January 16, 2013

Welcome to Texas Gardener’s Seeds, the weekly newsletter for Texas gardeners. Please do not reply to this e-mail because the sending address is not monitored. See the bottom of this newsletter for information on how to subscribe, unsubscribe, or contact the editor.



A hanging-plant frost cover with drawstrings is a necessity; straps hold the cover in place so both hands are free to tuck in the plant and close the drawstrings, which makes covering plants safe and easy. (Photo courtesy of Frost Protek)
Surviving frost: Beyond sheet and blanket frost covers for plants

By Del Williams
Freelance Writer

Most gardeners want their plants and flowers to last despite unpredictable frosts that can kill or damage them. After finding the right plant colors and varieties, after seeding, potting, fertilizing, watering, and pruning, it can be frustrating to have a late spring or early fall frost kill them off and have to start over.

“You never know when a frost will hit,” says Steve Goto, a southern California-based expert nurseryman and lecturer known as the Tomato King, who conducted 80 seminars throughout western states last year. “Average frost dates are based on history, but cannot accurately predict the future.”

For gardeners trying to protect plants from frost the traditional way, there are challenges. It is hard to move heavy potted plants, containers, or hanging baskets indoors or to protected spots, particularly with a late night frost warning. Some gardeners attempt to move their plants out during the day to get needed UV sunlight, then back indoors at night to keep them warm. Yet this is difficult for those who are busy or forget; and when plants are repeatedly moved, they are likely to damage buds, blooms, branches, or trailing stems.

To protect plants from frost, home gardeners have traditionally tried to create makeshift covers from sheets, blankets, towels, or plastic, but these can actually harm plants, even when not blown off by wind. Instead, experts are suggesting some easy new alternatives that are much more effective.

“Once sheets, blankets, or towels absorb moisture, they become heavy, can crush the plant, and take a long time to dry out,” says Goto. “They offer no thermal protection from frost when wet with rain or dew, nor does plastic. They can block air circulation, making frost crystals more likely to form on the plant. Since they block needed sunlight, gardeners have to remove them during the day to allow UV exposure then replace them at night, but few are willing to do so for long.”

For effective plant frost protection during the growing season with minimal effort, Goto and a growing number of gardening experts are recommending an innovative type of frost cover called Frost Protek. Made from spun polypropylene, the same fabric used by commercial growers for plant protection, the frost cover insulates better than sheets, blankets, towels, or plastic, and can protect plants to 26 °F/ -3 °C.

Unlike sheets, blankets, and towels, the lightweight fabric frost cover is “breathable” and weighs less than 1 oz. per square yard, so it will not crush delicate plants, foilage, or blossoms when wet and quickly dries out. Since the frost cover allows in enough air and UV rays to keep plants healthy, it can be left on for days or weeks. In bad weather, plants can simply be left covered in place rather than repeatedly covered and uncovered or moved.

“I’ve found the Frost Protek plant cover insulates much better than sheets, blankets, towels, or plastic,” says Goto, who has used it on a range of vegetables, herbs, soft tissue annuals, and tropical varieties, and frequently uses it for frost protection when he travels. “The cover keeps frost crystals off the foilage, but does not physically lay on the plant the way sheets, blankets and towels do.”

“Once I put the frost cover on, I don’t have to take it off since it lets in enough light and air to keep the plant healthy,” adds Goto. “To grow tomatoes in a cool season tomato program, I kept the cover on for 90 days without taking it off, with excellent tomato production.”

The fabric frost cover, which was originally developed by an avid gardener for her own plants, comes in various sizes and shapes designed to protect plants including those in pots, containers, hanging baskets, vegetable rows, window boxes, trellises, grow boxes, and even trees up to 6’ tall.

Unlike improvised sheet and blanket frost covers that are often weighted down with rocks or bricks to prevent wind from blowing them off plants, the fabric frost cover uses drawstring closures to stay in place. This holds in warmth around the plant, and enables one to put the cover on and take it off in seconds, even for hanging baskets.

“I find a hanging plant frost cover with drawstrings a necessity when I climb a ladder to hang a geranium basket,” says Goto. “Straps hold the cover in place so I have both hands free to tuck in the plant and close the drawstrings. This makes it safe and easy to cover the plant in about 30 to 60 seconds.”

Yamagami’s Nursery, a Cupertino, Calif.-based garden center, uses frost protection covers primarily to prevent damage to seedlings, subtropical flowering plants, and dwarf citrus trees in containers, according to Carolyn Villa-Scott, the nursery’s advertising manager.

“If you drape sheets, blankets, or towels directly on the plants in a frost, they will ‘freeze weld’ to the plant, damaging it,” says Villa-Scott. “It can be hard to secure these from blowing off, and lightweight plastic frost covers are often ripped when being staked down, compromising their effectiveness and longevity.”

“We’ve found that we can put the Frost Protek covers directly on plants and they won’t freeze weld,” says Villa-Scott. “We protect potted plants, containers, and hanging baskets from frost so they don’t have to be moved or repeatedly covered and uncovered. With the covers’ drawstring closure, it’s easy to cover an entire container, including the plant’s roots, which makes for better frost protection.”

According to Villa-Scott, one size of frost cover fits neatly over a half-barrel container, which many customers use. She finds a large bag type cover particularly effective for protecting dwarf citrus trees in containers, and a row cover useful for protecting seedlings. She says the frost covers are much stronger than traditional covers, and capable of lasting several seasons.

Villa-Scott, who uses the frost covers at home as well, credits them for saving her back porch plants from a three-day frost. “Once when I left on a trip, a three-night frost hit,” she says. “If I hadn’t covered them, all the plants on my back porch including tender evergreen perennials could have died. Instead, when I returned home, they were fine with no frost damage.”

Del Williams is a technical writer based in Torrance, California.


Editor's Note: Gardening news is slow at the beginning of the year, and many gardeners are unable to work in their gardens during winter. We thought you might enjoy a change of pace during this slow season, so following is a gardening-themed short story presented for your enjoyment. — Michael Bracken, editor

Fertile Fiction
Dragon House Heritage Roses

By Genevieve Duncan
Freelance Writer

“You be careful over there, Tammy,” my sister scolded me. “That decrepit old house could fall down any minute and no one would ever find you. You know they officially condemned it… Spooky old house.”

Scaredy cat.

“I’ll be back soon, Carol. I just want to be sure I get those favorite pink mini roses Grandma Ella loved so much before the bulldozers come. Call ya when I’m done.”

I snapped my cell phone shut and tucked it in my jeans pocket as I pulled into the drive of my great grandmother’s house. I should say the electric company’s house, as I would be signing the deed over later in the week. A sad choice, but one that had to be made. Still, that didn’t mean Gran’s heritage roses had to be buried under the cement that would become the parking lot replacing my family’s rose garden. Bill Klenickie, the electric company’s agent, would turn a blind eye if he saw me digging in the dirt. He and the rest of the town knew I would never let those flowers go under.

I hung my hands on the top of the steering wheel and looked up and out the windshield to the top of the parapets on the roof. The once vibrant, lovely old mansion now looked like a decayed gray dragon. Scales fell from its once grand body to expose dry bones to the elements. The house was fragile and dangerous. Cindy was right. I needed to be careful.

I wiped tears from my eyes, took a deep breath and jumped out of my car. My boots crunched on the gravel drive as I walked to the trunk. Just dig up the roses and leave, I told myself as I pulled out a few buckets, a shovel and my gardening tools. Don’t look back. Take only the good memories.

The trunk slamming disturbed a mockingbird and she fluttered out of her nest in the pecan tree above. She fussed at me as I approached the house and rounded the corner to the back garden.

“Don’t worry, I’m not here to take your nest,” I tried to assure her as she dive-bombed and rolled at me with stunning accuracy. She took her defensive post on the corner of the house and kept a steely black eye on my activities.

She had been chattering so much with me that I had missed what now sounded like whistling. Definitely whistling. And it was a male whistle. I took a few cautious steps and gripped my shovel a little tighter just in case. Who knew what I might find.

The tune suddenly stopped. I stood like a statue for a moment and the song started up again. I rounded the corner to what had always been my grandmother’s garden, brimming and spilling with wild roses of every color from deep blood red, pink and white, snap dragons in fuchsia and yellows, pink evening primroses and even stray bluebonnets in the spring. I saw gaping huge holes in the earth where all her prized roses had clung to life for over a hundred years.

What are you doing?” I screamed at a man with his booted foot on the lip of the shovel posed to dig up another precious plant. “Stop that right now! You have no right. I’m calling the police.” I dropped my buckets and fished my cell phone out of my pocket.

He seemed just as startled as me. “Wait! I’m just moving these beautiful plants. I didn’t think anyone would really care. But I couldn’t bear to see them destroyed.”

“Well, I care. They are my plants.” At least until the end of the week. “Who are you anyway?” I gave him a wary look and still held the phone in my hand with my finger on 911 speed dial.

“Jackson Shultz. My grandfather used to own the Shultz’s grocery here in town.”

“Jackson? From swimming lessons when we were kids? ” He was all grown up now. Handsome, even covered in dirt. “I thought you had moved to Dallas.”

I snapped my phone shut and put it back into my pocket. I could still feel my heart pounding, but now it was more from the childhood crush standing in front of me now, all man. I smoothed my clammy palms over my thighs.

“Look, I’m really sorry if I overstepped my bounds. You can have all the bushes back if you want. I was planting some of them at my house, some at the courthouse, since I thought I had recalled your granddaddy worked there once, then some at the library so everyone could enjoy them.” He smiled a wide, gleaming smile at me accented by a streak of mud on his cheek. “There’s only these two left.” He pointed at two buckets at his feet. “Tell you what. You have dinner with me I’ll plant the most beautiful rose bush I found at your very doorstep.” He smiled again. Dimples. Such a sucker for dimples. I felt myself softening. To be honest, melting. What’s that they say? When a man plants a rose for a woman, his love for her is forever in his heart. After all, how bad could he be if he was rescuing my grandmother’s roses for the sheer love of the beauty of a heritage rose?

“I think I’ll take you up on that dinner. But, you’ll have to plant those roses first.” I smiled and picked up the buckets of lovely pink rosebuds.

“Let me carry those for you.” He winked at me. “I’m looking forward to seeing what blossoms.”

So was I.

Genevieve Duncan is a romantic Texas gardener and a longarm quilter. Find more of her Texas short stories: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00A6YEXVC.


Texas A&M Forest Service employees honored during annual AgriLife conference

Texas A&M Forest Service

A 20-year veteran forester with Texas A&M Forest Service was honored Tuesday, January 8, with the 2012 Vice Chancellor’s Award in Excellence for Public Service in Forestry.

Sustainable Forestry Department Head Burl Carraway III received the award during the annual Texas A&M AgriLife Conference held at Texas A&M University’s flagship campus in College Station.

The Award in Excellence for Public Service in Forestry is one of 17 awards presented each year by the Vice Chancellor for Agriculture and Life Sciences as a way to recognize and celebrate the commitment and contributions made by those working under the umbrella of Texas A&M AgriLife.

The forestry award, in particular, is presented each year to someone who consistently goes above and beyond, making exceptional contributions and displaying exceptional commitment to the agency’s mission.

“Burl is innovative and willing to take on some of the toughest issues facing the agency and Texas. His entire career can be characterized by someone willing to push the envelope and look for new ways to meet our natural resource challenges,” said Texas A&M Forest Service Director Tom Boggus. “He is a proven leader and has built a very strong team that is the envy of forest agencies across the nation.”

Throughout his career, Carraway consistently has taken the lead in coordinating various state projects and programs including environmental forestry, state stewardship and water quality. He also has led projects across the Southern United States as a member of professional organizations such as the Southern Group of State Foresters, the Texas Forestry Association and the Texas Society of American Foresters.

Carraway earned a Bachelor of Science in biology from Furman University in 1991 and a Master of Forest Resources from Clemson University in 1993.

“Service is at the heart of our agency, and it’s an honor to receive an award that is reflective of that,” said Carraway, who is based in College Station. “Everyone who works here does so because they want to make a difference. I’m extremely fortunate to be surrounded by a really great group of folks.”

Five other Texas A&M Forest Service employees also were recognized at the conference.

State Wildland Urban Interface and Prevention Coordinator Justice Jones of Conroe and East Texas Operations Department Head Wes Moorehead of Lufkin were honored as graduates of the Texas A&M AgriLife Advanced Leadership Program - Cohort I, which ran from May 2010 to January 2012.

The 18-month program focuses on the development of leadership skills and a greater understanding of The Texas A&M University System and its land-grant mission. As part of the program, participants interact with administrators, leadership professionals and their peers, gaining experience and tools designed to enhance their effectiveness as leaders.

“This was a great growth opportunity for me,” Moorehead said. “It not only offered outstanding leadership tools and training, but gave me a much better understanding of how TFS fits within AgriLife and the Texas A&M System.”

Jones echoed his sentiments, saying he felt privileged to have been selected to participate in the programs' first cohort.

“It provided me with a clear understanding of the important role that Texas A&M Forest Service plays in helping the Texas A&M University System achieve its land grant mission.”

Regional Forester Joel Hambright and Wildland Urban Interface Specialist Karen Stafford were recognized for joining Cohort II, which started last May and will conclude in January 2014.

Paul Hannemann, Incident Response department head and chief of fire operations, also was recognized during the conference as a recipient of the 2012 Regents Fellow Service Award, an honor bestowed upon him last fall.


Gardening tips

"If you already have your onions in the ground," suggests Tom Harris, "don’t forget to fertilize them every 3 weeks with 21-0-0. Check out www.dixondalefarms.com for details."

Have a favorite gardening tip you’d like to share? Texas Gardener’s Seeds is seeking brief gardening tips from Texas gardeners to use in future issues. If we publish your tip in Seeds, we will send you a free Texas Gardener 2012 Planning Guide & Calendar. Please send your tips of 50 words or less to the editor at: Gardening Tips.


Did you know...

Danae racemosa is commonly known as Alexandrian laurel and is said by some sources to be the true laurel used to wreath the brows of poets. This lovely plant is sometimes found at very old Southern home sites but is difficult to find at nurseries. Source: Heirloom Gardening in the South by William C. Welch and Greg Grant.


Upcoming garden events.

If you would like your organization’s events included in "Upcoming Garden Events" or would like to make a change to a listed event, please contact us at Garden Events. To ensure inclusion in this column, please provide complete details at least three weeks prior to the event.

JANUARY 

Austin: “The Wonderful World of Seeds,” will be presented Thursday, January 17, from 10 a.m. until noon, at the Travis County AgriLife Extension Office, 1600 B Smith Rd., Austin. Let Master Gardener propagation specialists teach how to start, grow and save flower, herb and vegetable seeds. Learn from presentation, examples and hands-on participation in the class room and in the demonstration garden, along with handouts and additional resource lists. Seminar fee is $20 and you must register at https://agriliferegister.tamu.edu with keyword: Seeds. For more information, phone 979-845-2604 or visit www.tcmastergardeners.org.

Seguin: Guadalupe County Master Gardeners will meet Thursday, January 17, at 7 p.m. in the AgriLife Extension Bldg. at 210 E. Live Oak, Seguin. Paul Johnson, a member of the Texas A&M Forest Service, will talk about proper tree trimming. Paul is an International Society of Arboriculture (ISA) Board Certified Master Arborist & Municipal Specialist. Meetings are free and open to the public. For more information visit www.guadalupecountymastergardeners.org or call 830-303-3889.

Humble: Mercer Arboretum & Botanic Gardens, 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble, will host a reception with Jimmy Turner of Dallas Arboretum. Friday, January 18, 6 p.m. - 8 p.m. Turner, horticulturist extraordinaire, will amaze with an eye-popping visual tour of the Dallas Arboretum. Learn about The Mercer Society coach tour to Dallas in October 2013! An evening reception precedes this talk. TMS members $18 single, $30 couple. Non-members $20 single, $35 couple. Call 281-443-8731 for reservations. Anyone requiring special assistance to participate in any program, or to obtain additional information, should contact Mercer at 281-443-8731, or visit www.hcp4.net/mercer.

Houston: Urban Harvest will host the 13th Annual Urban Harvest Fruit Tree Sale from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. (or until sold out) on Saturday, January 19, at the HCC Southwest Campus, 5601 West Loop South Freeway, Houston. For additional information, call 713-880-5540 or visit www.UrbanHarvest.org.

Houston: Tour the working and demonstration gardens maintained by the Harris County Master Gardeners at Precinct 2 on Monday, January 21, 8:30 a.m.-11 a.m., at Genoa Friendship Garden, 1202 Genoa Red Bluff, Houston. Master Gardeners will be on hand to answer your gardening questions. A program on Tool Care / Sharpening and Pruning Techniques (Bring your clippers) will be offered from 9:30 a.m. - 10:30 am.

La Marque: Gardener Herman Auer will present “Growing Citrus in the Home Landscape,” Tuesday, January 22, from 6:30 p.m. until 8 p.m. at the Galveston County AgriLife Extension Office in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (FM 519), La Marque. Learn the best rootstocks and the varieties for the Galveston area as well as the hardiness of different varieties. Find out how to plant citrus trees and even how to grow citrus from seed. Review the growing and drainage requirements for most citrus. For course reservations, call 281-534-3413, ext. 12 or email GALV3@wt.net.

Humble: Mercer Arboretum & Botanic Gardens, 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble, will host Creating a Personal Garden Sanctuary. Wednesday, January 25, 8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Darnell Schreiber will inspire and guide you in designing the perfect serene space in your garden. This is a hands-on class that includes a tour of the gardens. Bring photos of your garden to work from. Other supplies will be provided but please bring a pencil and eraser. Free, but limited to 18 students. Call 281-443-8731 for reservations. Anyone requiring special assistance to participate in any program, or to obtain additional information, should contact Mercer at 281-443-8731, or visit www.hcp4.net/mercer.

Austin: Tree Care Tips will be presented Saturday, January 26, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., at Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, 4801 La Crosse Ave., Austin. Winter is planting time for woody species in Central Texas, and the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center shows you how at free admission Tree Talk Winter Walk. Enjoy a tree planting tutorial, tree identification tips and more during guided walks mid-day in the Mollie Steves Zachry Texas Arboretum (access it from the central courtyard past the café, using Hill Country Trails entry). At the Arboretum Tent area, purchase native trees and shrubs and Yan Lee’s tree drawings, learn to count tree rings and more. Kids’ activities include supervised tree climbs, and author Margie Crisp signs her Colorado River book in The Store after her 10 a.m. walk. For more information, call 512.232.0100 or go to: http://www.wildflower.org/ttww.

Conroe: The Montgomery County Master Gardeners are having their annual Fruit and Nut Tree Sale on Saturday, January 26, at 9020 Airport Road, Conroe. Program by Michael Potter begins at 8 a.m.; sale is from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. For more information and a plant list, call 936-539-7824 or visit www.mcmga.com.

La Marque:: Master Gardener Luke Stripling will present “Spring Vegetable Gardening,” Saturday, January 26, from 9 a.m. until 11:30 a.m. at the Galveston County AgriLife Extension Office in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (FM 519), La Marque. Stripling has more than 65 years of hands-on experience in growing vegetables. Learn how to plan and start a vegetable garden. Find out about the best soils, location and plant varieties for Galveston County. Gain knowledge of pollination, mulching, composting, and the effects of full sun and shade on vegetable gardening. For course reservations, call 281-534-3413, ext. 12 or email GALV3@wt.net.

La Marque: Master Gardener John Jons will present “Anyone Can Grow Roses,” Saturday, January 26, from 1 p.m. until 3 p.m. at the Galveston County AgriLife Extension Office in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (FM 519), La Marque. Topics covered include the basics of growing hybrid tea roses, variety selection, bed preparation, planting and culture, insect and disease control. For course reservations, call 281-534-3413, ext. 12 or email GALV3@wt.net.

Rosenberg: Fort Bend Master Gardeners will host their Annual Fruit and Citrus Tree Sale on Saturday, January 26, at the Fort Bend County Fairgrounds - Barn H, 4310 Highway 36S, Rosenberg. The sale will open at 9 a.m. and will run until 1 p.m. or until sold out. There will be a Pre-Sale Program on Saturday, January 19, at 10:30 a.m. at the Bud O'Shieles Community Center located at 1330 Band Road, Rosenberg. It will include how to heel in your fruit trees, pruning and how to plant as well as an overview of plants at the sale. For additional information, call 281-341-7068 or visit www.fbmg.com.

La Marque: Dr. David Cohen will present “Growing Blueberries,” Tuesday, January 29, from 6:30 p.m. until 8 p.m. at the Galveston County AgriLife Extension Office in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (FM 519), La Marque. Learn the facts about blueberries and site selection and preparation. Find out about variety recommendations for this area and the planting, spacing, fertilizing and pruning requirements. Gather information on harvesting and understand the problems and the costs of growing blueberries. For course reservations, call 281-534-3413, ext. 12 or email GALV3@wt.net.

FEBRUARY

Dallas: Free Lawn Care Seminar. Learn ways to maintain a healthy lawn with less frequent watering, Saturday, February 2, at Richland College Fannin Hall, 12800 Abrams Road, Dallas, from 9-11 a.m. Gail Donaldson, a turf and irrigation specialist, and Water Conservation Manager for the City of Allen, will teach caring for lawns like an expert. Subjects covered will include basic lawn care, common turf problems, watering most efficiently and much more. Attendees can enter a drawing for free bags of Green Sense organic fertilizer from Rohde’s Nursery and Nature Store. Space is limited. Register online at SaveDallasWater.com or by calling 214-670-3155.

La Marque: The Galveston County Master Gardeners will host the Annual Fruit & Citrus Tree Seminar & Sale, Saturday, February 2, from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. at the Wayne Johnson Community Center in Carbide Park, 4102 Main St., La Marque. The sale includes a wide variety of fruit and citrus trees adapted to Gulf Coast growing area. Prior to the sale at 8:00 a.m., Heidi Sheesley of TreeSearch Farms will discuss many of the varieties available in the sale. Check website for updates: http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/index.htm.

Schertz: Heather Venhaus will present “The Lazy Gardener’s Landscape: Working with Nature,” Saturday, February 2, at the Schertz Civic Center, 1400 Schertz Pkwy, Schertz. Offered from 8:30 a.m. until 3:15 p.m. by the Guadalupe County Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas and Maldonado Nursery in Seguin, the 5-hour interactive workshop will help homeowners design personal landscape projects that thrive naturally on little water and are easy to maintain, plus are both pleasing to the eye and healthy for the environment. The cost for the full-day workshop, including lunch, is $36 per person. Workshop leader Venhaus specializes in residential landscapes and has spent the last decade working with scientists and educators on sustainable design, land restoration and environmental education. For a $2 general admission fee, the public can enjoy a gardening information fair that features vendors and community organizations offering information and products that complement the ideas discussed in the workshop. For more information or tickets, email Monta Zengerle at zengerlem@sbcglobal.net or call 830-285-4083.

San Antonio: Theresa Howard who specializes in beautiful arrangements using dried flowers will speak at the San Antonio Garden Center’s regular monthly meeting at 10 a.m. February 6. These meetings are free and open to anyone interested in gardening and floral arrangements. Theresa owns Yesterday’s Garden in La Vernia where they dry fresh roses for use in each unique arrangement. The SA Garden Center is located at 3310 N. New Braunfels & Funston by the Botanical Gardens. For more information call 824-9981.

Rosenberg: Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service of Brazoria, Fort Bend, Galveston, Harris, Wharton, and Waller Counties will host the 28th Annual Fort Bend County Vegetable Conference on Thursday, February 7, 2013, from 8 a.m. -4 p.m., in Building “C” of the Fort Bend County Fairgrounds, 4310 Hwy. 36 South, Rosenberg. Attendees may receive up to five continuing education units (CEUs) for attending the full-day educational event. The conference presentations will include: “Soil Management to Combat Soil Borne Pathogens” by Steve Divers, “Multiple Approaches to IPM” by Dr. Michael Hare, “Pest and Disease Resistant Vegetable Varieties” by Dr. Joe Masabni, “Pesticide Laws and Regulations” by Dr. Don Renchie, “Product Marketing” by Francisco Abello, and “Safe Preparations for Spray Applications” by Joe Mask. Keynote Speaker will be Mike Dobrovolsky. Contact Brandy Rader at the Fort Bend County Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service Office at 281-342-3034 to request a registration form. Registration on or before Monday, January 28, is $20 per person and includes lunch. The charge for registration received at the door is $25 per person and cannot be guaranteed a lunch.

La Marque: Master Gardener Sam Scarcella will present “Minimize Tomato Stress Factors to Maximize Yields,” Saturday, February 9, 9 a.m. -11:30 a.m. at Galveston County AgriLife Extension Office in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (FM 519), La Marque. A variety of stress factors can decrease tomato yields. An overview of stress factors and how to minimize them will be provided. For course reservations, call 281-534-3413, ext. 12 or email GALV3@wt.net.

La Marque: Master Gardener Mary Demeny will present “Kitchen Gardening,” Saturday, February 9, from 1 p.m.-3 p.m. at Galveston County AgriLife Extension Office in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (FM 519), La Marque. Presentation and discussion on vegetable gardening in your own backyard. Gardening on a smaller scale and making use of vegetables inter-planted in your flower beds and in pots will be emphasized. For course reservations, call 281-534-3413, ext. 12 or email GALV3@wt.net.

Humble: Mercer Arboretum & Botanic Gardens, 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble, will hold a Docent Tour with the Garden Director, Wednesday, February 13, 10:30 a.m. - noon. Darrin Duling will update participants on garden enhancements and the status of projects. Call 281-443-8731 for reservations. Anyone requiring special assistance to participate in any program, or to obtain additional information, should contact Mercer at 281-443-8731, or visit www.hcp4.net/mercer.

Humble: Darnell Schreiber, Phyllis McFarlane, and the March Mart Vegetable & Fruit committee will present "Tomatoes, Peppers, and Other Spring Vegetables" at the Mercer Arboretum & Botanic Gardens, 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble, Wednesday, February 13, noon - 2 p.m. They will discuss tomato varieties from heirloom, cherries, specialties, and big disease-resistant varieties, including growing techniques. They will also discuss sweet and hot peppers as well as good choices for miscellaneous spring vegetables. Also discussed will be diseases, insects, and recipes. Call 281-443-8731 for reservations. Anyone requiring special assistance to participate in any program, or to obtain additional information, should contact Mercer at 281-443-8731, or visit www.hcp4.net/mercerr.

San Antonio: Rick the Beekeeper shares frugal alternatives to mainstream beekeeping with the Herb Society, Thursday, February 14, 6:30-8:30 p.m., at San Antonio Garden Center, 3310 N. New Braunfels. Learn from people who know the most about herb gardening, cooking, sniffing, crafting and infusing...anything and everything is herbal for this meeting! For more information, visit www.sanantonioherbs.org. Free and open to the public.

Angleton: Citrus and Fruit Tree Sale by Brazoria County Master Gardeners at the Brazoria County AgriLife Extension Office, 21017 CR 171, Angleton, from 8 a.m. to noon, February 16. Includes more than 2,000 plants, including blackberries, blueberries, apples, avocados, figs, peaches, pears, plums, persimmons, pomegrantes, citrus of all kinds that will grow in Brazoria Co. and vegetables for the early gardener. For more information, visit http://txmg.org/brazoria.

Bryan: Texas A&M AgriLife Extension’s Brazos County Master Gardeners are hosting a water conservation seminar featuring rainwater harvesting. The program will be held on Saturday, February 16, 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the Brazos Center, 3232 Briarcrest Drive, Bryan. Billy Kniffen, water resource specialist with the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, will lead this informative seminar. Learn how to capture, store and use rainwater in your home and landscape. Kniffen will address topics relating to this effective water conservation tool, including: Water stewardship; Stormwater management; Reducing water demand; Passive collections (rain gardens, etc.); and Simple and complex water harvesting systems. After serving as a county Extension agent for 25 years, Kniffen is currently vice-president and education coordinator for the American Rainwater Catchment Systems Association (ARCSA). He is co-author of their manual — Rainwater Harvesting: System Planning — used in the ARCSA Accredited Professional course. He and his wife live in Menard, in a home solely dependent on rainwater. As part of the program, Kniffen will also have a fully-operational system demonstration. This seminar also offers informational exhibits for lawns, vegetable gardening, water delivery systems and the City of College Station Water Resource division. Master Gardeners will be on hand to answer gardening questions. Pre-Register to attend: $45 per person — includes handouts, snacks & sandwich lunch buffet. Registration  preferred by February 11, 2013. Information and registration form are available at www.brazosmg.com. Mail registration to: Brazos County Master Gardeners, 2619 Highway 21 West, Bryan, TX 77803. For additional information call the Brazos County office of AgriLife Extension at 979-823-0129 or email brazosmg@brazosmg.com.

La Marque: Master Gardener Elayne Kouzounis will present “Hummingbirds…The Fluttering Jewels in our Garden,” Saturday, February 16, 9 a.m.-11:30 a.m. at Galveston County AgriLife Extension Office in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (FM 519), La Marque. Elayne is an avid hummingbird enthusiast who has attended the Rockport Hummingbird Festival many times. She will present and discuss everything hummingbird. For course reservations, call 281-534-3413, ext. 12 or email GALV3@wt.net.

La Marque: Master Gardeners Stewart McAdoo and Robert Marshall will present “Honey Bees Around the Garden,” Saturday, February 16, 1 p.m.-3:00 p.m. at Galveston County AgriLife Extension Office in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (FM 519), La Marque. A presentation and discussion on the history, types, social life and hive structure of honey bees. Included will be an overview of residential honey bee keeping. For course reservations, call 281-534-3413, ext. 12 or email GALV3@wt.net.

The Woodlands: “Creating a Sense of Place,” a Gardening 101 seminar on Saturday, February 16 from 9 a.m. to noon, features Gary Clark, nature columnist; Kathy Adams Clark, professional photographer; and Brenda Beust Smith, Houston’s original Lazy Gardener. Learn how to work with the nature to add life to your landscape and avoid gardening pitfalls. With beautiful photography, Gary and Kathy reveal the natural beauty of East Texas with “Attracting Birds and Butterflies to Your Backyard.” Brenda presents “10 Commandments of Lazy Gardening,” offering tried and true tips for creating an easy care landscape. Reservations are required for the free program and book signing that will be held at The Woodlands Township Board Chambers, 2801 Technology Forest Blvd. For information, call 281-210-3800. Register on-line at Gardening 101.

Houston: Tour the working and demonstration gardens maintained by the Harris County Master Gardeners at Precinct 2, Genoa Friendship Garden, 1202 Genoa Red Bluff, Houston, from 8:30 a.m. until 11 a.m., Monday, February 18. Master Gardeners will be on hand to answer your gardening questions. A program on Tomatoes & Peppers will be offered from 9:30 - 10:30 am. Free and open to the public, children welcome.

Seabrook: Dennis Jones of Texas Parks and Wildlife will speak about the Historical "count" of Texas Prairies and Native grasses at 10 a.m., Wednesday, February 20, at The Meeting Room at Clear Lake Park (on the lakeside), 5001 NASA Parkway, Seabrook. Free and open to the public.

MARCH

Longview: The Gregg County Master Gardeners will host their annual Spring Garden and Landscape Seminar, Saturday, March 2, at the First United Methodist church, Faith Center, Whaley Street entrance, Longview, from 8 a.m. until noon. Greg Grant, horticulturist, conservationist and writer will be the speaker. Greg’s topic for the first session will be “Home Landscaping: Right Plant, Right Place.” For the second session, Greg’s topic will be “Heirloom Gardening in the South: Yesterday’s Plants for Today’s Garden.” Greg is a lecturer at Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches, a graduate from Texas A&M University, and a columnist for Texas Gardener magazine. Advance tickets are $10, available from the Gregg Co. AgriLife Extension Service or at the door for $12. For more information, call 1-903-236-8429 or visit www.gregg-tx.tamu.edu.

Huntsville: The Texas Thyme Unit of the Herb Society of America will host the second annual Herb Day at the historic Wynne Home on Saturday, March 16, 9 a.m. until -2 p.m. The event will be held on the grounds of the Wynne Home, 1438 Eleventh St., Huntsville. Master Gardener Bonney Kennedy will give a talk about growing citrus. Master Gardener Jean Marsh will demonstrate herbal pestos. A talk on growing camellias is also planned. The event will include an herb plant sale, camellia sale, herbal crafts and products, kitchen and garden vendors, art, music and food. For more information, contact Maryann Readal at mreadal@yahoo.com.

Angleton: Spring Plant Sale by Brazoria County Master Gardeners at the Brazoria County Fair Grounds, 901 S. Downing Rd, Angleton, March 23. Featured speaker at 8:00 a.m. is Heidi from Treesearch, Inc. Sales includes plants from Treesearch plus those cultivated by BCMGA. New venue and new ideas on gardening in the Brazoria County area. Sale is from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. and includes all kinds of plants for the landscape and vegetable gardening. For more information, visit http://txmg.org/brazoria.

APRIL

Nacogdoches: The SFA Gardens at Stephen F. Austin State University will host its annual Garden Gala Day Spring Plant Sale from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. Saturday, April 20, at the SFA Pineywoods Native Plant Center, 2900 Raguet St. in historic Nacogdoches. A wide variety of hard-to-find, “Texas tough” plants will be available, including Texas natives, heirlooms, tropicals, perennials, shrubs, trees, and exclusive SFA and Greg Grant introductions. Most of the plants are extensively trialed in the gardens before being offered to the public and most are produced by the SFA Gardens staff and volunteers. This popular event benefits the SFA Mast Arboretum, Pineywoods Native Plant Center, Ruby M. Mize Azalea Garden, Gayla Mize Garden, and educational programs hosted at the gardens. The educational programs at SFA Gardens reach over 15,000 students ages 1 to 100 on a yearly basis. The public is encouraged to arrive early and bring a wagon. For more information, call 936-468-4404, or visit www.sfagardens.sfasu.edu and click on “garden events” for a list of available plants.

MONTHLY MEETINGS

FIRST WEEK

Houston: The Harris County Master Gardeners meet at noon the first Tuesday of each month at the Texas AgriLife Extension, 3033 Bear Creek Drive (near the intersection of Highway 6 and Patterson Road), Houston. For additional information visit http://hcmga.tamu.edu or call 281-855-5600.

Wichita Falls: The Wichita County Master Gardener Association meets at 5:30 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 600 Scott Street, Wichita Falls, on the first Tuesday of each month. For more information, visit www.txmg.org/wichita or call 940-716-8610.

Kilgore: Northeast Texas Organic Gardeners meets at 1 p.m. on the first Wednesday of each month. For more information, call Carole Ramke at 903-986-9475.

Allen: The Allen Garden Club meets at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month, February through December, at the Allen Heritage Center, 100 E. Main St., Allen. For more information, visit www.allengardenclub.org.

Brownwood: The Brown County Master Gardeners Association meets the first Thursday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 605 Fisk Ave., Brownwood. For further information, call Mary Green Engle at 325-784-8453.

Gonzalas: Gonzales Master Gardeners Association holds their monthly meeting on the first Thursday of each month. A short program is presented. The meeting is held from noon until 1 p.m. at 1405 Conway St. (Odd Fellows Lodge). Bring a bag lunch, drinks provided. Contact AgriLife Extension Office at 830-672-8531 or e-mail gonzales@ag.tamu.edu for more information.

SECOND WEEK

Austin: Austin Organic Gardeners Club meets at 6:30 p.m. on the second Monday of each month (except December) at the Austin Area Garden Center, 2220 Barton Springs Road, Zilker Botanical Gardens in Austin. For more information, visit www.austinorganicgardeners.org.

Evant: The Evant Garden Club meets on the second Tuesday of each month at 10 a.m., usually at the bank in downtown Evant. To confirm the date, time and place of each month's meeting, call 254-471-5585.

Marion: The Guadalupe County (Schertz/Seguin) Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets on the second Tuesday of each month except July and August at The Library, 500 Bulldog, Marion. There is a plant exchange and meet-and-greet begins at 6:30 p.m. followed by the program at 7 p.m. Visitors are welcome. For more information or an application to join NPSOT visit www.npsot.org/GuadalupeCounty/ or contact guadalupecounty@npsot.org.

Quitman: The Quitman Garden Club meets at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month at the Quitman Library on E Goode Street, Quitman. It is a diverse group that welcomes all visitors.For more information, e-mail quitmangardenclub@gmail.com.

Humble: The Mercer Arboretum & Botanic Garden, 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble, hosts a Lunch Bunch the second Wednesday of each month from noon until 2 p.m. Take a sack lunch or order a box lunch from Starbucks when you call 281-443-8731 to reserve your spot. Master Gardeners and Masters Naturalists may earn CEU credits by attending.

Jacksboro: The Jacksboro Garden Club meets at 9:30 a.m. the second Wednesday of each month (except June, July and August) at the Concerned Citizens Center, 400 East Pine Street, Jacksboro. For more information, call Melinda at 940-567-6218.

Longview: The Gregg County Master Gardeners Association meets the second Wednesday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 405 E. Marshall Ave., Longview. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program preceding the business meeting. For further information call Cindy Gill at 903-236-8429 or visit www.gregg-tx.tamu.edu.

New Braunfels: The Comal Master Gardeners meet at 6 p.m. the second Wednesday of January at the GVTC Auditorium, 36101 FM 3159, New Braunfels. For additional information and meeting dates of subsequent months, call 830-620-3440.

Rockport: The Rockport Herb & Rose Study Group, founded in March 2003, meets the second Wednesday of each month at 10 a.m. at 619 N. Live Oak Street, Room 14, Rockport, to discuss all aspects of using and growing herbs, including historical uses and tips for successful propagation and cultivation. Sometimes they take field trips and have cooking demonstrations in different locations. For more information, contact Linda 361-729-6037, Ruth 361-729-8923 or Cindy 979-562-2153 or visit www.rockportherbs.org and http://rockportherbies.blogspot.com.

Beaumont: The Jefferson County Master Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the AgriLife Extension Office, 1225 Pearl Street, Suite 200, Beaumont. For more information, call 409-835-8461.

Georgetown: The Williamson County Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the Georgetown Public Library, 402 W. 8th Street. Georgetown. For additional information, contract Billye Adams at 512-863-9636 or visit http://www.npsot.org/WilliamsonCounty/default.htm.

Orange: The Orange County Master Gardeners Association holds their monthly meeting on the second Thursday of each month. A short program is presented. The meeting starts at 6:30 p.m. at the Salvation Army Bldg. cor. MLK & Strickland in Orange. Pot luck supper at 6 p.m. Visit http://txmg.org/orange for more information.

San Antonio: The San Antonio Herb Society meets at 7 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month at the San Antonio Garden Center, 3310 N. New Braunfels (corner of Funston & N. New Braunfels). For more information on programs, visit www.sanantonioherbs.org.

Angleton: The Brazoria County Master Gardeners meet at 11 a.m. on the second Friday of each month at the Brazoria County Extension Office, 21017 County Road 171, Angleton. There is a general business meeting followed by a brief educational program each month. For further information call 979-864-1558, ext.110.

College Station: The A&M Garden Club meets on the second Friday of each month during the school year at 9:30 a.m. in the training room of the College Station Waste Water Facility building at the end of North Forest Parkway, College Station. Expert speakers, plant sharing, and federated club projects help members learn about gardening in the Brazos Valley, floral design, conservation, and more. For more information, visit http://www.amgardenclub.com/.

Houston: The Spring Branch African Violet Club meets the second Saturday of each month, January through November, at 10:30am at the Copperfield Baptist Church, 8350 Highway 6 North, Houston. Call Karla at 281-748-8417 prior to attending to confirm meeting date and time.

Dallas: The Rainbow Garden Club of North Texas meets the second Sunday of each month at 2 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Meetings are held at member’s homes and garden centers around the area. For more information, visit www.RainbowGardenClub.com.

THIRD WEEK

Arlington: The Arlington Men's Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the third Monday of each month (except December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact Lance Jepson at LJepson@aol.com.

Cleburne: The Johnson County Master Gardeners meet at 2 p.m. on the third Monday of each month at McGregor House, 1628 W. Henderson, Cleburne, which includes a program and a meet & greet. For more information, call Sharon Smith at 817-894-7700.

Rockport: Monthly meetings of the Aransas/San Patricio Master Gardeners are held at 10 a.m. on the third Tuesday of each month at Texas AgriLife Extension Service - Aransas County Office, 892 Airport Rd., Rockport. For additional information, e-mail aransas-tx@tamu.edu or call 361-790-0103.

Sugar Land: The Sugar Land Garden Club meets on the third Tuesday of each month, September through November and January through April at 10 a.m. at the Sugar Land Community Center, 226 Matlage Way, Sugar Land. The club hosts a different speaker each month. For more information, visit www.sugarlandgardenclub.org.

Denton: The Denton Organic Society, a group devoted to sharing information and educating the public regarding organic principles, meets the third Wednesday of each month (except July, August and December) at the Denton Senior Center, 509 N. Bell Avenue. Meetings are free and open to the public. Meetings begin at 7 p.m. and are preceded by a social at 6:30. For more information, call 940-382-8551.

Glen Rose: The Somervell County Master Gardeners meet at 10 a.m., the third Wednesday of each month at the Somervell County AgriLife Extension office, 1405 Texas Drive, Glen Rose. Visitors are welcome. For more information, call 254-897-2809 or visit www.somervellmastergardeners.org.

Granbury: The Lake Granbury Master Gardeners meet at 1 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at the Hood County Annex 1, 1410 West Pearl Street, Granbury. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program each month preceding the business meeting. For information on topics call 817-579-3280 or visit http://www.hoodcountymastergardeners.org/.

Seabrook: The Harris County Precinct 2 Master Gardeners hold an educational program at 10 a.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at The Meeting Room at Clear Lake Park (on the Lakeside), 5001 NASA Road 1, Seabrook. The programs are free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu.

Brownwood: Brownwood Garden Club meets the third Thursday of each month, 11:30 a.m.– 1 p.m.  The club meetings are at Southside Baptist Church, 1219 Indian Creek Road, with refreshments and a speaker presentation. Visitors are welcome. For more information, email boeblingen@centex.net or call 817-454-8175).

Houston: The Native Plant Society of Texas — Houston (NPSOT-H) meets at 7:30 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except for October (4th Thursday) and December (2nd Thursday). Location varies. For locations, for more information on programs, and for information about native plants for Houston, visit http://www.npsot.org/Houston.

Rosenberg: The Fort Bend Master Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except December at the Bud O’Shieles Community Center located at 1330 Band Road, Rosenberg. For more information, call 281-341-7068 or visit www.fbmg.com.

Seguin: The Guadalupe County Master Gardeners meets at 7 p.m. the third Thursday of each month, except June and December, at the Texas AgriLife Extension Bldg. at 210 E. Live Oak, Seguin. An educational program precedes the business meeting. The public is invited to attend. For topic or other information, call 830-379-1972 or visit www.guadalupecountymastergardeners.org.

FOURTH WEEK

Atlanta: The Caddo Wildflower Chapter of Native Plants Society meets the fourth Tuesday of each month at the Horne Enterprise building in Atlanta at 7 p.m. Visitors are welcome. For additional information, contact Gene Bobo at gene.bobo@agnet.tamu.edu.

Brackenridge Park: The Native Plant Society San Antonio Chapter meets every fourth Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. in the Lions Field Adult and Senior Center, 2809 Broadway at E. Mulberry, Brackenridge Park, except August and December. Social and seed/plant exchange at 6:30 p.m. Free and open to the public. For more information, contact Bea at 210-999-7292 or visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio.

Bryan: The Brazos County Master Gardeners, a program of Texas AgriLife Extension, meet the fourth Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. at the Brazos Center, 3232 Briarcrest Drive, Bryan. There is a public gardening program at each meeting and pertinent information may be found at brazosmg.com or 979-823-0129.

Edna: The Jackson County Master Gardeners present their "Come Grown With Us" seminars on the fourth Tuesday of each month, January through October, beginning at 7 p.m. at 411 N. Wells, Edna. The seminars are free, open to the public and offer 2 CEU hours to Master Gardeners or others requiring them. For additional information, contact the Jackson County Extension Office at 361-782-3312.

Fort Worth: The Organic Garden Club of Forth Worth meets at 7 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday of each month except July and December at the Deborah Beggs Moncrief Garden Center, 3220 Botanic Blvd., Ft. Worth. Refreshments are served. For more information, call 817-263-9322 or visit www.ogcfw.webs.com.

San Antonio: The Native Plant Society of Texas San Antonio Chapter meets the fourth Tuesday of each month, except August and December, at the Lions Field Adult & Senior Center, 2809 Broadway, San Antonio. Social and plant/seed exchange at 6:30 p.m., program at 7:00 p.m. For more information, visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio or call Bea at 210-999-7292.

Houston: The Houston Chapter of the Native Prairie Association of Texas (HNPAT) meets from 7 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. the fourth Wednesday of each month at Bayland Park Community Center, 6400 Bissonnet, Houston. For more information, contact hnpat@prairies.orgrg.

Leander: The Leander Garden Club meets on the fourth Thursday of each month (except July and August) at 10:30 a.m. at the community room behind the Greater Texas Federal Credit Union,1300 N. Bell, Cedar Park, unless there is special event planned. Following a program and short business meeting, we share a pot-luck luncheon. To confirm the meeting place and time, please call president Cathy Clark-Ramsey at 512-963-4698 or email info@leandergc.org.

Dallas: The Greater Dallas Organic Garden Club meets at 7:00 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of each month at the REI, 4515 LBJ Freeway, Dallas. For more information, call 214-824-2448 or visit www.gdogc.org.

Arlington: The Arlington Organic Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the last Thursday of each month (except November and December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact David at 817-483-7746.


Texas Fruit and Vegetable Gardening

By Greg Grant

This new book incorporates Greg’s horticultural expertise along with his homespun writing style and, unlike other books on vegetable gardening, this one includes chapters on fruit, nuts and herbs along with a nice selection of family recipes.

This easy-to-follow, color-packed guide features:

  • Planting, care and harvesting information for more than 60 edibles
  • Popular vegetable selections from arugula to tomatoes
  • A variety of common and unusual fruits and herbs
  • Advice on garden planning, creating the perfect soil, watering and more!
  • It is a must have for every serious gardener in Texas and neighboring states.

$29.79 (includes tax and shipping)

Call 1-800-727-9020 or visit us online at www.texasgardener.com to order your copy today!

American Express, Discover, MasterCard and Visa accepted.


The Texas Tomato Lover's Handbook

The best thing for tomato enthusiasts since the tomato itself! William D. Adams draws on more than thirty years' experience to provide a complete, step-by-step guide to success in the tomato patch. Learn everything from soil preparation, planting, feeding, caging and watering. Liberally sprinkled with the author's easy humor and illustrated with his own excellent photographs, the must have book has everything you'll need to assure a bumper crop! 189 pages. Lots of color photographs!

Only $26.69 for Seeds readers! Free shipping!

To take advantage of this special offer, call toll-free 1-800-727-9020.

American Express, Discover, MasterCard and Visa accepted.



Paperback edition.


Kindle edition.

NOW AVAILABLE IN PAPERBACK!
In Greg's Garden: A Pineywoods Perspective on Gardening, Nature and Family

By Greg Grant
Foreword by Chris S. Corby

An intimate and personal exploration of the life of one of Texas’ most beloved gardeners, In Greg’s Garden: A Pineywoods Perspective on Gardening, Nature and Family gathers in a single volume the first 10 years of Greg Grant’s columns from Texas Gardener magazine, and is amply illustrated with Grant’s own full-color photography.

Revised and updated from their original publication, these 60 essays reveal the heart and soul of a seventh-generation native Texan who has devoted his entire life to gardening, nature and family. With degrees in floriculture and horticulture from Texas A&M University and extensive hands-on experience as a horticulturist with the Texas Agricultural Extension Service, Stephen F. Austin State University, Mercer Arboretum and San Antonio Botanical Gardens, Grant has successfully introduced dozens of plants to the Texas nursery industry, all while maintaining long-held family property and renovating the homes of his ancestors in Arcadia, Texas.

In Greg’s Garden: A Pineywoods Perspective on Gardening, Nature and Family is a must-read for every Texas gardener.

$36.74 (includes shipping and sales tax)

Remit payment to: TG Books • PO Box 9005 • Waco, TX 76714
www.TexasGardener.com
or call Toll-Free 1-800-727-9020

American Express, Visa, MasterCard and Discover accepted

The previous text-only edition of In Greg’s Garden: A Pineywoods Perspective on Gardening, Nature and Family, containing the first nine years of Greg Grant’s column, is still available for Kindle from Amazon.com.


Wish you'd saved them?

Are you missing an important issue of Texas Gardener? Or, perhaps, just tired of thumbing through stacks of back issues looking for the tips and techniques you need to make your garden grow? These new CDs provide easy access to all six issues of

volume 20 (November/December 2000 through September/October 2001),
volume 21
(November/December 2001 through September/October 2002),
volume 22
(November/December 2002 through September/October 2003),
volume 23
(November/December 2003 through September/October 2004),
volume 24 (November/December 2004 through September/October 2005),
volume 25 (November/December 2005 through September/October 2006),
volume 26 (November/December 2006 through September/October 2007),
volume 27 (November/December 2007 through September/October 2008),
volume 28 (November/December 2008 through September/October 2009),
volume 29 (November/December 2009 through September/October 2010),
volume 30 (November/December 2010 through September/October 2011) and
volume 31 (November/December 2011 through September/October 2012)*.

$16.99 per CD includes tax and shipping

Order by calling 1-800-727-9020.

(American Express, Discover, MasterCard and Visa accepted.)

*Other volumes will be available soon.


Fiber row cover valuable year-round

Grow-Web encourages plant growth and development, and also provides protection from insects, birds, diseases and frosts. It is also air and water permeable and allows for ventilation. Grow-Web provides excellent protection to seedlings when applied directly to the seedbed.

$31.88 per 12.3’ x 32.8’ roll (includes shipping!)

Order by calling 1-800-727-9020 or order on-line.

(American Express, Discover, MasterCard and Visa accepted.)


Become a Texas Gardener fan on Facebook

Become a fan of Texas Gardener magazine on Facebook. See what we're up to at http://www.facebook.com/pages/Texas-Gardener-Magazine/301356291835?ref=nf.


Texas Gardener’s Seeds is published weekly. © Suntex Communications, Inc. 2013. All rights reserved. You may forward this publication to your friends and colleagues if it is sent in its entirety. No individual part of this newsletter may be reproduced in any manner without prior written permission from the publisher.

Missed an issue? Back issues of Texas Gardener’s Seeds are available at www.texasgardener.com/newsletters.

Publisher: Chris S. Corby ● Editor: Michael Bracken

Texas Gardener’s Seeds, P.O. Box 9005, Waco, Texas 76714 ● www.TexasGardener.com