November 14, 2012

Welcome to Texas Gardener’s Seeds, the weekly newsletter for Texas gardeners. Please do not reply to this e-mail because the sending address is not monitored. See the bottom of this newsletter for information on how to subscribe, unsubscribe, or contact the editor.


 

Oncor offers unique Texas Star bur oaks to customers through Arbor Day program

Texas A&M Forest Service

Thousands of unique Texas Star bur oak trees, a product of the Texas A&M Forest Service Urban Tree Improvement Program, soon will be dotting the state’s landscape in an effort to conserve energy, reduce carbon dioxide emissions and improve storm water management.

Texas Star bur oaks are acorn-bearing trees tailored to Texas, selected from genetic families proven to perform well in the state’s tough climate. They can reach heights of more than 80 feet and have heavy branches that form an open, spreading crown of dark green foliage.

Geneticist Tom Byram said the Texas Star bur oaks were hand-picked for an Arbor Day Foundation energy saving program because of their durability.

“Initially, native trees growing in urban environments were identified,” he said. “We collected acorns from these trees and planted them in replicated field trials at multiple locations. Outstanding selections from the best families in these field evaluations were grafted into orchards and managed for acorn production.”

Oncor, a Texas-based electricity provider, is sponsoring the donation of 12,000 Texas Star bur oaks to its customers through the Arbor Day Foundation’s Energy-Saving Trees program, which promotes conserving energy and reducing household electricity bills through strategic tree planting.

“We’re excited about Oncor’s involvement in this program,” said Gretchen Riley, Tree Line USA coordinator for Texas A&M Forest Service. “Not only do their customers have the opportunity to receive free trees specifically selected for the urban environment, but Texans as a whole will reap the benefits of trees planted through this program.”

Customers can reserve up to two trees per household at arborday.org/oncor. An online tool allows users to find the most strategic location to plant their tree and estimates the resulting energy savings. The 12,000 trees are estimated to yield more than $2 million in energy savings within 20 years as well as other benefits, including cleaner air, reduced carbon dioxide emissions and improved storm water management.

Find out more about the Energy-Saving Trees Program by visiting the Arbor Day Foundation website.



Alyssa Hurst, of Priddy Elementary in Hurst, grew a humongous cabbage and was named the state winner of the National Bonnie Plants Cabbage Program. (Photo courtesy of Bonnie Plants)
Cashing in on cabbage

Bonnie Plants

Kids across America are growing, and some are earning, a lot of “green” participating in the National Bonnie Plants Cabbage Program. This year, more than 1.5 million third graders in 48 states have gotten hands-on gardening experience growing colossal cabbages with high hopes to win “best in state” and receive a $1,000 scholarship towards education from Bonnie Plants.

Alyssa Hurst, of Priddy Elementary in Hurst, grew a humongous cabbage and was selected by Todd Staples, Commissioner of the Texas Department of Agriculture, as the state winner of the National Bonnie Plants Cabbage Program. Alyssa will receive a $1,000 saving bond towards education from Bonnie Plants.

Each year Bonnie Plants, the largest producer of vegetable and herb plants in North America, with 72 stations across the country, trucks free O.S. Cross, or "oversized," cabbage plants to third grade classrooms whose teachers have signed up for the program online at www.bonnieplants.com. If nurtured and cared for, kids can grow green, giant cabbages, some tipping the scales at 40 pounds!

Launched nationally in 2002, the program awards a $1,000 scholarship to one student in each participating state. At the end of the season, teachers from each class select the student who has grown the “best” cabbage, based on size and appearance. A digital image of the cabbage and student is submitted online at www.bonnieplants.com. That student's name is then entered in a statewide drawing. State winners are randomly selected by the Commission of Agriculture, in each of 48 participating states.

“The Bonnie Plants Cabbage Program is a wonderful way to engage children’s interest in agriculture, while teaching them not only the basics of gardening, but the importance of our food systems and growing our own,” said Stan Cope, President of Bonnie Plants. This unique, innovative program exposes children to agriculture and demonstrates, through hands-on experience, where food comes from. The program also affords our youth with some valuable life lessons in nurture, nature, responsibility, self-confidence and accomplishment.”

“Over the course of the past 10 years, the Bonnie Plants Cabbage Program has proved to be an exciting, worth-while experience that children, teacher, parents and grandparents across the country have embraced. We're pleased and proud to provide our youth with this enjoyable and enriching opportunity and engage their interest in the art and joy of gardening,” said Cope.

Getting It Growing

Growing a colossal cabbage may seem like a giant undertaking for little kids, but it’s easier than you think. All you need to do is:

  • Let the Sunshine In: Cabbages need at least six hours of full sunlight, more if possible.
  • Survey Your Space: Bonnie O.S. cabbages need at least three feet on each side to spread out. If you don’t have that much space, use a large container.
  • Supplement Soil: Work some compost into the soil — cabbages love nutrient-rich soil.
  • Feed the Need: Start your cabbage off right with an all-purpose vegetable fertilizer, then fertilize it every 10 days to keep it growing strong.
  • Water Wisely: Your cabbage needs at least one inch of rainfall each week. If it doesn’t rain, use a watering can or garden hose to gently water your plant at soil level.
  • Tend To Trouble: Keep weeds out of the cabbage patch — they compete for the food and water your cabbage needs. Be on the lookout for brown or white moths — these come from worms that love to munch on cabbage. If you see any, get rid of them right away. Cold weather can damage your cabbage. If the weather gets below 32° F, cover your cabbage with a bucket or clothe covering.
  • Hefty Harvest: In just 10 to 12 weeks, you should have a huge head of cabbage of which you can be proud.

Green thumbs and perseverance can pay off, providing participating children with a great sense of pride and accomplishment, a humongous cabbage, and for the lucky state winner…. the beginning of an educational fund for college. To see the 2012 winners and learn more about the 2013 contest, visit www.bonnieplants.com.

Why a cabbage? Cabbages were the first plant sold by Bonnie in 1918. The cabbages used for the 3rd grade program are OS Cross (over-sized), which is known for producing giant, oversized heads, making the process even more exciting for kids.

“It’s good for the students to get out there and grow their own plants,” according to Melody Witt, Principal, Alto Elementary Principal, “It helps them learn about nature, soil composition and the parts of plants, but it also shows them where things come from. So many young people take for granted the fact that we can walk into the store and buy whatever we want. It’s a good history lesson for them to learn that it wasn’t always like that, even in this country.”


Gardening tips

In most parts of the state, it is not too late to plant hardy, cool-season ornamentals like pansies, violas and ornamental cabbage. For an added, edible attraction to your ornamental beds try kale or Swiss chard.

Have a favorite gardening tip you’d like to share? Texas Gardener’s Seeds is seeking brief gardening tips from Texas gardeners to use in future issues. If we publish your tip in Seeds, we will send you a free Texas Gardener 2012 Planning Guide & Calendar. Please send your tips of 50 words or less to the editor at: Gardening Tips.


Did you know...

A potherb, or pot herb, was a term widely used in the 16th to 19th centuries to refer to any plant with stalks and leaves that could be boiled as greens or used in soups. It also was used to make a distinction between cooking herbs and medicinal herbs.


Upcoming garden events.

If you would like your organization’s events included in "Upcoming Garden Events" or would like to make a change to a listed event, please contact us at Garden Events. To ensure inclusion in this column, please provide complete details at least three weeks prior to the event.

NOVEMBER

Austin: “All About Bulbs” will be presented from 10 a.m. until noon, Thursday, November 15, at the Travis County AgriLife Extension Office, 1600 B Smith Rd., Austin. Learn all about bulbs, whether planting in the ground or forcing the bulbs to grow indoors. This class will include a discussion of reliable varieties for our conditions, methods to success, and requirements for indoor growing such as containers and media. This seminar is free and open to the public. It is presented by the Travis County Master Gardeners, a volunteer arm of the Texas AgriLife Extension Service in Travis County. For information, call 512-854-9600 or visit www.tcmastergardeners.org.

Nacogdoches: Linda Lehmusvirta, longtime producer of the “Central Texas Gardener” PBS show in Austin, will present “Bulbs for Psycho Lighting Gardeners” at the upcoming Theresa and Les Reeves Lecture Series hosted by the SFA Gardens. The lecture will take place at 7 p.m. Thursday, November 15, in Room 110 of the Agriculture Building located on Wilson Drive on the SFA campus. Lehmusvirta is producer, writer and editor of KLRU-TV’s “Central Texas Gardener.” The weekly show’s goal is to spare new gardeners mistakes and help them achieve beautiful, water-wise, organic and wildlife-friendly gardens. “Central Texas Gardener” is broadcast throughout the country and watched online by viewers around the world. Lehmusvirta has earned two writing awards from the Garden Writers of America, and the show has received several Lone Star Emmy awards. Her garden articles have been published in Garden Design, Organic Gardening, Neil Sperry’s Gardens, Austin Home & Living, Texas Home & Living, the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center’s magazine Wildflower, and the Austin American-Statesman. “Central Texas Gardener” can be viewed online at klru.org/ctg, and gardeners can follow her blog about her east Austin garden and preview each week’s program at klru.org/ctg/blog. The show also is on Facebook at facebook.com/CentralTexasGardener. The Theresa and Les Reeves Lecture Series is normally held the third Thursday of each month at the Arthur Temple College of Forestry and Agriculture’s SFA Mast Arboretum. A rare plant raffle will be held after the program. The lecture is free and open to the public, but donations to the Therea and Les Reeves Lecture Series endowed fund always are appreciated. For more information, call 936-468-1832 or e-mail grantdamon@sfasu.edu.

Round Rock: The Round Rock Public Library will host a presentation on Fruit Trees for Central Texas from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Thursday, November 15, at the Round Rock Public Library, 216 E. Main Street, Round Rock. Trees are an important part of the landscape. They add value to our property, shade our homes from the Texas sun, provide habitat for our wildlife, and beauty throughout the year. But what if you could get all those things PLUS fruit? No matter how big or small your yard may be, there is a delicious fruit tree that can fit. Come learn about your options, how you can "customize" the tree to fit your needs, and how to care for it for many years of delicious production.

San Antonio: The Bexar County Master Gardeners will meet Thursday, November 15, at 3355 Cherry Ridge, Suite 208, San Antonio, beginning with the social hour at 6 p.m. The evening's key speaker will be Board Certified Entomologist Molly Keck, Integrated Pest Management Program Specialist with the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service in Bexar County. Molly's subject will be "Bed Bugs — All You Ever Wanted to Know."  For more information, contact Stan Winchester at 210-241-6017 or Lisa Nixon at lisa.nixon@bexarcountymastergardeners.org.

Nacogdoches: The Stephen F. Austin State University Pineywoods Native Plant Center will host a two-part garden seminar, “How to Identify and Attract Backyard Birds,” from 6:30 to 8 p.m. on Friday, November 16, and from 8 to 11 a.m. Saturday, November 17. Participants will enjoy a Friday evening lecture with Cliff Shackelford, ornithologist with Texas Parks and Wildlife, regarding identification of common local birds. On Saturday, Shackelford will lead a birding stroll through the plant center property and to the nearby Shackelford home to visit the family’s backyard made “for the birds.” Shackelford is a seventh-generation Texan and began bird watching at age 9. He holds both a bachelor’s degree and master’s degree in biology, with an emphasis in avian ecology, from SFA and has authored more than 60 publications on birds and birding. He is lead author of the book Hummingbirds of Texas (2005, Texas A&M University Press). Participants will meet for both sessions at the Pineywoods Native Plant Center, 2900 Raguet St. Comfortable walking shoes are binoculars are recommended. Cost is $20 for members of SFA Gardens Friends and $25 for non-members. To register, call the SFA Gardens Education Office at (936) 468-1832 or e-mail erodewald@sfasu.edu.

Austin: Jeff Ferris, Horticulturist at the Natural Gardener, ACC Instructor, and cofounder of Neighborhood Harvest Project (nhpnetwork.org), presents “Gardening for Bees (Bee a Better Gardener)” at 10 a.m., Saturday, November 17, at The Natural Gardener, 8648 Old Bee Caves Road, Austin. For additional information, call 512-288-6113 or visit www.naturalgardeneraustin.com.

La Marque: Master Gardener Anna Wygrys will present “A Garden for Butterflies,” from 9 a.m. until 11 a.m., Saturday, November 17 at Galveston County AgriLife Extension Office in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (FM 519), La Marque. Wygrys coauthored The Butterflies of Galveston County — What Every Gardener Needs to Know, a comprehensive, 36-page color publication that contains essential information about the 83 species of butterflies of Galveston County and the plants that nurture them. For course reservations, call 281-534-3413, ext. 12 or email email GALV3@wt.net.

La Marque: Green House specialist and Harris County Master Gardener, Sid Kapner will discuss “Green House Management,” from 1 p.m. until 3 p.m., Saturday, November 17, at Galveston County AgriLife Extension Office in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (FM 519), La Marque. Kapner will discuss the different structures that can be used for hobby and commercial greenhouses and what materials are needed Also covered will be the cooling, heating, water management, water injection of fertilizers and sanitation systems that can be utilized in Green Houses. For course reservations, call 281-534-3413, ext. 12 or email GALV3@wt.net.

San Antonio: Green Spaces Alliance of South Texas will host a "Garden Design & Maintenance Workshop" at 9 a.m., November 17, at River Road Community Garden, San Antonio. For additional information, call 210-222-8430.

Austin: Expert Dwight Littleton will present “The Joy of Terrariums,” demonstrating how to plant a beautiful terrarium and how set it up to be maintenance-free at 2 p.m., November 18, at It’s About Thyme Garden Center, 11726 Manchaca, Austin. For more information, call 280-1192 or visit www.itsaboutthyme.com.

San Antonio: Loris Garrett from Cypress will present "Health Care in the Garden" for daylilies along with a virtual tour of his garden called "Benvenuti." at the 2 p.m., November 18 meeting of The San Antonio Daylily Society in the Education Building at the San Antonio Botanical Gardens. Free of charge.

Houston: Harris County Master Gardeners at Precinct 2 open their working and demonstration gardens and answer gardening questions from 8:30 a.m. until 11 a.m., Monday, November 19, at the Genoa Friendship Garden, 1202 Genoa Red Bluff Rd., Houston. This event is free and open to the public.

San Antonio: Learn how to create a Japanese Garden using Texas Plants at the Essentials of Gardening class presented by Gardening Volunteers of South Texas from noon until 3 p.m., Monday, November 19, at the San Antonio Garden Center. 3310 N. New Braunfels, San Antonio. The talk will be presented by landscape designer Mike Pecen. Following this talk, Robert ‘Bob’ Beyer from Austin will discuss Fresh Color for Winter Landscapes.” For additional information, visit www.GardeningVolunteers.org.

New Braunfels: Judy Barrett, editor of Homegrown, speaker, author, herb and gardening expert, presents "What Can I Do With My Herbs?" from 3 p.m. until 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, November 28, at the New Braunfels Public Library, 700 E. Common Street, New Braunfels. Using examples from her book, Barrett tells how to grow healthy herbs, provides a little of their history and gives creative, practical uses for them as well. Barrett will have copies of her book to sell and sign. This presentation, part of a monthly Library Gardening Series, co-sponsored by the Library and Comal County Master Gardeners, is free and open to anyone with interest in herbs and gardening. No pre-registration needed. For additional information, call 830-964-4494.

DECEMBER

Ft. Worth: "Individual Consultations" will be available from 10 a.m. until noon, December 1, in Lonestar Room A & B at the Tarrant County Plaza Building, 200 Taylor St., Ft. Worth. Registration is $15. Advance reservations are preferred, but not required. For more information or to enroll, call 817-884-1945.

Austin: Jane Tillman (Travis Audubon Society) will offer plant choices and other tips to make your yard more attractive to Austin’s birds when she leads “Cultivate Your Backyard Birds,” at 2 p.m., December 2, at It’s About Thyme Garden Center. 11726 Manchaca, Austin. Tillman was recently recognized as the National Volunteer of the Year by the National Wildlife Federation for her work creating wildlife habitats. Free. For more information, call 280-1192 or visit www.itsaboutthyme.com.

Humble: Mercer volunteer Sherry Cruse surprises and inspires participants with selections of plant materials and containers that bring color and style indoors during the winter months during her presentation about “Decorating for the holidays” from noon until 2 p.m., Wednesday, December 12, at the Mercer Arboretum & Botanic Gardens, 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble. For more information, call 281-443-8731, or visit www.hcp4.net/mercer.

Humble: Join avid birders and novices from 8 a.m. until noon, Saturday, December 15, at the Mercer Arboretum & Botanic Gardens, 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble, as you take part in Christmas Bird Count, an annual national event sanctioned by the Audubon Society, Houston is on a major flyway for migrating species and this is a great way to see some amazing birds as they head south or spend their winters in Mercer’s gardens. For more information, contact Al Barr at albbarr@comcast.net or call 281-443-8731.

MONTHLY MEETINGS

FIRST WEEK

Houston: The Harris County Master Gardeners meet at noon the first Tuesday of each month at the Texas AgriLife Extension, 3033 Bear Creek Drive (near the intersection of Highway 6 and Patterson Road), Houston. For additional information visit http://hcmga.tamu.edu or call 281-855-5600.

Wichita Falls: The Wichita County Master Gardener Association meets at 5:30 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 600 Scott Street, Wichita Falls, on the first Tuesday of each month. For more information, visit www.txmg.org/wichita or call 940-716-8610.

Kilgore: Northeast Texas Organic Gardeners meets at 1 p.m. on the first Wednesday of each month. For more information, call Carole Ramke at 903-986-9475.

Allen: The Allen Garden Club meets at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month, February through December, at the Allen Heritage Center, 100 E. Main St., Allen. For more information, visit www.allengardenclub.org.

Brownwood: The Brown County Master Gardeners Association meets the first Thursday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 605 Fisk Ave., Brownwood. For further information, call Mary Green Engle at 325-784-8453.

Gonzalas: Gonzales Master Gardeners Association holds their monthly meeting on the first Thursday of each month. A short program is presented. The meeting is held from noon until 1 p.m. at 1405 Conway St. (Odd Fellows Lodge). Bring a bag lunch, drinks provided. Contact AgriLife Extension Office at 830-672-8531 or e-mail gonzales@ag.tamu.edu for more information.

SECOND WEEK

Austin: Austin Organic Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. on the second Monday of each month at the Zilker Botanical Gardens in Austin. For more information, visit www.main.org/aog.

Evant: The Evant Garden Club meets on the second Tuesday of each month at 10 a.m., usually at the bank in downtown Evant. To confirm the date, time and place of each month's meeting, call 254-471-5585.

Marion: The Guadalupe County (Schertz/Seguin) Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets on the second Tuesday of each month except July and August at The Library, 500 Bulldog, Marion. There is a plant exchange and meet-and-greet begins at 6:30 p.m. followed by the program at 7 p.m. Visitors are welcome. For more information or an application to join NPSOT visit www.npsot.org/GuadalupeCounty/ or contact guadalupecounty@npsot.org.

Jacksboro: The Jacksboro Garden Club meets at 9:30 a.m. the second Wednesday of each month (except June, July and August) at the Concerned Citizens Center, 400 East Pine Street, Jacksboro. For more information, call Melinda at 940-567-6218.

Longview: The Gregg County Master Gardeners Association meets the second Wednesday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 405 E. Marshall Ave., Longview. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program preceding the business meeting. For further information call Cindy Gill at 903-236-8429 or visit www.gregg-tx.tamu.edu.

Rockport: The Rockport Herb & Rose Study Group, founded in March 2003, meets the second Wednesday of each month at 10 a.m. at 619 N. Live Oak Street, Room 14, Rockport, to discuss all aspects of using and growing herbs, including historical uses and tips for successful propagation and cultivation. Sometimes they take field trips and have cooking demonstrations in different locations. For more information, contact Linda 361-729-6037, Ruth 361-729-8923 or Cindy 979-562-2153 or visit www.rockportherbs.org and http://rockportherbies.blogspot.com.

Beaumont: The Jefferson County Master Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the AgriLife Extension Office, 1225 Pearl Street, Suite 200, Beaumont. For more information, call 409-835-8461.

Georgetown: The Williamson County Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the Georgetown Public Library, 402 W. 8th Street. Georgetown. For additional information, contract Billye Adams at 512-863-9636 or visit http://www.npsot.org/WilliamsonCounty/default.htm.

Orange: The Orange County Master Gardeners Association holds their monthly meeting on the second Thursday of each month. A short program is presented. The meeting starts at 6:30 p.m. at the Salvation Army Bldg. cor. MLK & Strickland in Orange. Pot luck supper at 6 p.m. Visit http://txmg.org/orange for more information.

San Antonio: The San Antonio Herb Society meets at 7 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month at the San Antonio Garden Center, 3310 N. New Braunfels (corner of Funston & N. New Braunfels). For more information on programs, visit www.sanantonioherbs.org.

Angleton: The Brazoria County Master Gardeners meet at 11 a.m. on the second Friday of each month at the Brazoria County Extension Office, 21017 County Road 171, Angleton. There is a general business meeting followed by a brief educational program each month. For further information call 979-864-1558, ext.110.

College Station: The A&M Garden Club meets on the second Friday of each month during the school year at 9:30 a.m. in the training room of the College Station Waste Water Facility building at the end of North Forest Parkway, College Station. Expert speakers, plant sharing, and federated club projects help members learn about gardening in the Brazos Valley, floral design, conservation, and more. For more information, visit http://www.amgardenclub.com/.

Houston: The Spring Branch African Violet Club meets the second Saturday of each month, January through November, at 10:30am at the Copperfield Baptist Church, 8350 Highway 6 North, Houston. Call Karla at 281-748-8417 prior to attending to confirm meeting date and time.

Dallas: The Rainbow Garden Club of North Texas meets the second Sunday of each month at 2 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Meetings are held at member’s homes and garden centers around the area. For more information, visit www.RainbowGardenClub.com.

THIRD WEEK

Arlington: The Arlington Men's Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the third Monday of each month (except December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact Lance Jepson at LJepson@aol.com.

Cleburne: The Johnson County Master Gardeners meet at 2 p.m. on the third Monday of each month at McGregor House, 1628 W. Henderson, Cleburne, which includes a program and a meet & greet. For more information, call Sharon Smith at 817-894-7700.

Rockport: Monthly meetings of the Aransas/San Patricio Master Gardeners are held at 10 a.m. on the third Tuesday of each month at Texas AgriLife Extension Service - Aransas County Office, 892 Airport Rd., Rockport. For additional information, e-mail aransas-tx@tamu.edu or call 361-790-0103.

Sugar Land: The Sugar Land Garden Club meets on the third Tuesday of each month, September through November and January through April at 10 a.m. at the Sugar Land Community Center, 226 Matlage Way, Sugar Land. The club hosts a different speaker each month. For more information, visit www.sugarlandgardenclub.org.

Denton: The Denton Organic Society, a group devoted to sharing information and educating the public regarding organic principles, meets the third Wednesday of each month (except July, August and December) at the Denton Senior Center, 509 N. Bell Avenue. Meetings are free and open to the public. Meetings begin at 7 p.m. and are preceded by a social at 6:30. For more information, call 940-382-8551.

Glen Rose: The Somervell County Master Gardeners meet at 10 a.m., the third Wednesday of each month at the Somervell County AgriLife Extension office, 1405 Texas Drive, Glen Rose. Visitors are welcome. For more information, call 254-897-2809 or visit www.somervellmastergardeners.org.

Granbury: The Lake Granbury Master Gardeners meet at 1 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at the Hood County Annex 1, 1410 West Pearl Street, Granbury. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program each month preceding the business meeting. For information on topics call 817-579-3280 or visit http://www.hoodcountymastergardeners.org/.

Seabrook: The Harris County Precinct 2 Master Gardeners hold an educational program at 10 a.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at The Meeting Room at Clear Lake Park (on the Lakeside), 5001 NASA Road 1, Seabrook. The programs are free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu.

Brownwood: Brownwood Garden Club meets the third Thursday of each month, 11:30 a.m.– 1 p.m.  The club meetings are at Southside Baptist Church, 1219 Indian Creek Road, with refreshments and a speaker presentation. Visitors are welcome. For more information, email boeblingen@centex.net or call 817-454-8175).

Houston: The Native Plant Society of Texas — Houston (NPSOT-H) meets at 7 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except for October (4th Thursday) and December (2nd Thursday). Location varies. For locations, for more information on programs, and for information about native plants for Houston, visit http://www.npsot.org/Houston.

Rosenberg: The Fort Bend Master Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except December at the Bud O’Shieles Community Center located at 1330 Band Road, Rosenberg. For more information, call 281-341-7068 or visit www.fbmg.com.

Seguin: The Guadalupe County Master Gardeners meets at 7 p.m. the third Thursday of each month, except June and December, at the Texas AgriLife Extension Bldg. at 210 E. Live Oak, Seguin. An educational program precedes the business meeting. The public is invited to attend. For topic or other information, call 830-379-1972 or visit www.guadalupecountymastergardeners.org.

FOURTH WEEK

New Braunfels: The Comal Master Gardeners meet at 6 p.m. the fourth Monday of each month at the GVTC Auditorium, 36101 FM 3159, New Braunfels. For additional information, call 830-620-3440.

Atlanta: The Caddo Wildflower Chapter of Native Plants Society meets the fourth Tuesday of each month at the Horne Enterprise building in Atlanta at 7 p.m. Visitors are welcome. For additional information, contact Gene Bobo at gene.bobo@agnet.tamu.edu.

Brackenridge Park: The Native Plant Society San Antonio Chapter meets every fourth Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. in the Lions Field Adult and Senior Center, 2809 Broadway at E. Mulberry, Brackenridge Park, except August and December. Social and seed/plant exchange at 6:30 p.m. Free and open to the public. For more information, contact Bea at 210-999-7292 or visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio.

Bryan: The Brazos County Master Gardeners, a program of Texas AgriLife Extension, meet the fourth Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. at the Brazos Center, 3232 Briarcrest Drive, Bryan. There is a public gardening program at each meeting and pertinent information may be found at brazosmg.com or 979-823-0129.

Edna: The Jackson County Master Gardeners present their "Come Grown With Us" seminars on the fourth Tuesday of each month, January through October, beginning at 7 p.m. at 411 N. Wells, Edna. The seminars are free, open to the public and offer 2 CEU hours to Master Gardeners or others requiring them. For additional information, contact the Jackson County Extension Office at 361-782-3312.

Fort Worth: The Organic Garden Club of Forth Worth meets at 7 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday of each month except July and December at the Deborah Beggs Moncrief Garden Center, 3220 Botanic Blvd., Ft. Worth. Refreshments are served. For more information, call 817-263-9322 or visit www.ogcfw.webs.com.

San Antonio: The Native Plant Society of Texas San Antonio Chapter meets the fourth Tuesday of each month, except August and December, at the Lions Field Adult & Senior Center, 2809 Broadway, San Antonio. Social and plant/seed exchange at 6:30 p.m., program at 7:00 p.m. For more information, visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio or call Bea at 210-999-7292.

Houston: The Houston Chapter of the Native Prairie Association of Texas (HNPAT) meets from 7 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. the fourth Wednesday of each month at Bayland Park Community Center, 6400 Bissonnet, Houston. For more information, contact hnpat@prairies.orgrg.

Leander: The Leander Garden Club meets on the fourth Thursday of each month (except July and August) at 10:30 a.m. at the community room behind the Greater Texas Federal Credit Union,1300 N. Bell, Cedar Park, unless there is special event planned. Following a program and short business meeting, we share a pot-luck luncheon. To confirm the meeting place and time, please call president Cathy Clark-Ramsey at 512-963-4698 or email info@leandergc.org.

Dallas: The Greater Dallas Organic Garden Club meets at 7:00 p.m. on the fourth Thurday of each month at the REI, 4515 LBJ Freeway, Dallas. For more information, call 214-824-2448 or visit www.gdogc.org.

Arlington: The Arlington Organic Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the last Thursday of each month (except November and December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact David at 817-483-7746.


Texas Fruit and Vegetable Gardening

By Greg Grant

This new book incorporates Greg’s horticultural expertise along with his homespun writing style and, unlike other books on vegetable gardening, this one includes chapters on fruit, nuts and herbs along with a nice selection of family recipes.

This easy-to-follow, color-packed guide features:

  • Planting, care and harvesting information for more than 60 edibles
  • Popular vegetable selections from arugula to tomatoes
  • A variety of common and unusual fruits and herbs
  • Advice on garden planning, creating the perfect soil, watering and more!
  • It is a must have for every serious gardener in Texas and neighboring states.

$29.79 (includes tax and shipping)

Call 1-800-727-9020 or visit us online at www.texasgardener.com to order your copy today!

American Express, Discover, MasterCard and Visa accepted.


The Texas Tomato Lover's Handbook

The best thing for tomato enthusiasts since the tomato itself! William D. Adams draws on more than thirty years' experience to provide a complete, step-by-step guide to success in the tomato patch. Learn everything from soil preparation, planting, feeding, caging and watering. Liberally sprinkled with the author's easy humor and illustrated with his own excellent photographs, the must have book has everything you'll need to assure a bumper crop! 189 pages. Lots of color photographs!

Only $26.69 for Seeds readers! Free shipping!

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American Express, Discover, MasterCard and Visa accepted.


In Greg's Garden:
A Pineywoods Perspective on Gardening, Nature and Family

An intimate and personal exploration of the life of one of Texas’s most beloved gardeners, In Greg’s Garden: A Pineywoods Perspective on Gardening, Nature and Family gathers in a single volume the first nine years of Greg Grant’s columns from Texas Gardener magazine.

Revised and updated from their original publication, these 54 essays reveal the heart and soul of a seventh generation native Texan who has devoted his entire life to gardening, nature and family. With degrees in floriculture and horticulture from Texas A&M University and extensive hands-on experience as a horticulturist with the Texas Agricultural Extension Service, Stephen F. Austin State University, Mercer Arboretum and San Antonio Botanical Gardens, Grant has successfully introduced dozens of plants to the Texas nursery industry, all while maintaining long-held family property and renovating the homes of his ancestors in Arcadia, Texas.

In Greg’s Garden: A Pineywoods Perspective on Gardening, Nature and Family is a must-read for every Texas gardener.

Available only for Kindle. Order directly from Amazon by clicking here.


Wish you'd saved them?

Are you missing an important issue of Texas Gardener? Or, perhaps, just tired of thumbing through stacks of back issues looking for the tips and techniques you need to make your garden grow? These new CDs provide easy access to all six issues of

volume 20 (November/December 2000 through September/October 2001),
volume 21
(November/December 2001 through September/October 2002),
volume 22
(November/December 2002 through September/October 2003),
volume 23
(November/December 2003 through September/October 2004),
volume 24 (November/December 2004 through September/October 2005),
volume 25 (November/December 2005 through September/October 2006),
volume 26 (November/December 2006 through September/October 2007),
volume 27 (November/December 2007 through September/October 2008),
volume 28 (November/December 2008 through September/October 2009),
volume 29 (November/December 2009 through September/October 2010),
volume 30 (November/December 2010 through September/October 2011) and
volume 31 (November/December 2011 through September/October 2012)*.

$16.99 per CD includes tax and shipping

Order by calling 1-800-727-9020.

(American Express, Discover, MasterCard and Visa accepted.)

*Other volumes will be available soon.


Fiber row cover valuable year-round

Grow-Web encourages plant growth and development, and also provides protection from insects, birds, diseases and frosts. It is also air and water permeable and allows for ventilation. Grow-Web provides excellent protection to seedlings when applied directly to the seedbed.

$31.88 per 12.3’ x 32.8’ roll (includes shipping!)

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(American Express, Discover, MasterCard and Visa accepted.)


Become a Texas Gardener fan on Facebook

Become a fan of Texas Gardener magazine on Facebook. See what we're up to at http://www.facebook.com/pages/Texas-Gardener-Magazine/301356291835?ref=nf.


Texas Gardener’s Seeds is published weekly. © Suntex Communications, Inc. 2012. All rights reserved. You may forward this publication to your friends and colleagues if it is sent in its entirety. No individual part of this newsletter may be reproduced in any manner without prior written permission from the publisher.

Missed an issue? Back issues of Texas Gardener’s Seeds are available at www.texasgardener.com/newsletters.

Publisher: Chris S. Corby ● Editor: Michael Bracken

Texas Gardener’s Seeds, P.O. Box 9005, Waco, Texas 76714 ● www.TexasGardener.com