November 28, 2012

Welcome to Texas Gardener’s Seeds, the weekly newsletter for Texas gardeners. Please do not reply to this e-mail because the sending address is not monitored. See the bottom of this newsletter for information on how to subscribe, unsubscribe, or contact the editor.


Two decades after collection, seeds to finally become trees in Bastrop

Texas A&M Forest Service

“For five years, the seeds sat — all 1,100 pounds of them — on the top shelf in the very back of a refrigerated Brookshire Bros. warehouse in Lufkin, Texas.

The drought-hardy loblolly pine seeds had been a focus of the Texas A&M Forest Service Western Gulf Forest Tree Improvement Program since its inception in 1951. But demand for the seeds declined over the decades, prompting geneticists to shelve the surplus indefinitely.

The seeds — 1,100 pounds of drought-hardy loblolly pine and 6,000 more of assorted varieties of the same species — had been stored so long, in fact, that in August 2011 geneticists began making plans to toss them into the landfill.

“This was supposed to be a temporary arrangement. We told them, ‘This won’t be forever,’ but it was beginning to look like it might be,” said Tom Byram, a geneticist with the agency’s tree improvement program. “What’s the use of having them if you’re not going to use them?”

That plan changed the following month when the most destructive wildfire in Texas history ravaged Bastrop County and its renowned Lost Pines ecosystem. The 32,400-acre inferno laid waste to the community, destroying 1,660 homes and killing 1.5 million trees.

“After the fire, it was immediately obvious we were going to be doing a restoration project of one kind or another — and we had the seed,” Byram said.

Tree experts in Texas, Louisiana and Oklahoma spent the next year nurturing the seeds, growing them into seedlings that could be used to reforest Bastrop State Park and surrounding private lands.

On Tuesday, Nov. 27, the first shipment — 200,000 loblolly pine seedlings grown by ArborGen, a commercial nursery based in East Texas — will arrive at Bastrop State Park. Another 200,000 seedlings grown by the Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry will be delivered Friday, Nov. 30.

Texas A&M Forest Service’s West Texas Nursery and the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center also grew seedlings — 25,000 and 30,000 respectively — that will be delivered as needed to support various reforestation projects throughout the planting season.

The first volunteer planting workday at Bastrop State Park is scheduled for Saturday, Dec. 1. Planting on private land begins Monday, Dec. 3.

A total of 550,000 seedlings will be planted in Bastrop over the next few months. Meanwhile, tree experts are continuing to grow seedlings with plans to plant 1.5 million next year and another million the year after that.

Costs will be covered by the Arbor Day Foundation, a non-profit organization that joined earlier this year with Texas A&M Forest Service and Texas Parks and Wildlife Department to launch the Lost Pines Forest Recovery Campaign, a reforestation fundraising effort.

Byram said there still was enough seed to produce about 14 million more loblolly pine seedlings, which will be more than enough to finish the project. But he warned that it could be 25 years before the 10-inch seedlings grow into the mighty pine trees that people associate with Bastrop’s Lost Pines.

“The function we have in restoration is to put the right genes back out there and then let Mother Nature sift through it. That’s the most anybody can do,” Byram said. “That’s our contribution. Mother Nature has to take the next step.”

For more information on the Lost Pines Forest Recovery Campaign or to donate or volunteer, visit www.arborday.org/texas.


The compost heap
Wayside missing?

"In this week's publication, the article on the dust bowl stated that the town of Wayside, Texas, is extinct," writes Deanna Sue Odvody. "When did this happen? I have cousins that live outside Wayside and go to church there. I wonder if they know the town has been declared extinct."

Wayside is a popular community name in Texas. There appear to be at least three defunct communities named Wayside — one each in Bastrop, Panola and Wood counties. There also appear to be at least three existing communities in Texas known as Wayside  — one each in Armstrong, Lynn and Roberts counties. Wayside in Armstrong County, which appears to be the community described in the article as "20 miles east of Happy," is an unincorporated town with a population, in 2000, of only 35. Learn more about the history of this Wayside from the Texas State Historical Association at http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/hnw26. With so many Texas communities named Wayside, it's easy to see how the article's author may have mistaken one for another.  — Michael Bracken, editor

"Thanks for the story on the Dust bowl," writes Barbara in Houston. "It is an important story. The same dust storms hit Phoenix, Arizona, several times this year. I read that in four hours 40 million tons of dust were dumped on Phoenix. Roads were impassable. I had a house in Tucson and dust got there, too. I had to have my air conditioner on the roof cleaned out so it would work properly." The dust storms are just beginning again."


Gardening tips

Don’t let those piles of leaves lay on your lawn all winter as they will weaken your grass. It is best to rake them up and use them as mulch in flower beds and vegetable garden or, better yet, run over them with a mulching mower and they will be cut up into small pieces that will sift down to the soil level and add valuable organic matter to your lawn.

Have a favorite gardening tip you’d like to share? Texas Gardener’s Seeds is seeking brief gardening tips from Texas gardeners to use in future issues. If we publish your tip in Seeds, we will send you a free Texas Gardener 2012 Planning Guide & Calendar. Please send your tips of 50 words or less to the editor at: Gardening Tips.


Did you know...

The Confederate rose Hibiscus mutabilis, while once a very popular plant throughout the South, is actually a native of south China. It is sometimes called the “cotton rose” because of its resemblance to a cotton plant. Ironically, cotton root rot can be a problem that affects Confederate rose if grown in alkaline soil where cotton has been grown previously. Source: Heirloom Gardening in the South by William C. Welch and Greg Grant.


Upcoming garden events.

If you would like your organization’s events included in "Upcoming Garden Events" or would like to make a change to a listed event, please contact us at Garden Events. To ensure inclusion in this column, please provide complete details at least three weeks prior to the event.

DECEMBER

La Marque: “Growing Tomatoes from Seed” will be presented from 9 a.m. until 11:30 p.m., December 1, at Galveston County AgriLife Extension Office in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (FM 519), La Marque. Learn all about growing tomatoes from seed from Galveston County Master Gardener Sam Scarcella. The program will include discussion topics on how to pick the best tomato varieties for the area, where to obtain seeds, planting and growing techniques, and insect and disease control. For course reservations, call 281-534-3413, ext. 12 or email GALV3@wt.net.

La Marque: “Fruit Tree Planting” will be presented from 1 p.m. until 2:30 p.m., December 1, at Galveston County AgriLife Extension Office in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (FM 519), La Marque. Galveston County Master Gardener Herman Auer will present a program on proper planting of container-grown fruit trees. Topics to be covered include fruit tree selection, rootstocks, chill hours, planting, and pruning back the planted tree. The program will also include a discussion and demonstration of the proper root pruning of container-grown trees. For course reservations, call 281-534-3413, ext. 12 or email GALV3@wt.net.

Ft. Worth: "Individual Consultations" will be available from 10 a.m. until noon, December 1, in Lonestar Room A & B at the Tarrant County Plaza Building, 200 Taylor St., Ft. Worth. Registration is $15. Advance reservations are preferred, but not required. For more information or to enroll, call 817-884-1945.

Nacogdoches: The SFA Mast Arboretum will host a garden seminar “Deck the Halls — Using Evergreens to Decorate for the Holidays” on December 1 from 9 a.m. until noon in room 118 of the Agriculture Building. Evergreen branches and garlands once served as symbols of enduring life and a fruitful year to come. Join Dawn Stover, Research Associate at the SFA Mast Arboretum, to learn how to create elegant wreaths and garlands using materials from mother nature. Participants will learn principles of wreath, garland, and centerpiece construction and make a wreath to enjoy at home for the holidays. In addition to the traditional wreaths and garlands, Dawn will be introducing new crafts using natural items from the garden and forest. Class size is limited, so please register in advance for this wonderful holiday seminar. To register or for more information, call 936-468-1832 or email erodewald@sfasu.edu. Cost is $20 for members of the SFA Garden Friends and $25 for non-members.

Austin: Jane Tillman (Travis Audubon Society) will offer plant choices and other tips to make your yard more attractive to Austin’s birds when she leads “Cultivate Your Backyard Birds,” at 2 p.m., December 2, at It’s About Thyme Garden Center. 11726 Manchaca, Austin. Tillman was recently recognized as the National Volunteer of the Year by the National Wildlife Federation for her work creating wildlife habitats. Free. For more information, call 280-1192 or visit www.itsaboutthyme.com.

San Antonio: “Growing Herbs During Winter — It’s Easy as 1-2-3,” which is open to the public, will be held from 6:30 p.m. until 8:30 p.m., December 4, at 3355 Cherry Ridge, Suite 208, San Antonio. Master Gardener Don Crites will talk about common culinary herbs, both mild and savory or stronger and pungent, while Horticulturist David Rodriguez will provide instruction on how to select, properly plant, and successfully maintain herbs in the garden. Registration fee is $10 and may be paid in advance or at the door. For more information and to RSVP, contact Angel Torres at 210-467-6575 or visit www.bexar-tx.tamu.edu/earth-kind-horticulture.

La Marque: “The Urban Farmstead” will be presented from 8 a.m. until 4 p.m., December 8, at Galveston County AgriLife Extension Office in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (FM 519), La Marque. Presentation provided for homeowners who wish to have a better and more self-sufficient life whether they live on a city lot or small acreage. Topics include intensive vegetable gardening, back yard poultry and small livestock production. Also included will be video presentations of urban farmsteads on city lots and small acreages in Galveston County. This seminar is about ordinary people doing extraordinary things. Registration fee of $12 covers lunch and program handouts; due by December 3 (visit http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/) for more details. For course reservations, call 281-534-3413, ext. 12 or email GALV3@wt.net.

Houston: HUG (Houston Urban Gardeners) will meet at 6:30 p.m., December 10, at the Houston Garden Center, 1500 Hermann Park Dr., Houston. To access parking go to the lot right across from Miller Outdoor Theater. Kim Haven, owner/manager of Billabong Fresh Flower Farm, will describe her small (20 acre) family farm in Waller dedicated to producing high-quality specialty cut flowers. She’ll describe the challenges and success stories of her business. Kim can be found at her Texas Cut Flowers booth at many of Houston’s farmers markets. Lien Nguyen, a creative floral designer with Prestige Events, will demonstrate some impressive yet simple arrangements using common containers and supplies just in time for the holidays.

Humble: Mercer volunteer Sherry Cruse surprises and inspires participants with selections of plant materials and containers that bring color and style indoors during the winter months during her presentation about “Decorating for the holidays” from noon until 2 p.m., Wednesday, December 12, at the Mercer Arboretum & Botanic Gardens, 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble. For more information, call 281-443-8731, or visit www.hcp4.net/mercer.

Humble: Join avid birders and novices from 8 a.m. until noon, Saturday, December 15, at the Mercer Arboretum & Botanic Gardens, 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble, as you take part in Christmas Bird Count, an annual national event sanctioned by the Audubon Society, Houston is on a major flyway for migrating species and this is a great way to see some amazing birds as they head south or spend their winters in Mercer’s gardens. For more information, contact Al Barr at albbarr@comcast.net or call 281-443-8731.

MONTHLY MEETINGS

FIRST WEEK

Houston: The Harris County Master Gardeners meet at noon the first Tuesday of each month at the Texas AgriLife Extension, 3033 Bear Creek Drive (near the intersection of Highway 6 and Patterson Road), Houston. For additional information visit http://hcmga.tamu.edu or call 281-855-5600.

Wichita Falls: The Wichita County Master Gardener Association meets at 5:30 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 600 Scott Street, Wichita Falls, on the first Tuesday of each month. For more information, visit www.txmg.org/wichita or call 940-716-8610.

Kilgore: Northeast Texas Organic Gardeners meets at 1 p.m. on the first Wednesday of each month. For more information, call Carole Ramke at 903-986-9475.

Allen: The Allen Garden Club meets at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month, February through December, at the Allen Heritage Center, 100 E. Main St., Allen. For more information, visit www.allengardenclub.org.

Brownwood: The Brown County Master Gardeners Association meets the first Thursday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 605 Fisk Ave., Brownwood. For further information, call Mary Green Engle at 325-784-8453.

Gonzalas: Gonzales Master Gardeners Association holds their monthly meeting on the first Thursday of each month. A short program is presented. The meeting is held from noon until 1 p.m. at 1405 Conway St. (Odd Fellows Lodge). Bring a bag lunch, drinks provided. Contact AgriLife Extension Office at 830-672-8531 or e-mail gonzales@ag.tamu.edu for more information.

SECOND WEEK

Austin: Austin Organic Gardeners Club meets at 6:30 p.m. on the second Monday of each month (except December) at the Austin Area Garden Center, 2220 Barton Springs Road, Zilker Botanical Gardens in Austin. For more information, visit www.austinorganicgardeners.org.

Evant: The Evant Garden Club meets on the second Tuesday of each month at 10 a.m., usually at the bank in downtown Evant. To confirm the date, time and place of each month's meeting, call 254-471-5585.

Marion: The Guadalupe County (Schertz/Seguin) Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets on the second Tuesday of each month except July and August at The Library, 500 Bulldog, Marion. There is a plant exchange and meet-and-greet begins at 6:30 p.m. followed by the program at 7 p.m. Visitors are welcome. For more information or an application to join NPSOT visit www.npsot.org/GuadalupeCounty/ or contact guadalupecounty@npsot.org.

Jacksboro: The Jacksboro Garden Club meets at 9:30 a.m. the second Wednesday of each month (except June, July and August) at the Concerned Citizens Center, 400 East Pine Street, Jacksboro. For more information, call Melinda at 940-567-6218.

Longview: The Gregg County Master Gardeners Association meets the second Wednesday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 405 E. Marshall Ave., Longview. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program preceding the business meeting. For further information call Cindy Gill at 903-236-8429 or visit www.gregg-tx.tamu.edu.

Rockport: The Rockport Herb & Rose Study Group, founded in March 2003, meets the second Wednesday of each month at 10 a.m. at 619 N. Live Oak Street, Room 14, Rockport, to discuss all aspects of using and growing herbs, including historical uses and tips for successful propagation and cultivation. Sometimes they take field trips and have cooking demonstrations in different locations. For more information, contact Linda 361-729-6037, Ruth 361-729-8923 or Cindy 979-562-2153 or visit www.rockportherbs.org and http://rockportherbies.blogspot.com.

Beaumont: The Jefferson County Master Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the AgriLife Extension Office, 1225 Pearl Street, Suite 200, Beaumont. For more information, call 409-835-8461.

Georgetown: The Williamson County Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the Georgetown Public Library, 402 W. 8th Street. Georgetown. For additional information, contract Billye Adams at 512-863-9636 or visit http://www.npsot.org/WilliamsonCounty/default.htm.

Orange: The Orange County Master Gardeners Association holds their monthly meeting on the second Thursday of each month. A short program is presented. The meeting starts at 6:30 p.m. at the Salvation Army Bldg. cor. MLK & Strickland in Orange. Pot luck supper at 6 p.m. Visit http://txmg.org/orange for more information.

San Antonio: The San Antonio Herb Society meets at 7 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month at the San Antonio Garden Center, 3310 N. New Braunfels (corner of Funston & N. New Braunfels). For more information on programs, visit www.sanantonioherbs.org.

Angleton: The Brazoria County Master Gardeners meet at 11 a.m. on the second Friday of each month at the Brazoria County Extension Office, 21017 County Road 171, Angleton. There is a general business meeting followed by a brief educational program each month. For further information call 979-864-1558, ext.110.

College Station: The A&M Garden Club meets on the second Friday of each month during the school year at 9:30 a.m. in the training room of the College Station Waste Water Facility building at the end of North Forest Parkway, College Station. Expert speakers, plant sharing, and federated club projects help members learn about gardening in the Brazos Valley, floral design, conservation, and more. For more information, visit http://www.amgardenclub.com/.

Houston: The Spring Branch African Violet Club meets the second Saturday of each month, January through November, at 10:30am at the Copperfield Baptist Church, 8350 Highway 6 North, Houston. Call Karla at 281-748-8417 prior to attending to confirm meeting date and time.

Dallas: The Rainbow Garden Club of North Texas meets the second Sunday of each month at 2 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Meetings are held at member’s homes and garden centers around the area. For more information, visit www.RainbowGardenClub.com.

THIRD WEEK

Arlington: The Arlington Men's Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the third Monday of each month (except December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact Lance Jepson at LJepson@aol.com.

Cleburne: The Johnson County Master Gardeners meet at 2 p.m. on the third Monday of each month at McGregor House, 1628 W. Henderson, Cleburne, which includes a program and a meet & greet. For more information, call Sharon Smith at 817-894-7700.

Rockport: Monthly meetings of the Aransas/San Patricio Master Gardeners are held at 10 a.m. on the third Tuesday of each month at Texas AgriLife Extension Service - Aransas County Office, 892 Airport Rd., Rockport. For additional information, e-mail aransas-tx@tamu.edu or call 361-790-0103.

Sugar Land: The Sugar Land Garden Club meets on the third Tuesday of each month, September through November and January through April at 10 a.m. at the Sugar Land Community Center, 226 Matlage Way, Sugar Land. The club hosts a different speaker each month. For more information, visit www.sugarlandgardenclub.org.

Denton: The Denton Organic Society, a group devoted to sharing information and educating the public regarding organic principles, meets the third Wednesday of each month (except July, August and December) at the Denton Senior Center, 509 N. Bell Avenue. Meetings are free and open to the public. Meetings begin at 7 p.m. and are preceded by a social at 6:30. For more information, call 940-382-8551.

Glen Rose: The Somervell County Master Gardeners meet at 10 a.m., the third Wednesday of each month at the Somervell County AgriLife Extension office, 1405 Texas Drive, Glen Rose. Visitors are welcome. For more information, call 254-897-2809 or visit www.somervellmastergardeners.org.

Granbury: The Lake Granbury Master Gardeners meet at 1 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at the Hood County Annex 1, 1410 West Pearl Street, Granbury. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program each month preceding the business meeting. For information on topics call 817-579-3280 or visit http://www.hoodcountymastergardeners.org/.

Seabrook: The Harris County Precinct 2 Master Gardeners hold an educational program at 10 a.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at The Meeting Room at Clear Lake Park (on the Lakeside), 5001 NASA Road 1, Seabrook. The programs are free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu.

Brownwood: Brownwood Garden Club meets the third Thursday of each month, 11:30 a.m.– 1 p.m.  The club meetings are at Southside Baptist Church, 1219 Indian Creek Road, with refreshments and a speaker presentation. Visitors are welcome. For more information, email boeblingen@centex.net or call 817-454-8175).

Houston: The Native Plant Society of Texas — Houston (NPSOT-H) meets at 7 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except for October (4th Thursday) and December (2nd Thursday). Location varies. For locations, for more information on programs, and for information about native plants for Houston, visit http://www.npsot.org/Houston.

Rosenberg: The Fort Bend Master Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except December at the Bud O’Shieles Community Center located at 1330 Band Road, Rosenberg. For more information, call 281-341-7068 or visit www.fbmg.com.

Seguin: The Guadalupe County Master Gardeners meets at 7 p.m. the third Thursday of each month, except June and December, at the Texas AgriLife Extension Bldg. at 210 E. Live Oak, Seguin. An educational program precedes the business meeting. The public is invited to attend. For topic or other information, call 830-379-1972 or visit www.guadalupecountymastergardeners.org.

FOURTH WEEK

New Braunfels: The Comal Master Gardeners meet at 6 p.m. the fourth Monday of each month (except December) at the GVTC Auditorium, 36101 FM 3159, New Braunfels. For additional information, call 830-620-3440.

Atlanta: The Caddo Wildflower Chapter of Native Plants Society meets the fourth Tuesday of each month at the Horne Enterprise building in Atlanta at 7 p.m. Visitors are welcome. For additional information, contact Gene Bobo at gene.bobo@agnet.tamu.edu.

Brackenridge Park: The Native Plant Society San Antonio Chapter meets every fourth Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. in the Lions Field Adult and Senior Center, 2809 Broadway at E. Mulberry, Brackenridge Park, except August and December. Social and seed/plant exchange at 6:30 p.m. Free and open to the public. For more information, contact Bea at 210-999-7292 or visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio.

Bryan: The Brazos County Master Gardeners, a program of Texas AgriLife Extension, meet the fourth Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. at the Brazos Center, 3232 Briarcrest Drive, Bryan. There is a public gardening program at each meeting and pertinent information may be found at brazosmg.com or 979-823-0129.

Edna: The Jackson County Master Gardeners present their "Come Grown With Us" seminars on the fourth Tuesday of each month, January through October, beginning at 7 p.m. at 411 N. Wells, Edna. The seminars are free, open to the public and offer 2 CEU hours to Master Gardeners or others requiring them. For additional information, contact the Jackson County Extension Office at 361-782-3312.

Fort Worth: The Organic Garden Club of Forth Worth meets at 7 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday of each month except July and December at the Deborah Beggs Moncrief Garden Center, 3220 Botanic Blvd., Ft. Worth. Refreshments are served. For more information, call 817-263-9322 or visit www.ogcfw.webs.com.

San Antonio: The Native Plant Society of Texas San Antonio Chapter meets the fourth Tuesday of each month, except August and December, at the Lions Field Adult & Senior Center, 2809 Broadway, San Antonio. Social and plant/seed exchange at 6:30 p.m., program at 7:00 p.m. For more information, visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio or call Bea at 210-999-7292.

Houston: The Houston Chapter of the Native Prairie Association of Texas (HNPAT) meets from 7 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. the fourth Wednesday of each month at Bayland Park Community Center, 6400 Bissonnet, Houston. For more information, contact hnpat@prairies.orgrg.

Leander: The Leander Garden Club meets on the fourth Thursday of each month (except July and August) at 10:30 a.m. at the community room behind the Greater Texas Federal Credit Union,1300 N. Bell, Cedar Park, unless there is special event planned. Following a program and short business meeting, we share a pot-luck luncheon. To confirm the meeting place and time, please call president Cathy Clark-Ramsey at 512-963-4698 or email info@leandergc.org.

Dallas: The Greater Dallas Organic Garden Club meets at 7:00 p.m. on the fourth Thurday of each month at the REI, 4515 LBJ Freeway, Dallas. For more information, call 214-824-2448 or visit www.gdogc.org.

Arlington: The Arlington Organic Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the last Thursday of each month (except November and December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact David at 817-483-7746.


Texas Fruit and Vegetable Gardening

By Greg Grant

This new book incorporates Greg’s horticultural expertise along with his homespun writing style and, unlike other books on vegetable gardening, this one includes chapters on fruit, nuts and herbs along with a nice selection of family recipes.

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  • Planting, care and harvesting information for more than 60 edibles
  • Popular vegetable selections from arugula to tomatoes
  • A variety of common and unusual fruits and herbs
  • Advice on garden planning, creating the perfect soil, watering and more!
  • It is a must have for every serious gardener in Texas and neighboring states.

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In Greg's Garden:
A Pineywoods Perspective on Gardening, Nature and Family

An intimate and personal exploration of the life of one of Texas’s most beloved gardeners, In Greg’s Garden: A Pineywoods Perspective on Gardening, Nature and Family gathers in a single volume the first nine years of Greg Grant’s columns from Texas Gardener magazine.

Revised and updated from their original publication, these 54 essays reveal the heart and soul of a seventh generation native Texan who has devoted his entire life to gardening, nature and family. With degrees in floriculture and horticulture from Texas A&M University and extensive hands-on experience as a horticulturist with the Texas Agricultural Extension Service, Stephen F. Austin State University, Mercer Arboretum and San Antonio Botanical Gardens, Grant has successfully introduced dozens of plants to the Texas nursery industry, all while maintaining long-held family property and renovating the homes of his ancestors in Arcadia, Texas.

In Greg’s Garden: A Pineywoods Perspective on Gardening, Nature and Family is a must-read for every Texas gardener.

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Wish you'd saved them?

Are you missing an important issue of Texas Gardener? Or, perhaps, just tired of thumbing through stacks of back issues looking for the tips and techniques you need to make your garden grow? These new CDs provide easy access to all six issues of

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volume 24 (November/December 2004 through September/October 2005),
volume 25 (November/December 2005 through September/October 2006),
volume 26 (November/December 2006 through September/October 2007),
volume 27 (November/December 2007 through September/October 2008),
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Texas Gardener’s Seeds is published weekly. © Suntex Communications, Inc. 2012. All rights reserved. You may forward this publication to your friends and colleagues if it is sent in its entirety. No individual part of this newsletter may be reproduced in any manner without prior written permission from the publisher.

Missed an issue? Back issues of Texas Gardener’s Seeds are available at www.texasgardener.com/newsletters.

Publisher: Chris S. Corby ● Editor: Michael Bracken

Texas Gardener’s Seeds, P.O. Box 9005, Waco, Texas 76714 ● www.TexasGardener.com