July 18, 2012

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Drought-killed trees could become liability issues for landowners

Texas Forest Service

A tree that falls in a lonely forest may not make a sound, but what about the tree that falls on your neighbor’s house?

The sound it makes? Cha-ching.

Texas Forest Service is encouraging homeowners and landowners to remove fire- and drought-killed trees that are within falling distance of neighboring homes, roads and pathways. Failure to do so, agency officials say, could make you liable for damages.

“Be aware that your tree could fall onto someone else’s property,” Texas Forest Service Central Texas Operations Department Head Jim Rooni said. “The rules vary from place to place, but generally the owner of the tree is responsible. Bottom line: You could be liable.”

Rooni said foresters received an influx of calls following the deadly wildfire that ripped through Bastrop last September, destroying roughly 1.5 million trees. But the liability issue isn’t limited to trees killed by fire, he said.

Texas is emerging from one of the most devastating droughts and one of the most unprecedented wildfire seasons in state history. Though there is no official count for the total number of trees killed by wildfire, foresters and analysts have estimated that as many as 500 million trees in rural forested areas and another 5.6 million trees in populated urban areas were killed as a result of the 2011 drought.

The sheer volume of dead trees — especially those standing in populated areas — poses a significant hazard, Rooni said.

“Standing, dead trees are dangerous and unpredictable,” Rooni said. “If they fall, they can cause serious damage — and even death.”

If your tree still has yet to sprout green leaves, forestry experts say it’s most likely dead. If you’re not sure, read our Texas Forest Service tree assessment guide, check out our facebook photo album to see examples of trees in varying states or contact a certified arborist.

If you have questions regarding liability on public land or rights of way, contact your local county sheriff’s department or county commissioner’s office. For questions regarding liability issues on private property, seek counsel from a reputable legal source.



Emma Taylor, Kilgore, plays in her parents’ woodlands. Even a woodland of only a few acres — or less — requires management to minimize the risk of wildfire, pests and forest diseases. (Texas AgriLife Extension Service photo by Dr. Eric Taylor)
Four-part program designed with urban woodlands owners in mind

By Robert Burns
Texas AgriLife Extension Service

Many people living in urban areas — Houston, Dallas and others — who own a little slice of woodland may think they don’t need to be concerned about managing for drought, wildfire, pests or forest diseases.

But healthy woodlands are no accident. They require work and planning, according to a forestry expert with the Texas AgriLife Extension Service.

“Whatever you call it, woodlands or forest, if you simply enjoy the beauty, wildlife, or recreational amenities, the health of the ecological system is important in order to resist drought, insects, disease, and even wildfire,” said Dr. Eric Taylor, AgriLife Extension forestry specialist, Overton. “And healthy woodlands require hands-on management from the landowner.”

To help property owners keep their woodlands healthy, Taylor and his associates are hosting a four-part seminar that can be attended in person or online.

The in-person course will be held at the Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Center at Overton, which is northeast of Tyler. Taylor encouraged all who can to attend the meeting at Overton because of the additional benefits gained from face-to-face meetings. For those who can’t make it in person, the course will be broadcast live as a webinar.

The recorded sessions will be made available online to registered participants.

Session dates will be Aug. 10, Sept. 14, Oct. 12, Nov. 9, which are the second Friday of each month. The sessions will last 1 - 5 p.m.

Registration for the course is $85, which may be paid online at the secure AgriLife Extension Conference Services site at https://agriliferegister.tamu.edu. Enter the keyword “woodland.”

Two relatively recent developments prompted him and his associate, Matt Bonham, to devise the course, Taylor said.

The first development was increased stress to woodlands from natural and/or man-made sources, Taylor said. Natural stressors include drought and extreme heat. Man-made stressors include invasive species, soil disturbances, air pollution and other stressors stemming from human activities.

All these stressors not only threaten the health of woodlands directly, but make them more susceptible to pests, plant diseases, drought, and wildfire.

“However, there is good news,” Taylor said. “These problems can be minimized or eliminated through the simple and purposeful act of sound woodland management.”

The four session titles are: A Healthy Woodland is No Accident; How Are My Woodlands in Danger? A deeper look at the threats and challenges facing today’s forests and woodlands; Recipe for Healthy Woods: A thorough look at strategies to promote ecosystem health and vigor; and Planning for Tomorrow, Today.

For those planning to attend via the webinar multicast, Taylor suggested they visit the configuration test site at http://go.ncsu.edu/configuration at least 24 hours in advance to test their accessibility.

For more information, contact Michele Sensing at 903-834-6191 or amsensing@ag.tamu.edu.


State set to invest in purifying brackish water for commercial sale in Central Texas

Texas General Land Office

Along Interstate 35, between Austin and San Antonio, the Texas Economic Miracle is thirsting for water. Tight restrictions on the Edwards Aquifer and the high costs of pipelines are choking off the potential growth of homes and businesses.

But on one 2,000-acre tract of land north of New Braunfels — still parched from last year’s drought — Texas Land Commissioner Jerry Patterson hopes he’s found the water needed to help end Central Texas’ water crisis.

As chairman of the School Land Board, which manages the real estate portfolio of the state’s $26 billion Permanent School Fund, Patterson is investigating the feasibility of tapping into Texas’ abundant brackish groundwater, desalinating it, and selling it.

“We don’t need to live one step away from crisis and drought,” Patterson said. “Texas may be short on water, but not innovation. Desal is part of Texas’ water future and we’re going to start right here.”

Patterson said the General Land Office has contracted with experts to study the hydrology and geology of several Permanent School Fund tracts of land along the I-35 corridor. “If the water is there, then I think the School Land Board is ready to invest the time and resources needed to deliver an entirely new and drought-resistant source of water for Central Texas,” Patterson said. “This is a game-changer, a commonsense fix for the Texas water crisis.”

The impact of developing a new source of water in Central Texas will be seen all the way downstream, Patterson said, potentially benefitting rice farmers, petrochemical facilities, utilities and even the health of the state’s bays and estuaries. “Adding desal to the mix would help mitigate the impact of a drought on the Highland Lakes,” Patterson said. “Desal in Central Texas would help all the way to the coast.”

Patterson said he hopes to develop a groundwater desalination model that could be replicated on other state-owned tracts of land all over Texas. “Texas has an abundance of brackish water,” Patterson said. “I hope to put the General Land Office in the water business statewide.”

The coming Texas water crisis was highlighted in Texas Monthly, which points out the importance of finding solutions now, before the state’s population doubles in the next 50 years.

After all, Patterson said, necessity really is the mother of invention. “We can’t plan on taking any more fresh water from the Edwards Aquifer. It takes 30 years to get a new lake permitted and filled. Pipelines cost a fortune,” Patterson said. “If we want to keep growing, we need water and I think desal is a common-sense part of that solution.”


Gardening tips

If your ground covers are getting a little ragged as late summer approaches, shear them back and provide a good soaking of water. English ivy, Asian jasmine and liriope are examples of ground covers that would benefit from a fresh “haircut.”

Have a favorite gardening tip you’d like to share? Texas Gardener’s Seeds is seeking brief gardening tips from Texas gardeners to use in future issues. If we publish your tip in Seeds, we will send you a free Texas Gardener 2012 Planning Guide & Calendar. Please send your tips of 50 words or less to the editor at: Gardening Tips.


Did you know...

That the fruit of the rare subterranean parasitic plant hydnora triceps smell and taste of coconut? Native to Africa, it grows on the roots of Euphorbia dregeana. Completely lacking in chlorophyll, it depends on its host for water and nutrients. The plant structure is composed of only specialized stems, buds, and haustoria lacking any leaf-like structures entirely. It spends its life underground and only emerges to flower.


Upcoming garden events.

If you would like your organization’s events included in "Upcoming Garden Events" or would like to make a change to a listed event, please contact us at Garden Events. To ensure inclusion in this column, please provide complete details at least three weeks prior to the event.

Austin: “How to Plan and Install Home Drip Irrigation” will be presented from 10 a.m. until noon, Thursday, July 19, at the Travis County AgriLife Extension Office, 1600 B Smith Rd., Austin. Conserve water and reduce water stress to potted plants, landscaping or vegetable garden by using a drip irrigation system. Learn about the two most common drip systems available and how to utilize one or the other or combination of the systems. Discover how to test the water pressure to determine the length of the run. Gain knowledge by watching how the pieces are assembled. Take away the knowledge necessary to create your own system. This seminar is free and open to the public. It is presented by the Travis County Master Gardeners, a volunteer arm of the Texas AgriLife Extension Service in Travis County, www.tcmastergardeners.org. For information, call 512-854-9600.

Nacogdoches: The SFA Gardens at Stephen F. Austin State University will host the monthly Theresa and Les Reeves Lecture Series at 7 p.m. Thursday, July 19, in the Agriculture Building, Room 110, at 1924 Wilson Drive. Long time Houston area horticulturist Linda Gay will present “Thoughts on Having Survived a Life in the Public Garden World.” Before retiring, Linda Gay served as Director of the 325 acre Mercer Arboretum in Humble for 11 years. Prior to that, she was Assistant Director for three years, Chief Horticulturist for four years, and Horticulturist for seven years. Linda has long been a proponent of gingers, bamboo, and other heat-tolerant tropical plants adapted to the coastal South. She can now be found working at the Arbor Gate Nursery in Tomball, Texas. The Theresa and Les Reeves Garden Lecture Series is normally held the third Thursday of each month at the Arthur Temple College of Forestry and Agriculture’s SFA Mast Arboretum. A rare plant raffle will be held after the program. The lecture is free and open to the public, but donations to the Theresa and Les Reeves lecture series endowed fund are always appreciated. For more information, call (936) 468-1832 or e-mail grantdamon@sfasu.edu.

San Antonio: The Bexar County Master Gardeners General Meeting, will be held July 19 at the Texas AgriLife Extension Conference Room, 3355 Cherry Ridge Dr., San Antonio. The evening begins with a social from 6 p.m. until 6:30 p.m., followed by brief meeting with Ken Murth speaking about Home Greenhouses. Ken has worked for Greenhouses Etc., manufacturing, erecting both commercial and residential greenhouse. He has worked closely with clients selecting, purchasing or updating their greenhouses. For additional information, contact Sandy Justice at sandy.justice@bexarcountymastergardeners.org.

Seguin: Applications are now being accepted for Guadalupe Master Gardener classes starting August 15 and continuing through December 5. Generally, classes will be held on Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. in Seguin. Interested individuals are invited to attend a free informational meeting to discuss the application procedure and requirements at 6 p.m. on Thursday, July 19, at the Master Gardeners-AgriLife Extension Office, 230 East Live Oak Street, Seguin. Following will be a free, one-hour presentation on Keeping Your Trees Alive by Mr. Jim Johnson, of the Texas Forest Service. For more information, call Jose Contreras at 830-401-0800 or email him at elmerojose@gmail.com.

Burnet: Master Gardener and Earth-Kind Specialist Sheryl Yantis will present a free Green Thumb Program on "Tips for a Successful Fall Garden" at the Burnet Herman Brown Free Library on the Town Square at 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, July 21. Be sure to visit the Burnet Farmer's Market on the Square before and after the program. This is a free Green Thumb Program presented by the Highland Lakes Master Gardeners in conjunction with Texas AgriLife Extension. For more information on the Green Thumb Programs go to www.yantislakesidegardens.com/greenthumb or call (325) 388-8849.

Ft. Worth: “Fall Vegetable Gardening” will be presented by Tarrant County Master Gardener Association, Saturday, July 21, 10 a.m.- noon, at Fort Worth’s Resource Connection, Building 2300 gym, on Circle Drive. The Resource Connection is located off Campus Dr, north from I-20. Class fee is $5. To register or for more information, contact Billie Hammack at 817-884-1296 or blhammack@ag.tamu.edu.

Houston: Urban Harvest will celebrate the quintessential summer refresher, the watermelon, with the first Watermelon Week at three of its farmers markets: Sunday, July 22, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Highland Village Farmers Market, 2720 Suffolk Street, behind JoS. A. Bank; Friday, July 27, 3 to 7 p.m. at HCC Farmers Market, 5601 West Loop South Freeway; Saturday, July 28, 8 a.m. to noon at Eastside Farmers Market, 3000 Richmond at Eastside. Events included at all markets will be Watermelon Variety Tastings, Watermelon Juicing Demo by Roots Juice; Watermelon Carving Demos and a Watermelon Seed-Spitting Contest. As always, there is free admission at the Farmers Market. The Urban Harvest Farmers Market at Highland Village is open every Sunday throughout the year and offers brunch items, locally-produced vegetables, fruits and farm products. The market supports family farms and boosts the local economy, and all items are grown or produced within 180 mile radius of downtown Houston. Vendors sell seasonal fruits and vegetables, yard eggs, duck eggs, goat cheeses, pasteurized goat milk, pastured chicken, pastured duck, grass-fed beef, honey, fair trade organic coffee, fresh cut flowers, fresh herbs, prepared foods and baked goods, healthy snacks, knife sharpening while you shop, and much more. Urban Harvest promotes healthy communities, sound nutrition and respect for the environment by educating children and adults and facilitating harvest and habitat gardens. For more information, visit www.urbanharvest.org.

Ft. Worth: Information on native and adapted ornamental grasses will be provided by the Tarrant County Master Gardener Association, Tuesday, July 24, 10 a.m. - noon, at Fort Worth’s Resource Connection, Building 2300, room 2351, on Circle Drive. The Resource Connection is located off Campus Dr, north from I-20. Class fee is $5. To register or for more information, contact Billie Hammack at 817-884-1296 or blhammack@ag.tamu.edu.

Ft. Worth: "Fall Vegetable Garden: The Best Season in Texas" will be presented from 1 p.m. until 5 p.m., August 4, in Lonestar Room A & B at the Tarrant County Plaza Building, 200 Taylor St., Ft. Worth. Registration is $15. Advance reservations are preferred, but not required. For more information or to enroll, call 817-884-1945.

Nacogdoches: An "Estate Planning and Taxation Workshop," designed for forest landowners, consulting foresters, accountants, attorneys, and others who work with forest landowners in matters pertaining to estate planning and timber taxes, will be presented by Dr. Robert Tufts, an attorney and associate professor in the School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences at Auburn University, from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m., Friday, August 10 in Room 117, Arthur Temple College of Forestry & Agriculture at Stephen F. Austin State University, East College at Raguet Street, Nacogdoches. Registration, which includes lunch and workbook: $35. For additional information, call the Texas Forestry Association at 936-632-8733.

Nacogdoches: Want to learn all the in’s and out’s of raising broilers in the backyard for what amounts to chicken feed? If so, at $20 the Small Flock and Vegetable Short Course, set Aug. 10 at the Texas AgriLife Extension Service office in Nacogdoches County, was made to order, said Aaron Low, AgriLife Extension agent for Cherokee County. Unlike other courses, attendees will also be treated to several presentations on home vegetable gardening, including growing heritage varieties and raising vegetables for organic markets. The registration fee will include a catered lunch, educational materials and break refreshments. To register, RSVP by Aug. 3 by calling 936-560-7711. The AgriLife Extension office in Nacogdoches is located at 203 W. Main St. Morning presentations will include: “Raising Broilers in the Backyard,” Dr. Greg Archer, AgriLfe Extension poultry specialist, College Station; “Backyard Laying Hen Facilities and Nutrition Management,” Dr. Craig Coufal, AgriLfe Extension poultry specialist, College Station; “Small Flock Diseases, Treatments and Biosecurity,” Dr. Morgan Farnell, AgriLfe Extension poultry specialist, College Station; “Selling the Goods Produced by Your Backyard Flock-Regulations,” Coufal; and “Brown Eggs, White Eggs, Red Chickens, White Chickens, Checkered Chickens — What Breed Do I Buy?,” an Ideal Poultry Co. representative. After-lunch presentations will include “Ducks, Geese, Guineas or Turkeys — Why or Why Not?” Ideal Poultry representative; “Home Gardening — Soil, Irrigation and Size and Type of Garden,” Dr. Joseph Masabni, AgriLife Extension horticulture specialist, College Station; “Insect Control in Home Poultry Flock and the Home Garden,” Dr. Sonja Swiger, AgriLife Extension entomologist, Stephenville; and “Heritage Gardening, Selecting What to Grow, Selling produce and Organic vs. Non-organic vs. Mixture,” Masabni. The program is jointly hosted by AgriLife Extension offices in Angelina, Cherokee, Nacogdoches and Shelby counties.

Austin: “Rainwater Harvesting in a Thirsty World” will be presented from 10 a.m. until noon, Saturday, August 11, at Zilker Botanical Garden, Garden Center, 2220 Barton Springs Rd., Austin. Turn water scarcity into water abundance! New filtration and treatment technologies make rainwater harvesting relatively easy. Rainwater harvesting systems can be installed in existing buildings or incorporated into new construction. Master Gardener Ed Parken will discuss how to conceptualize, design, and implement sustainable water-harvesting systems for your home and landscape. Parking and seating are limited so please register online to reserve your seat at http://travis-tx.tamu.edu/horticulture and click on “Public Seminar Registration.” This seminar is free; Zilker park entrance fee is $2 per adult, $1 per child or senior. The seminar is presented by the Travis County Master Gardeners, a volunteer arm of the Texas AgriLife Extension Service in Travis County. www.tcmastergardeners.org. For information, call 512-854-9600.

La Marque: Long time Galveston County Master Gardener Luke Stripling will present a workshop on growing cool-weather vegetables in Galveston County, 9 - 11:30 a.m., August 11, at the Galveston County AgriLife Extension Office in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (FM 519), La Marque. Topics will include soil preparation, drainage, the use of raised beds, growing up using fence or other supports, the best seed planting dates, the best varieties, planting depth, fertilizer methods, water requirements, and harvesting. For course reservations, call 281-534-3413, ext. 12 or email GALV3@wt.net.

La Marque: Palm tree enthusiast and Galveston County Master Gardener O. J. Miller has more than 15 years experience with palms in our area and will lead “Culture and Care of Palms in Galveston County” 1-3 p.m., August 11, at the Galveston County AgriLife Extension Office in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (FM 519), La Marque. This program will include an introduction to palms, an overview of the exotics and commonly found palms at nurseries in our area, palm planting methods, palm fertilization, freeze preparation and proper care. The program will include a discussion on the better varieties of palms for Galveston County and the surrounding area. For course reservations, call 281-534-3413, ext. 12 or email GALV3@wt.net.

Houston: The August meeting of Houston Urban Gardeners (HUG) will be Monday, August 13, 6:30 p.m. at the Houston Garden Center in Hermann Park, 713-284-1989. Mary and Roger Demeny will show us pictures of their extensive home garden and explain what to plant and do now in our veggie gardens.

Austin: “Planting the Fall Vegetable Garden” will be presented from 10 a.m. until noon, Thursday, August 16, at the Travis County AgriLife Extension Office, 1600 B Smith Rd., Austin. In spite of the warm temperatures, it is time to prepare for the fall vegetable garden. Discover which warm-season vegetables can be replanted now and which vegetables thrive in our mild winter temperatures. Learn the basics of soil preparation, how to plant seeds and transplants. Learn the varieties recommended for this area and the ideal times for planting. Novice and experienced gardeners will learn valuable information. This seminar is free and open to the public. It is presented by the Travis County Master Gardeners, a volunteer arm of the Texas AgriLife Extension Service in Travis County, www.tcmastergardeners.org. For information, call 512-854-9600.

La Marque: Since fall is the ideal time to plant onions and garlic, Sam Scarcella, Galveston County Master Gardener since 1986, will be presenting a program on what you need to know to grow your own onions and garlic, 9-11 a.m., August 25, at the Galveston County AgriLife Extension Office in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (FM 519), La Marque For course reservations, call 281-534-3413, ext. 12 or email GALV3@wt.net.

La Marque: “I would like to grow roses, but they have so many problems” is a common statement by local gardeners. From 1 until 3:30 p.m., August 25, Anna Wygryss program introduces you to roses that do not need pampering, at the Galveston County AgriLife Extension Office in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (FM 519), La Marque. What’s old is new again. EarthKind Gardening has re-introduced gardeners to “Old Garden Roses, Our Ageless Beauties.” For course reservations, call 281-534-3413, ext. 12 or email GALV3@wt.net.

San Antonio: Texas AgriLife Extension Service provides an opportunity for children 8-13 in age to learn about gardening by growing their own vegetables through the mentoring of Bexar County Master Gardener volunteers. Each child is allotted a 3.5’ x 28’ plot at the beautiful San Antonio Botanical Garden. Children will have fun growing different types of seeds, herbs, vegetables, and ornamental annual flowers. Weekly educational gardening presentations will stimulate these young minds. The children will also participate in fun, hands-on Junior Master Gardener activities. The fall session will be conducted every Saturday, starting August 25 and concluding on December 8. For more information, contact Angel Torres at (210) 467-6575 or matorres@ag.tamu.edu. Download the application at: http://bexar-tx.tamu.edu/files/2011/12/Application-Childrens-Vegetable-Garden.pdf.

Ft. Worth: "Native & Adapted Plants" will be presented from 10 a.m. until noon, September 1, in Lonestar Room A & B at the Tarrant County Plaza Building, 200 Taylor St., Ft. Worth. Registration is $15. Advance reservations are preferred, but not required. For more information or to enroll, call 817-884-1945.

Ft. Worth: "Landscape Design" will be presented from 1 p.m. until 5 p.m., November 3, in Lonestar Room A & B at the Tarrant County Plaza Building, 200 Taylor St., Ft. Worth. Registration is $15. Advance reservations are preferred, but not required. For more information or to enroll, call 817-884-1945.

Ft. Worth: "Individual Consultations" will be available from 10 a.m. until noon, December 1, in Lonestar Room A & B at the Tarrant County Plaza Building, 200 Taylor St., Ft. Worth. Registration is $15. Advance reservations are preferred, but not required. For more information or to enroll, call 817-884-1945.

MONTHLY MEETINGS

Houston: The Harris County Master Gardeners meet at noon the first Tuesday of each month at the Texas AgriLife Extension, 3033 Bear Creek Drive (near the intersection of Highway 6 and Patterson Road), Houston. For additional information visit http://hcmga.tamu.edu or call 281-855-5600.

Wichita Falls: The Wichita County Master Gardener Association meets at 5:30 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 600 Scott Street, Wichita Falls, on the first Tuesday of each month. For more information, visit http://www.overthegardengate.org or call 940-716-8610.

Kilgore: Northeast Texas Organic Gardeners meets at 1 p.m. on the first Wednesday of each month. For more information, call Carole Ramke at 903-986-9475.

Allen: The Allen Garden Club meets at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month, February through December, at the Allen Heritage Center, 100 E. Main St., Allen. For more information, visit www.allengardenclub.org.

Brownwood: The Brown County Master Gardeners Association meets the first Thursday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 605 Fisk Ave., Brownwood. For further information, call Mary Green Engle at 325-784-8453.

Gonzalas: Gonzales Master Gardeners Association holds their monthly meeting on the first Thursday of each month. A short program is presented. The meeting is held from noon until 1 p.m. at 1405 Conway St. (Odd Fellows Lodge). Bring a bag lunch, drinks provided. Contact AgriLife Extension Office at 830-672-8531 or e-mail gonzales@ag.tamu.edu for more information.

Austin: Austin Organic Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. on the second Monday of each month at the Zilker Botanical Gardens in Austin. For more information, visit www.main.org/aog.

Evant: The Evant Garden Club meets on the second Tuesday of each month at 10 a.m., usually at the bank in downtown Evant. To confirm the date, time and place of each month's meeting, call 254-471-5585.

Marion: The Guadalupe County (Schertz/Seguin) Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets on the second Tuesday of each month except July and August at The Library, 500 Bulldog, Marion. There is a plant exchange and meet-and-greet begins at 6:30 p.m. followed by the program at 7 p.m. Visitors are welcome. For more information or an application to join NPSOT visit www.npsot.org/GuadalupeCounty/ or contact guadalupecounty@npsot.org.

Jacksboro: The Jacksboro Garden Club meets at 9:30 a.m. the second Wednesday of each month (except June, July and August) at the Concerned Citizens Center, 400 East Pine Street, Jacksboro. For more information, call Melinda at 940-567-6218.

Longview: The Gregg County Master Gardeners Association meets the second Wednesday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 405 E. Marshall Ave., Longview. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program preceding the business meeting. For further information call Cindy Gill at 903-236-8429 or visit www.gregg-tx.tamu.edu.

Rockport: The Rockport Herb & Rose Study Group, founded in March 2003, meets the second Wednesday of each month at 10 a.m. at 619 N. Live Oak Street, Room 14, Rockport, to discuss all aspects of using and growing herbs, including historical uses and tips for successful propagation and cultivation. Sometimes they take field trips and have cooking demonstrations in different locations. For more information, contact Linda 361-729-6037, Ruth 361-729-8923 or Cindy 979-562-2153 or visit www.rockportherbs.org and http://rockportherbies.blogspot.com.

Beaumont: The Jefferson County Master Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the AgriLife Extension Office, 1225 Pearl Street, Suite 200, Beaumont. For more information, call 409-835-8461.

Brownwood: Brown County Master Gardeners Association meets the second Thursday of each month, from Noon to 1 p.m., at the Brown County AgriLife Extension Office, 605 Fisk, Brownwood. For additional information, call Freda Day 325-643-1077, or Mary Engle 325-784-8453.

Georgetown: The Williamson County Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the Georgetown Public Library, 402 W. 8th Street. Georgetown. For additional information, contract Billye Adams at 512-863-9636 or visit http://www.npsot.org/WilliamsonCounty/default.htm.

Orange: The Orange County Master Gardeners Association holds their monthly meeting on the second Thursday of each month. A short program is presented. The meeting starts at 6:30 p.m. at the Salvation Army Bldg. cor. MLK & Strickland in Orange. Pot luck supper at 6 p.m. Visit http://txmg.org/orange for more information.

San Antonio: The San Antonio Herb Society meets at 7 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month at the San Antonio Garden Center, 3310 N. New Braunfels (corner of Funston & N. New Braunfels). For more information on programs, visit www.sanantonioherbs.org.

Angleton: The Brazoria County Master Gardeners meet at 11 a.m. on the second Friday of each month at the Brazoria County Extension Office, 21017 County Road 171, Angleton. There is a general business meeting followed by a brief educational program each month. For further information call 979-864-1558, ext.110.

College Station: The A&M Garden Club meets on the second Friday of each month during the school year at 9:30 am at the Peace Lutheran Church, 2201 Rio Grande, College Station. Expert speakers, plant sharing, and federated club projects help members learn about gardening in the Brazos Valley, floral design, conservation, and more. For more information, visit http://www.amgardenclub.com/.

Houston: The Spring Branch African Violet Club meets the second Saturday of each month, January through November, at 10:30am at the Copperfield Baptist Church, 8350 Highway 6 North, Houston. Call Karla at 281-748-8417 prior to attending to confirm meeting date and time.

Dallas: The Rainbow Garden Club of North Texas meets the second Sunday of each month at 2 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Meetings are held at member’s homes and garden centers around the area. For more information, visit www.RainbowGardenClub.com.

Arlington: The Arlington Men's Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the third Monday of each month (except December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact Lance Jepson at LJepson@aol.com.

Cleburne: The Johnson County Master Gardeners meet at 2 p.m. on the third Monday of each month at McGregor House, 1628 W. Henderson, Cleburne, which includes a program and a meet & greet. For more information, call Sharon Smith at 817-894-7700.

Rockport: Monthly meetings of the Aransas/San Patricio Master Gardeners are held at 10 a.m. on the third Tuesday of each month at Texas AgriLife Extension Service - Aransas County Office, 892 Airport Rd., Rockport. For additional information, e-mail aransas-tx@tamu.edu or call 361-790-0103.

Sugar Land: The Sugar Land Garden Club meets on the third Tuesday of each month, September through November and January through April at 10 a.m. at the Sugar Land Community Center, 226 Matlage Way, Sugar Land. The club hosts a different speaker each month. For more information, visit www.sugarlandgardenclub.org.

Denton: The Denton Organic Society, a group devoted to sharing information and educating the public regarding organic principles, meets the third Wednesday of each month (except July, August and December) at the Denton Senior Center, 509 N. Bell Avenue. Meetings are free and open to the public. Meetings begin at 7 p.m. and are preceded by a social at 6:30. For more information, call 940-382-8551.

Glen Rose: The Somervell County Master Gardeners meet at 10 a.m., the third Wednesday of each month at the Somervell County AgriLife Extension office, 1405 Texas Drive, Glen Rose. Visitors are welcome. For more information, call 254-897-2809 or visit www.somervellmastergardeners.org.

Granbury: The Lake Granbury Master Gardeners meet at 1 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at the Hood County Annex 1, 1410 West Pearl Street, Granbury. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program each month preceding the business meeting. For information on topics call 817-579-3280 or visit http://www.hoodcountymastergardeners.org/.

Seabrook: The Harris County Precinct 2 Master Gardeners hold an educational program at 10 a.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at The Meeting Room at Clear Lake Park (on the Lakeside), 5001 NASA Road 1, Seabrook. The programs are free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu.

Houston: The Native Plant Society of Texas — Houston (NPSOT-H) meets at 7 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except for October (4th Thursday) and December (2nd Thursday). Location varies. For locations, for more information on programs, and for information about native plants for Houston, visit http://www.npsot.org/Houston.

Rosenberg: The Fort Bend Master Gardeners meet at 7:00 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except December at the Bud O’Shieles Community Center located at 1330 Band Road, Rosenberg. For more information, call 281-341-7068 or visit www.fbmg.com.

Seguin: The Guadalupe County Master Gardeners meets at 7 p.m. the third Thursday of each month, except December, at the Texas AgriLife Extension Bldg. at 210 E. Live Oak, Seguin. An educational program precedes the business meeting. The public is invited to attend. For topic or other information, call 830-379-1972 or visit www.guadalupecountymastergardeners.org.

New Braunfels: The Comal Master Gardeners meet at 6 p.m. the fourth Monday of each month at the GVTC Auditorium, 36101 FM 3159, New Braunfels. For additional information, call 830-620-3440.

Atlanta: The Caddo Wildflower Chapter of Native Plants Society meets the fourth Tuesday of each month at the Horne Enterprise building in Atlanta at 7 p.m. Visitors are welcome. For additional information, contact Kay Lowery at frostkay268@aol.com.

Brackenridge Park: The Native Plant Society San Antonio Chapter meets every fourth Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. in the Lions Field Adult and Senior Center, 2809 Broadway at E. Mulberry, Brackenridge Park, except August and December. Social and seed/plant exchange at 6:30 p.m. Free and open to the public. For more information, contact Bea at 210-999-7292 or visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio.

Bryan: The Brazos County Master Gardeners, a program of Texas AgriLife Extension, meet the fourth Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. at the Brazos Center, 3232 Briarcrest Drive, Bryan. There is a public gardening program at each meeting and pertinent information may be found at brazosmg.com or 979-823-0129.

Edna: The Jackson County Master Gardeners present their "Come Grown With Us" seminars on the fourth Tuesday of each month, January through October, beginning at 7 p.m. at 411 N. Wells, Edna. The seminars are free, open to the public and offer 2 CEU hours to Master Gardeners or others requiring them. For additional information, contact the Jackson County Extension Office at 361-782-3312.

Fort Worth: The Organic Garden Club of Forth Worth meets at 7 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday of each month except July and December at the Fort Worth Botanic Gardens main building. Refreshments are served. For more information, call 817-263-9322 or visit www.ogcfw.webs.com.

San Antonio: The Native Plant Society of Texas San Antonio Chapter meets the fourth Tuesday of each month, except August and December, at the Lions Field Adult & Senior Center, 2809 Broadway, San Antonio. Social and plant/seed exchange at 6:30 p.m., program at 7:00 p.m. For more information, visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio or call Bea at 210-999-7292.

Houston: The Houston Chapter of the Native Prairie Association of Texas (HNPAT) meets from 7 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. the fourth Wednesday of each month at Bayland Park Community Center, 6400 Bissonnet, Houston. For more information, contact hnpat@prairies.org.

Leander: The Leander Garden Club meets on the fourth Thursday of each month (except July and August) at 10:30 a.m. at the community room behind the Greater Texas Federal Credit Union,1300 N. Bell, Cedar Park, unless there is special event planned. Following a program and short business meeting, we share a pot-luck luncheon. To confirm the meeting place and time, please call president Cathy Clark-Ramsey at 512-963-4698 or email info@leandergc.org

Dallas: The Greater Dallas Organic Garden Club meets at 7:00 p.m. on the fourth Thurday of each month at the REI, 4515 LBJ Freeway, Dallas. For more information, call 214-824-2448 or visit www.gdogc.org.

Arlington: The Arlington Organic Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the last Thursday of each month (except November and December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact David at 817-483-7746.


Texas Fruit and Vegetable Gardening

By Greg Grant

This new book incorporates Greg’s horticultural expertise along with his homespun writing style and, unlike other books on vegetable gardening, this one includes chapters on fruit, nuts and herbs along with a nice selection of family recipes.

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In Greg's Garden:
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An intimate and personal exploration of the life of one of Texas’s most beloved gardeners, In Greg’s Garden: A Pineywoods Perspective on Gardening, Nature and Family gathers in a single volume the first nine years of Greg Grant’s columns from Texas Gardener magazine.

Revised and updated from their original publication, these 54 essays reveal the heart and soul of a seventh generation native Texan who has devoted his entire life to gardening, nature and family. With degrees in floriculture and horticulture from Texas A&M University and extensive hands-on experience as a horticulturist with the Texas Agricultural Extension Service, Stephen F. Austin State University, Mercer Arboretum and San Antonio Botanical Gardens, Grant has successfully introduced dozens of plants to the Texas nursery industry, all while maintaining long-held family property and renovating the homes of his ancestors in Arcadia, Texas.

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Wish you'd saved them?

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volume 24 (November/December 2004 through September/October 2005),
volume 25 (November/December 2005 through September/October 2006),
volume 26 (November/December 2006 through September/October 2007),
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Texas Gardener’s Seeds is published weekly. © Suntex Communications, Inc. 2012. All rights reserved. You may forward this publication to your friends and colleagues if it is sent in its entirety. No individual part of this newsletter may be reproduced in any manner without prior written permission from the publisher.

Missed an issue? Back issues of Texas Gardener’s Seeds are available at www.texasgardener.com/newsletters.

Publisher: Chris S. Corby ● Editor: Michael Bracken

Texas Gardener’s Seeds, P.O. Box 9005, Waco, Texas 76714 ● www.TexasGardener.com