardens.

“Mother’s dream was that the Wildflower Center would inspire future generations to care for and take care of the environment,” said Luci Baines Johnson, the younger daughter of Lady Bird and President Lyndon Baines Johnson. “By providing this gift, Ian and I have the chance of a lifetime to help Mother’s dream come true, just as she did so many of ours.”

The Family Garden, which was designed by landscape architect W. Gary Smith, will also be a model of green landscaping as a pilot project of the Sustainable Sites Initiative. The effort, a Wildflower Center partnership with the American Society of Landscape Architects and the United States Botanic Garden, has developed the most comprehensive national system for rating the design, construction and maintenance of sustainable landscapes.

“The Wildflower Center is deeply grateful to Luci and Ian for helping us create a magical garden world for children and families as well as a showcase for sustainable landscapes,” Rieff said.

Among the Family Garden features will be:

  • A Metamorphosis Maze of 3-foot-tall native hedges that children can wander through while learning about animal life cycles
  • A Giant Bird Nests woven from native vines that allow children to climb inside and experience a bird’s eye view
  • Water features such as a wading creek with replicas of dinosaur tracks nearby and a walk-in grotto that contains copies of petroglyphs and is cooled by a waterfall running across its roof
  • An elevated boardwalk for viewing trees, and an open-air pavilion topped by solar panels next to a 1-acre play lawn covered with Habiturf, a mixture of native grasses that the center has developed

The Wildflower Center has envisioned a children’s garden on its site since it unveiled its master plan by Smith in 2005. Horticulture Director Andrea DeLong-Amaya and other staffers will install native plants used with garden features. The garden’s construction will feature locally sourced stone, sustainably harvested wood and other environmentally friendly options.

The Wildflower Center is a self-sustaining organized research unit of the university. The Luci Baines Johnson and Ian Turpin gift is the largest of $2.52 million received so far from individuals and private foundations to build the Family Garden. Construction is expected to cost $3.7 million, with $1.3 million more sought to maintain the Family Garden.

A groundbreaking for the garden will occur in the next year as part of celebrating the centennial of Lady Bird Johnson’s birth. The Texas Legislature has declared 2012 Lady Bird Johnson Centennial Year, and the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center also commemorates its 30th anniversary this year.


State leaders unveil the Texas Wildfire Risk Assessment portal

Texas Forest Service

Officials with Texas Forest Service and The Texas A&M University System gathered with state lawmakers in April to unveil new web applications that will help homeowners and communities determine wildfire risk — and take measures to mitigate potential hazards.

Wildfires scorched almost 4 million acres across the state last year, destroying nearly 3,000 homes. Texas Forest Service officials say the new web applications will arm Texans with the tools they need to reduce threats from future blazes.

"Making a fundamental difference in the lives of students in the Texas A&M University System is something we try to do every day,” said John Sharp, chancellor of the Texas A&M System. “But today we hope to make a difference in the lives of all Texans with this TxWRAP program from the Texas Forest Service."

Texas Wildfire Risk Assessment Portal, or TxWRAP, allows users to identify wildfire threats for a particular area based on landscape characteristics, historical fire occurrence, weather conditions, terrain and potential fire behavior. It also routes users to resources that can help them implement wildfire prevention practices.

Accessible at texaswildfirerisk.com, the applications are free to use. Professional users such as civic planners, wildland fire managers and elected officials can use TxWRAP to generate a report packaging all the wildfire risk data for their community. Such a tool can be useful in defining mitigation options, allocating resources and prioritizing programs that will better protect communities.

Developed by Texas Forest Service GIS specialists, TxWRAP is the first web portal of its kind in the nation granting public access to risk assessment data that previously hasn’t been readily available, particularly in a user-friendly format.

Texas Forest Service Director Tom Boggus called the website a “holistic approach to Texans helping Texans mitigate their wildfire risk.”

“This can and should be a ‘game changer’ for Texans as they learn what their risks are and how to mitigate them,” Boggus said. “It is a tool that neighbor can pass on to neighbor, making Texas a safer place to live.”

Texas Senators Kirk Watson and Royce West have committed their support to the project.

“During a January interim hearing of the Senate Committee on Intergovernmental Relations, my colleagues and I were excited to hear about the Texas Wildfire Risk Assessment Portal,” West said. “This website will enable homeowners, civic leaders, community planners, elected officials and others to identify the risk wildfire poses to their communities. Developed by Texas Forest Service, this tool empowers Texans to be able to better protect their homes and property.”

Watson added: “The devastating fires in Central Texas last fall revealed how we need strong collaboration between local, county and state officials. This new Wildfire Risk Assessment Tool furthers the potential for this critical collaboration in disaster management and risk assessment. It’s an important resource for Texans to plan, protect and act.”


Parasitic weeds attack crops worldwide, but solutions have been local

Weed Science

Witchweed, a parasitic weed that can strangle crops, has been nearly extinguished in the United States. But in Africa and Asia, it still grows rampantly, posing a threat to crops and forests. One estimate places agricultural losses due to a single variety of witchweed at $1 billion per year.

A published symposium in the journal Weed Science discusses several species of parasitic weeds, including witchweeds, broomrapes, dodders, and mistletoes, and the control measures being taken against them. The crops most affected by these weeds include corn, rice, sorghum, millets, and sugar cane.

Although parasitic weeds are problematic worldwide, eastern and southern countries of Africa are seeing major infestations of witchweed affecting crops. The same variety of this plant has been seen in the United States. In India, sorghum and sugar cane crops are being damaged by witchweed, although the impact is not as widespread.

Witchweed species depend on a host plant for their nutrition. They also reduce the process of photosynthesis in the host. Sorghum infested with witchweed may experience a 62 percent reduction in its photosynthetic ability. Plants show symptoms of drought stress — wilting and increased root development — when attacked by parasitic weeds.

In the United States, complicated control methods have helped bring these weeds to heel. These include the use of ethylene gas, methyl bromide, herbicides, and intensive quarantine and monitoring procedures. Partially resistant varieties of corn, rice, and sorghum have been developed, although they are not yet widely available. However, none of these methods can be easily transferred to African fields.

Partial control of these parasitic weeds has been achieved in some locations through cultural practices. The use of green manure — growing a cover crop then turning it under when green to add nutrients to the soil — has successfully suppressed these parasitic weeds. In Tanzania, legume crops turned into green manure have allowed rice fields to thrive.

Despite significant efforts over many years, parasitic weeds have not been reduced on a large scale. Most successful efforts at eradication have taken place on a local level. Current research is now trending toward genetically resistant crops. In Africa, increasing soil fertility, and particularly nitrogen for cereal crops, will build resistance to these weeds. Continued research and efforts are needed to maintain the world’s food and timber supplies.


Attention tomato-loving Texas gardeners

Do you have a favorite, no-fail, wouldn’t-have-a-garden-without-it tomato variety? Texas Gardener wants to know and we will publish the top vote-getters in the January/February 2013 issue.

Please send us your name, along with your responses and favorite tomato photos, to info@texasgardener.com or mail to us at Tomato Survey, PO Box 9005, Waco, TX 76714. Please send photos as JPG or TIFF files if sending as e-mail attachments or color prints if sending by mail. Be sure to include your town or region in Texas. Deadline for inclusion in the survey is August 31, 2012.

What is your all-around favorite tomato and why?

Which variety is most productive?

Which variety has the best flavor?

What is your favorite heirloom?

What is your favorite cherry?

What is your favorite slicer?

Which variety has shown the best disease- and insect-resistance?

Submitted by:

Email address:

City:


Gardening tips

It is starting to get too hot to plant many spring crops like squash and green beans but some crops can tolerate our hot summers very well. Southern peas, okra, sweet potatoes and Malabar spinach can be planted now for a successful summer harvest.

Have a favorite gardening tip you’d like to share? Texas Gardener’s Seeds is seeking brief gardening tips from Texas gardeners to use in future issues. If we publish your tip in Seeds, we will send you a free Texas Gardener 2012 Planning Guide & Calendar. Please send your tips of 50 words or less to the editor at: Gardening Tips.


Did you know...

One rule of thumb used to distinguish beneficial insects from insect pests is how fast they move. The good insects move much more quickly because they are predators, while the bad guys are usually slow movers because they feed on plants and do not need to be very fast. Source: Garden Problem Solver published by Mitchell Beazley.


Upcoming garden events.

If you would like your organization’s events included in "Upcoming Garden Events" or would like to make a change to a listed event, please contact us at Garden Events. To ensure inclusion in this column, please provide complete details at least three weeks prior to the event.

Austin: Gardens on Tour 2012, a fund raiser for the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, will take place from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. Saturday, May 12, rain or shine, at five private Austin gardens and the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, 4801 La Crosse Ave., Austin. The beauty and versatility of native plants and wildflowers will be on display at this Mother’s Day weekend tour, when exquisite private gardens are showcased Saturday only. The amazing gardens at the Wildflower Center will also be on the self-guided tour. All gardens incorporate plants well-adapted to our climate, and individual gardens feature design ideas such as outdoor living areas, low-water use landscapes, a three-tiered waterfall and an art exhibit space. Small, urban gardens are a highlight this year, with experts on hand at each site to answer garden questions. A special shuttle bus tour of the gardens that includes refreshments and guided garden tours is new to this year’s visit options. Book bus tour tickets online by calling 512-232-0137 in advance (limited spaces available). Tickets for individual gardens are available on site at the gardens. Or purchase a self-guided tour wristband at a garden for visiting all six gardens. The wristband can also be purchased online, or at the following area retailers: Barton Springs Nursery, 3601 Bee Caves Rd.; TreeHouse, 4477 S. Lamar Blvd., Suite 600; Shoal Creek Nursery, 2710 Hancock Dr.; The Natural Gardener, 8648 Old Bee Caves Rd.; Wildflower Center Store, 4801 La Crosse Ave. Admission: Individual tickets for each garden: $6; Gardens on Tour wristbands for all six gardens: $25; shuttle bus tour with refreshments and guided tours of each garden: $75. Children under 5 will be admitted free of charge. For online ticket purchase information, garden directions and descriptions, visit www.wildflower.org/gardentour. Information also is available at 512-232-0100.

Conroe: Learn about the impact of drought on Texas's forests, trees, and communities beginning at 9:30 a.m., Saturday, May 12. Participate in an interactive tour at Jones State Forest, visit with professionals, and explore forest sites managed with different strategies, salvage sites, Best Management Practices stations, and learn about reforestation plans for forest, ponds, and wildlife. The tour, sponsored by the Montgomery-Harris County Forest Landowners Association and Texas Forest Service will meet at the W.G. Jones State Forest Classroom, 1328 FM 1488, Conroe. Call 936-273-2261 for more information.

Dallas: Boost native butterfly populations with help from Texas Discovery Gardens’ Butterfly Gardening Workshop and Butterfly Plant Sale. Butterfly populations are up with our warm winter, and with water restrictions in Dallas, now is the time to introduce native and adapted butterfly plants to your landscape. The annual Butterfly Plant Sale May 12 showcases many drought tolerant native and adapted plants. Many of the selections have been grown organically onsite at Texas Discovery Gardens by staff and volunteers. New this year, plants have been treated with the organic Worm Wine (vermicompost, rain barrel water and molasses), by Texas Worm Ranch. There will also be a second Plant Safari Saturday, May 12, as well as a make-up sale day for the following Saturday, May 19, for those who can’t make it out to the Butterfly Plant Sale. Native Plant Safari Guided Tour: Visitors will see established butterfly plants and learn about their maintenance during the second annual Native Plant Safari, led by Randy Johnson, Director of Horticulture. A second Plant Safari will be held Saturday morning. Registration is strongly encouraged. Participants will be able to go directly from the Native Plant Safari to the Butterfly Plant Sale Preview. The Native Plant Safari Guided Tour will be held from 2 p.m.-4 p.m., Friday, May 11, and again from 8 a.m.-10 a.m. Saturday, May 12. Cost: $15; $10 for garden members. The Butterfly Plant Sale, featuring hard-to-find plants that attract butterflies, hummingbirds, and other wildlife, will have a Member's Special Preview Night: Friday, May 11 from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. and will be open to everyone Saturday, May 12 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Texas Discovery Gardens, 3601 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Dallas (inside Gate 6 at Fair Park). For additional information, visit TexasDiscoveryGardens.org.

Denton: Denton County Master Gardener Association 2012 Spring Garden Tour will take place Saturday, May 12, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. rain or shine. Visit four beautiful personal Master Gardeners’ gardens and three bonus gardens. Tickets are $8 in advance or $10 at any garden on tour day. Children under 14 are free (no strollers please). For more information, visit www.dcmga.com.

Ft. Worth: "Lawns & How to Irrigate Responsibly" will be offered from 1 p.m. until 5 p.m. May 12 in the fifth floor conference room at the Tarrant County Plaza Building, 200 Taylor St., Ft. Worth. $15 enrollment. Advance reservations are preferred, but not required. Contact the AgriLife office at 817-884-1945 for more information or to enroll.

La Marque: Galveston County Home Fruit Grower’s Tour, Saturday, May 12, 9 a.m. – noon. Three fruit orchards are on this year’s tour. Vegetable gardens at each site will also be open. This year’s tour sites contain a wide variety of fruit trees ranging from a peach orchard (Fruit ’n Such Orchard located at 6309 Avenue U in Texas City), the Master Gardener Demonstration Orchard (located in Carbide Park in La Marque) and a sizeable home orchard in Santa Fe. (No pre-registration needed; visit sites in any desired order.) Galveston County Master Gardener Bill Verm’s home and backyard at 5202 Highland Road, Santa Fe; Galveston County Master Gardener demonstration orchard and garden at 4102 B Main Street, Carbide Park in La Marque; Wilson and Renee Hillman’s Fruits ’n Such orchard at 6309 Ave U, Dickinson (located off Bowerman Road and FM 517). For more information, call 281-534-3413, ext. 12 or email GALV3@wt.net.

San Antonio: The 10th Annual Herb Affair with the Comal Master Gardeners will take place from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m., Saturday, May 12, at the Antique Rose Emporium, 7561 E. Evans Road, San Antonio. For additional information call 210-651-4565 or visit www.weAREroses.com.

Houston: Jean Fefer, Ph.D., will share ideas on "What to Plant and Do Now" in your garden in May beginning at 6:30 p.m., May 14, at the Houston Garden Center, 1500 Hermann Dr. in Hermann Park, Houston. She will discuss what can still be planted and share ideas for early planning for the fall garden. Her talk will be illustrated with color slides. She may share news about the successes and failures at Turning Point, the donation garden she and her husband maintain. For more information, call 713-284-1989.

Marion: Liz Palfini, M.S. in Botany, of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, will present a program about identifying native plants for landscape value at the May 15 meeting of the Native Plant Society of Texas Guadalupe County (Schertz-Seguin) Chapter. The meeting will be held at The Marion Library Meeting Room, 500 Bulldog Lane, Marion. There will be a plant/seed exchange and welcome at 6:30 p.m. followed by the program at 7 p.m. For more information, visit https://npsot.org/GuadalupeCounty/.

Seabrook: Bob Patterson, Southwest Fertilizers, will lecture on "Fertilizers" at 10 a.m., Wednesday, May 16, at The Meeting Room at Clear Lake Park (on the lakeside), 5001 NASA Parkway, Seabrook. This lecture is free and open to the public.

Austin: “Preparing Your Landscape for Summer” will be presented from 10 a.m. until noon, Thursday, May 17, at the Travis County AgriLife Extension Office. 1600 B Smith Rd., Austin. There are numerous things to do to ensure healthier, bushier, plants with increased blooms. Learn when to fertilize which plants, which plants to pinch back and other tips from a pro. This seminar is free and open to the public. It is presented by the Travis County Master Gardeners, a volunteer arm of the Texas AgriLife Extension Service in Travis County. For information, call 512-854-9600 or visit www.tcmastergardeners.org.

Jacksboro: The Jacksboro Garden Club will host a Garden Tour and Luncheon on Thursday, May 17 from 10 a.m until 12:45 p.m.. Tour four gardens which have never been open to the public before at your leisure and at 1:00 lunch will be served in the Main Street Bistro in the historic Eastburn Building across from the courthouse. Tickets are $25.00. Call 940-567-5900 before May 8.

Seguin: Guadalupe County Master Gardeners will meet at 7 p.m., Thursday, May 17, in the AgriLife Extension Bldg. at 210 E. Live Oak in Seguin. Mary Dunford, owner of Nature's Herb Farm, will talk about how herbs can be used in our diet. Meetings are free and open to the public. For more information, visit www.guadalupecountymastergardeners.org or call 830-303-3889.

Nacogdoches: SFA Gardens will host its sixth Lone Star Regional Native Plant Conference May 18-19, on the campus of Stephen F. Austin State University in historic Nacogdoches. SFA is home to the Mast Arboretum, the Ruby M. Mize Azalea Garden, the Gayla Mize Garden, and the Pineywoods Native Plant Center, all part of the Arthur Temple College of Forestry and Agriculture. In addition to great local field trips and a native plant sale, the conference will feature workshops and lectures on many timely topics including drought-tolerant ornamental plants, firewise landscaping, birding by ear, invasive species, wildscaping, native perennials, and landscape design. Join home gardeners and Master Gardeners alike to learn more about uniquely adapted native plants and various Texas ecosystems. For more information visit sfagardens.sfasu.edu or call 936-468-4404.

Austin: A Garden Photography seminar will be held from 10 a.m.-noon, Saturday, June 30, at Zilker Botanical Garden, Garden Center, 2220 Barton Springs Rd., Austin. A retired expert in the field of biotechnology, Texas Gardener contributing photographer Bruce Leander concentrates now on his love of fine art nature photography — macro and landscape. His work with the Wildflower Center has produced a series of stunning plant studies which highlights the fine work being done there. He will share with us the tools and methods he recommends to get started in this fascinating aspect of horticulture. This free class doesn’t require a reservation but if you want to ensure a seat, sign up online at http://travis-tx.tamu.edu/horticulture/ Please note that any empty reserved seats are open seating at 9:50 am. This seminar is presented by the Travis County Master Gardeners, a volunteer arm of the Texas AgriLife Extension Service in Travis County. www.tcmastergardeners.org. For information, call 512-854-9600.

Ft. Worth: Make a Butterfly Puddler from Tarrant County Master Gardeners(TCMGA), Saturday, May 19, 9 a.m.-11 a.m., at the TCMGA Community and Demonstration Garden at the Resource Connection, 1100 Circle Drive, Fort Worth, located off Campus Dr, north from I-20. The make and take class is limited to 20 people and the class fee is $20. To register or for more information, contact Billie Hammack at 817-884-1296 or blhammack@ag.tamu.edu.

La Marque: “Plan before you plant (a hands-on landscape design workshop)” will be presented by Galveston County Master Gardener, Karen Lehr from 9 a.m. until 11:30 a.m., Saturday, May 19, at the Galveston County AgriLife Extension Office in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (FM 519), La Marque. Included in the program will be how to evaluate what is in your landscape at present and how to create your own desired outdoor spaces using landscape design principles and techniques. Also covered in this landscape design workshop will be specific plants that would fit into your landscape plan and are suitable for the Galveston County area. "The Fabulous Fragrant Frangipani (Plumeria)” will be presented by Galveston County Master Gardener Loretta Osteen from 1 p.m. until 3:30 p.m. The program will cover the history, culture, usage of the flowers, storage and winter protection. Subjects covered include propagation by seeds, cuttings and grafting. Members of the Plumeria Society will be present to assist Loretta. For course reservations, call 281-534-3413, ext. 12 or email GALV3@wt.net.

San Antonio: The San Antonio Daylily Society Show and Sale will be at the Antique Rose Emporium, 7561 E. Evans Road, San Antonio, Saturday, May 19. The day begins with a daylily sale on the porch while the judges are busy reviewing the show entries. When judging is complete, the Hacienda doors open with to show off the dazzling display of colors, shapes, and sizes of the daylilies. For more information about this free event, call 210-651-4565 or visit www.weAREroses.com.

San Antonio: A Summer Preparation Workshop (including Fallowing a Garden, Rain Water Harvesting, Drip Irrigation, Cover Crops, and Mulches, will take place at 9 a.m., May 19, at High Country Community Garden, San Antonio. $5 registration fee. For more information, call 210-222-8430. To register, visit www.greensatx.org/upcoming-events/register-for-a-workshop.

Ft. Worth: Learn about Herb Gardening from Tarrant County Master Gardeners (TCMGA), Tuesday, May 22, 10 a.m. – noon, at the TCMGA Community and Demonstration Garden at the Resource Connection, 1100 Circle Drive, Fort Worth, off Campus Dr, north from I-20. Class fee is $5 and limited to 20 people. To register or for more information, contact Billie Hammack at 817-884-1296 or blhammack@ag.tamu.edu.

Fort Worth: Make a cement mushroom from Tarrant County Master Gardeners(TCMGA), Saturday, May 26, 9 – 11 a.m., at the TCMGA Community and Demonstration Garden at the Resource Connection, 1100 Circle Drive, Fort Worth, located off Campus Dr, north from I-20. Class fee is $20 and the class is limited to 20 people. To register or for more information, contact Billie Hammack at 817-884-1296 or blhammack@ag.tamu.edu.

MONTHLY MEETINGS

Houston: The Harris County Master Gardeners meet at noon the first Tuesday of each month at the Texas AgriLife Extension, 3033 Bear Creek Drive (near the intersection of Highway 6 and Patterson Road), Houston. For additional information visit http://hcmga.tamu.edu or call 281-855-5600.

Wichita Falls: The Wichita County Master Gardener Association meets at 5:30 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 600 Scott Street, Wichita Falls, on the first Tuesday of each month. For more information, visit http://www.overthegardengate.org or call 940-716-8610.

Kilgore: Northeast Texas Organic Gardeners meets at 1 p.m. on the first Wednesday of each month. For more information, call Carole Ramke at 903-986-9475.

Allen: The Allen Garden Club meets at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month, February through December, at the Allen Heritage Center, 100 E. Main St., Allen. For more information, visit www.allengardenclub.org.

Brownwood: The Brown County Master Gardeners Association meets the first Thursday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 605 Fisk Ave., Brownwood. For further information, call Mary Green Engle at 325-784-8453.

Gonzalas: Gonzales Master Gardeners Association holds their monthly meeting on the first Thursday of each month. A short program is presented. The meeting is held from noon until 1 p.m. at 1405 Conway St. (Odd Fellows Lodge). Bring a bag lunch, drinks provided. Contact AgriLife Extension Office at 830-672-8531 or e-mail gonzales@ag.tamu.edu for more information.

Austin: Austin Organic Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. on the second Monday of each month at the Zilker Botanical Gardens in Austin. For more information, visit www.main.org/aog.

Evant: The Evant Garden Club meets on the second Tuesday of each month at 10 a.m., usually at the bank in downtown Evant. To confirm the date, time and place of each month's meeting, call 254-471-5585.

Marion: The Guadalupe County (Schertz/Seguin) Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets on the second Tuesday of each month except July and August at The Library, 500 Bulldog, Marion. There is a plant exchange and meet-and-greet begins at 6:30 p.m. followed by the program at 7 p.m. Visitors are welcome. For more information or an application to join NPSOT visit www.npsot.org/GuadalupeCounty/ or contact guadalupecounty@npsot.org.

Jacksboro: The Jacksboro Garden Club meets at 9:30 a.m. the second Wednesday of each month (except June, July and August) at the Concerned Citizens Center, 400 East Pine Street, Jacksboro. For more information, call Melinda at 940-567-6218.

Longview: The Gregg County Master Gardeners Association meets the second Wednesday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 405 E. Marshall Ave., Longview. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program preceding the business meeting. For further information call Cindy Gill at 903-236-8429 or visit www.gregg-tx.tamu.edu.

Rockport: The Rockport Herb & Rose Study Group, founded in March 2003, meets the second Wednesday of each month at 10 a.m. at 619 N. Live Oak Street, Room 14, Rockport, to discuss all aspects of using and growing herbs, including historical uses and tips for successful propagation and cultivation. Sometimes they take field trips and have cooking demonstrations in different locations. For more information, contact Linda 361-729-6037, Ruth 361-729-8923 or Cindy 979-562-2153 or visit www.rockportherbs.org and http://rockportherbies.blogspot.com.

Beaumont: The Jefferson County Master Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the AgriLife Extension Office, 1225 Pearl Street, Suite 200, Beaumont. For more information, call 409-835-8461.

Brownwood: Brown County Master Gardeners Association meets the second Thursday of each month, from Noon to 1 p.m., at the Brown County AgriLife Extension Office, 605 Fisk, Brownwood. For additional information, call Freda Day 325-643-1077, or Mary Engle 325-784-8453.

Georgetown: The Williamson County Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the Georgetown Public Library, 402 W. 8th Street. Georgetown. For additional information, contract Billye Adams at 512-863-9636 or visit http://www.npsot.org/WilliamsonCounty/default.htm.

Orange: The Orange County Master Gardeners Association holds their monthly meeting on the second Thursday of each month. A short program is presented. The meeting starts at 6:30 p.m. at the Salvation Army Bldg. cor. MLK & Strickland in Orange. Pot luck supper at 6 p.m. Visit http://txmg.org/orange for more information.

San Antonio: The San Antonio Herb Society meets at 7 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month at the San Antonio Garden Center, 3310 N. New Braunfels (corner of Funston & N. New Braunfels). For more information on programs, visit www.sanantonioherbs.org.

College Station: The A&M Garden Club meets on the second Friday of each month during the school year at 9:30 am at the Peace Lutheran Church, 2201 Rio Grande, College Station. Expert speakers, plant sharing, and federated club projects help members learn about gardening in the Brazos Valley, floral design, conservation, and more. For more information, visit http://www.amgardenclub.com/.

Houston: The Spring Branch African Violet Club meets the second Saturday of each month, January through November, at 10:30am at the Copperfield Baptist Church, 8350 Highway 6 North, Houston. Call Karla at 281-748-8417 prior to attending to confirm meeting date and time.

Dallas: The Rainbow Garden Club of North Texas meets the second Sunday of each month at 2 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Meetings are held at member’s homes and garden centers around the area. For more information, visit www.RainbowGardenClub.com.

Arlington: The Arlington Men's Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the third Monday of each month (except December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact Lance Jepson at LJepson@aol.com.

Cleburne: The Johnson County Master Gardeners meet at 2 p.m. on the third Monday of each month at McGregor House, 1628 W. Henderson, Cleburne, which includes a program and a meet & greet. For more information, call Sharon Smith at 817-894-7700.

Rockport: Monthly meetings of the Aransas/San Patricio Master Gardeners are held at 10 a.m. on the third Tuesday of each month at Texas AgriLife Extension Service - Aransas County Office, 892 Airport Rd., Rockport. For additional information, e-mail aransas-tx@tamu.edu or call 361-790-0103.

Sugar Land: The Sugar Land Garden Club meets on the third Tuesday of each month, September through November and January through April at 10 a.m. at the Sugar Land Community Center, 226 Matlage Way, Sugar Land. The club hosts a different speaker each month. For more information, visit www.sugarlandgardenclub.org.

Denton: The Denton Organic Society, a group devoted to sharing information and educating the public regarding organic principles, meets the third Wednesday of each month (except July, August and December) at the Denton Senior Center, 509 N. Bell Avenue. Meetings are free and open to the public. Meetings begin at 7 p.m. and are preceded by a social at 6:30. For more information, call 940-382-8551.

Glen Rose: The Somervell County Master Gardeners meet at 10 a.m., the third Wednesday of each month at the Somervell County AgriLife Extension office, 1405 Texas Drive, Glen Rose. Visitors are welcome. For more information, call 254-897-2809 or visit www.somervellmastergardeners.org.

Granbury: The Lake Granbury Master Gardeners meet at 1 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at the Hood County Annex 1, 1410 West Pearl Street, Granbury. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program each month preceding the business meeting. For information on topics call 817-579-3280 or visit http://www.hoodcountymastergardeners.org/.

Seabrook: The Harris County Precinct 2 Master Gardeners hold an educational program at 10 a.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at The Meeting Room at Clear Lake Park (on the Lakeside), 5001 NASA Road 1, Seabrook. The programs are free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu.

Houston: The Native Plant Society of Texas — Houston (NPSOT-H) meets at 7 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except for October (4th Thursday) and December (2nd Thursday). Location varies. For locations, for more information on programs, and for information about native plants for Houston, visit http://www.npsot.org/Houston.

Rosenberg: The Fort Bend Master Gardeners meet at 7:00 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except December at the Bud O’Shieles Community Center located at 1330 Band Road, Rosenberg. For more information, call 281-341-7068 or visit www.fbmg.com.

Seguin: The Guadalupe County Master Gardeners meets at 7 p.m. the third Thursday of each month, except December, at the Texas AgriLife Extension Bldg. at 210 E. Live Oak, Seguin. An educational program precedes the business meeting. The public is invited to attend. For topic or other information, call 830-379-1972 or visit www.guadalupecountymastergardeners.org.

New Braunfels: The Comal Master Gardeners meet at 6 p.m. the fourth Monday of each month at the GVTC Auditorium, 36101 FM 3159, New Braunfels. For additional information, call 830-620-3440.

Atlanta: The Caddo Wildflower Chapter of Native Plants Society meets the fourth Tuesday of each month at the Horne Enterprise building in Atlanta at 7 p.m. Visitors are welcome. For additional information, contact Kay Lowery at frostkay268@aol.com.

Brackenridge Park: The Native Plant Society San Antonio Chapter meets every fourth Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. in the Lions Field Adult and Senior Center, 2809 Broadway at E. Mulberry, Brackenridge Park, except August and December. Social and seed/plant exchange at 6:30 p.m. Free and open to the public. For more information, contact Bea at 210-999-7292 or visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio.

Bryan: The Brazos County Master Gardeners, a program of Texas AgriLife Extension, meet the fourth Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. at the Brazos Center, 3232 Briarcrest Drive, Bryan. There is a public gardening program at each meeting and pertinent information may be found at brazosmg.com or 979-823-0129.

Edna: The Jackson County Master Gardeners present their "Come Grown With Us" seminars on the fourth Tuesday of each month, January through October, beginning at 7 p.m. at 411 N. Wells, Edna. The seminars are free, open to the public and offer 2 CEU hours to Master Gardeners or others requiring them. For additional information, contact the Jackson County Extension Office at 361-782-3312.

Fort Worth: The Organic Garden Club of Forth Worth meets at 7 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday of each month except July and December at the Fort Worth Botanic Gardens main building. Refreshments are served. For more information, call 817-263-9322 or visit www.ogcfw.webs.com.

San Antonio: The Native Plant Society of Texas San Antonio Chapter meets the fourth Tuesday of each month, except August and December, at the Lions Field Adult & Senior Center, 2809 Broadway, San Antonio. Social and plant/seed exchange at 6:30 p.m., program at 7:00 p.m. For more information, visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio or call Bea at 210-999-7292.

Houston: The Houston Chapter of the Native Prairie Association of Texas (HNPAT) meets from 7 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. the fourth Wednesday of each month at Bayland Park Community Center, 6400 Bissonnet, Houston.For more information, contact hnpat@prairies.org.

Leander: The Leander Garden Club meets on the fourth Thursday of each month (except July and August) at 10:30 a.m. at the Leander Presbyterian Church, 101 N. West Drive, Leander, unless there is a field trip or an event at a member's home. Following a short business meeting, there is usually a program, followed by a shared pot-luck luncheon. To confirm the meeting place and time, please call Cathy Clark-Ramsey at 512-963-4698 or email texascatalina@yahoo.com.

Dallas: The Greater Dallas Organic Garden Club meets at 7:00 p.m. on the fourth Thurday of each month at the REI, 4515 LBJ Freeway, Dallas. For more information, call 214-824-2448 or visit www.gdogc.org.

Arlington: The Arlington Organic Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the last Thursday of each month (except November and December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact David at 817-483-7746.


Texas Fruit and Vegetable Gardening — hot off the press!

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In Greg's Garden:
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An intimate and personal exploration of the life of one of Texas’s most beloved gardeners, In Greg’s Garden: A Pineywoods Perspective on Gardening, Nature and Family gathers in a single volume the first nine years of Greg Grant’s columns from Texas Gardener magazine.

Revised and updated from their original publication, these 54 essays reveal the heart and soul of a seventh generation native Texan who has devoted his entire life to gardening, nature and family. With degrees in floriculture and horticulture from Texas A&M University and extensive hands-on experience as a horticulturist with the Texas Agricultural Extension Service, Stephen F. Austin State University, Mercer Arboretum and San Antonio Botanical Gardens, Grant has successfully introduced dozens of plants to the Texas nursery industry, all while maintaining long-held family property and renovating the homes of his ancestors in Arcadia, Texas.

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Wish you'd saved them?

Are you missing an important issue of Texas Gardener? Or, perhaps, just tired of thumbing through stacks of back issues looking for the tips and techniques you need to make your garden grow? These new CDs provide easy access to all six issues of
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volume 21
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volume 24 (November/December 2004 through September/October 2005),
volume 25 (November/December 2005 through September/October 2006),
volume 26 (November/December 2006 through September/October 2007),
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Texas Gardener’s Seeds is published weekly. © Suntex Communications, Inc. 2012. All rights reserved. You may forward this publication to your friends and colleagues if it is sent in its entirety. No individual part of this newsletter may be reproduced in any manner without prior written permission from the publisher.

Missed an issue? Back issues of Texas Gardener’s Seeds are available at www.texasgardener.com/newsletters.

Publisher: Chris S. Corby ● Editor: Michael Bracken

Texas Gardener’s Seeds, P.O. Box 9005, Waco, Texas 76714 ● www.TexasGardener.com