March 13, 2013

Welcome to Texas Gardener’s Seeds, the weekly newsletter for Texas gardeners. Please do not reply to this e-mail because the sending address is not monitored. See the bottom of this newsletter for information on how to subscribe, unsubscribe, or contact the editor.


 

 

Outlook for peaches and other fruit crops good thanks to colder weather

By Robert Burns
Texas AgriLife Extension Service

Because of a mild early winter, it was touch-and-go for Texas fruit crops for a while, but everything now looks just peachy, according to a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service expert.

“We’re very optimistic right now,” said Dr. Larry Stein, AgriLife Extension horticulturist in Uvalde who works mainly with pecans, fruits, grapes and vegetable crops.

Fruit trees and many fruit crops require cold weather to grow, flower, and develop properly, Stein explained. This time is called “chilling hours” and is usually defined as the number of hours in a season when the temperatures fall below 45 degrees. Different varieties require different amounts of chilling hours.

“We were sucking air for a while on chilling hours,” he said. “We were really concerned. In fact, in the Hill Country I think they’re going to end up with 750 (chill hours) and probably be okay, but there were actually a lot of growers who were applying Dormex.”

Dormex is a growth regulator that helps overcome insufficient chilling hours, Stein said.

Peaches are big business in the Hill Country, according to AgriLife Extension horticulturists, being primarily concentrated in the Fredericksburg area and surrounding counties. By some accounts, Gillespie County alone produces 40 percent of all the peaches grown in Texas.

There was also some concern about fruit trees blooming early, and therefore being subject to damage by a hard frost, Stein said.

“But we had a lot of cool nights, and the days have not really been that warm,” he said. “They started blooming early, but they slowed down, and this is March 5, and we think we’re going to be okay there too.”

Of course, weather is often unpredictable, he noted.

“Right now, we’re okay, but we could get everything out and then have a freeze in April. You never know,” Stein said. “A lot of old-timers say you’ve got to get past Easter, but Easter comes early this year in late March.”

There are not many apricots or cherries grown in Texas, but there are large amounts of blueberries grown, he said.

“But they (blueberry growers) should be okay too, as long as they did their homework on variety selection,” Stein said.

According the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Texas total peach production was 4,900 tons in 2009, down from 7,900 tons in 2008. The 38 percent reduction in 2009 was due to an early freeze in April that wiped out some producers’ entire crop.

More information on the current Texas drought and wildfire alerts can be found on the AgriLife Extension Agricultural Drought Task Force website at http://agrilife.tamu.edu/drought/.

AgriLife Extension district reporters compiled the following summaries for the week of Feb. 26 to March 4.

The 12 Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service Districts

Central: High winds and no rain resulted in dry conditions. Vegetable producers were planting some crops under plastic. Wheat and oat pastures were hanging on with some disease issues. Growth of winter pastures slowed due to the lack of moisture. Corn and sunflower growers were planting. Some were planting sorghum. Fruit and ornamental trees were blooming early. Stock-tank water was very low.

Coastal Bend: The drought continued with no forecast of rain anytime in the near future. Some farmers were planting in soils with very limited moisture; maybe enough to germinate seed but not enough to sustain growth. Livestock producers continued to reduce herds as grazing was very limited. Temperatures were below normal with very high winds that further dried out soils and caused dust storms.

East: The region received little to no rain. High winds dried out soils. Cattle were in good condition, as were winter forages, which meant producers could reduce feeding hay. Vegetable growers were planting onions and potatoes. Feral hog activity continued.

Far West: A cold front came through, but the region received little to no moisture with its passing. High winds eroded more sandy fields and dried soils. Otherwise, weather was mild for late February, with daytime highs in the 50s to 70s, and nighttime lows in the 20s and 30s. Lamb producers planned to start shearing in mid-March. Farmers continued to prepare ground for spring planting.

North: The region saw cooler temperatures but no rain. Winds somewhat dried out topsoils, leaving soil moisture mostly short to adequate. Small grains and winter pastures were growing. Some producers were able to apply fertilizer between the rainfalls a couple of weeks ago, and winter wheat was coming along nicely. Farmers began planting corn. Pasture and rangelands conditions varied widely — from poor to fair to good. Livestock were in fair to good condition. Producers fed hay throughout the winter, and as a result, livestock were in good condition. Hay supplies seemed to be holding up. Stock-water ponds were low.

Panhandle: The region received more moisture in the form of snow along with high winds early in the week, with higher temperatures by week’s end. Snow accumulations ranged from a trace to as much as 19 inches. Producers with stocker cattle were challenged by the snow and wind trying to get hay and water to cattle. Soil-moisture levels were mostly short to adequate. Wheat was mostly in poor condition, but was beginning to improve with the recent moisture and warmer weather. Rangeland and pasture continued to be mostly in poor to very poor condition.

Rolling Plains: The recent snow and rain replenished soil-moisture levels enough to make farmers happy. Some counties received some rain followed 1.5 to 8 inches of snow, which improved winter wheat and rye pastures almost overnight. Encouraged by the precipitation, cotton producers listed fields and marked off rows. Livestock were in fair to good condition, with producers continuing to provide supplemental feed. However, many lakes and livestock tanks still were critically low. Most peach trees had not yet bloomed.

South: Nights continued to be cool and days mild, with low humidity and persistently strong winds, all of which caused havoc on rangeland, pastures and crops. Frio County farmers had to stop planting corn due to the strong winds. Some fields had to be replanted. Potato fields also suffered wind damage. In McMullen County, winds in excess of 40 mph rapidly dried out rangeland and pastures, and ranchers had to increase supplemental feeding. Cattle in that area were under nutritional stress, which was worsened with the onset of spring calving. Jim Wells County farmers were planting crops under dry conditions, hoping for rain. High winds there blew soils, further limiting forage availability for livestock. In Maverick County, winter oats and some wheat were doing well under irrigation. There were wind gusts of up to 60 mph that lasted for nearly two days. The drought continued, and only livestock yards were maintaining cattle herds of any size. All other Maverick County ranchers have sold most of their cattle. In Zavala County, spinach and cabbage harvesting was very active. Extreme dry conditions continued there, stressing dryland wheat and oats. Onions were progressing well, with pre-plant irrigation very active. Also in that area, some producers planned to begin planting corn and sorghum soon. In Hidalgo County, harvesting continues on vegetables, citrus and sugarcane. Starr County farmers finished planting spring row crops. In Willacy County, sorghum planting, which began about three weeks ago, remained at a standstill because of extremely dry soils.

South Plains: Blizzard conditions in the north part of the region closed schools, businesses and highways. Snow amounts varied, with Lubbock County receiving about 4 inches while the more northern counties got 8 to 12 inches. Winds as high as 50 to 60 mph caused deep drifts. Fields with little or no cover crops or wind-opposing furrows did not retain much snow. In those areas, most of the snow ended up in ditches and piled along buildings and fencerows. Consequently, although soil-moisture levels were somewhat increased, that improvement could be very spotty. Warm weather followed the storms and the snow was quickly melting. Bailey County reported some stocker cattle losses due to the extreme conditions. Most of the southern part of the district received only a light dusting of snow or scattered showers along with blowing dirt. Rangeland and pastures were mostly in fair condition, with some isolated areas reported in good condition. Cattle were mostly in fair to good condition with supplemental feeding continuing. Producers proceeded with field preparations as conditions allowed. The snow moisture was welcome, but significant rains were still needed to bring the soil profile up to levels that will support this year’s crops.

Southeast: Dry and cold conditions hurt winter annuals and dried soils. In Burleson County, farmers began planting corn with good progress because of dry conditions. Pastures were dry with limited cool-season legume and ryegrass growth. Bermuda grass pastures and hay fields broke dormancy and began to grow because of warm temperatures. In Orange County, freezing temperatures and frost held back spring-forage growth.

Southwest: Extremely dry and windy conditions persisted. Rangeland and pastures continued to deteriorate. Wheat and oats badly needed rain. Ranchers continued supplemental feeding of livestock. Corn planting was ongoing. Farmers began applying fertilizer and weed control on coastal Bermuda grass fields. Small trees and brush were budding, but growth was slow and weak. Lambing and calving was under way in some counties. Burn bans were in effect.

West Central: Weather continued to be dry and windy with mild days and cold nights, which had a negative effect on livestock, rangeland, wildlife and crops. The danger of wildfire was high. Winter brush-control efforts were under way. Dry soils were expected to have a negative impact on spring and summer crop planting. Winter wheat was maturing fast and turning brown. Rangeland and pastures continued to decline. Some warm-season grasses tried to break dormancy, but frosts set them back. No winter grazing was available, and ranchers continued supplemental feeding of livestock. Stock-tank water levels dropped further, with some having gone completely dry.


Lawn renewal and renovation tips to create a perfect lawn this season

By Melinda Myers
Gardening expert, TV/radio host & columnist

The extreme heat and drought of 2012 was hard on lawns and gardens. Many gardeners are facing a blank slate of bare soil, masses of dead patches that were once lawn or a bit of grass interspersed in a sea of weeds.

Start this spring to renovate or improve your weather-worn lawn. Remember that water is critical to get newly seeded and sodded lawns to survive. So be prepared to help nature along with your lawn’s recovery.

Evaluate the damage. Then use the checklist below to guide you to the best course of action to aid your ailing lawn.

If your lawn is more than 60 percent weeds or bare soil you may want to start over. Use this opportunity to create a great foundation for growing a healthy lawn. Kill off the existing vegetation, add several inches of organic matter such as compost or peat moss and a low nitrogen slow release fertilizer into the top 6 to 8 inches of soil, and rake smooth.

Select more drought tolerant grasses like rhizomatous (turf-type) tall fescues, buffalo grass, and Habiturf native lawn mix. Make sure the grass is suited to your climate and plant according to the label. Then sow the seeds, lightly rake and mulch or lay sod. Water often enough to keep the soil moist until the seeds sprout or the sod roots into the soil below. Then water thoroughly when the top few inches of soil are crumbly, but slightly moist to encourage deep roots.

Fertilize new, existing and stressed lawns with a low nitrogen slow release fertilizer. It won’t harm stressed lawns, young seedlings or newly laid sod. It will encourage slow steady growth.

Mow high to encourage deeply rooted grass that is more drought-tolerant and pest-resistant. And mow often, removing only a third of the total height. And leave these short clippings on the lawn. They return moisture, nutrients, and organic matter to the soil.

Core aerate lawns with more than one half an inch of thatch, those growing in compacted soils, or before overseeding. By removing plugs of soil you break through the thatch and create channels for water and fertilizer to reach the grass roots.

Proper maintenance and a bit of cooperation from nature will help transform your lawn from an eyesore to an asset in your landscape.

Nationally known gardening expert, TV/radio host, author & columnist Melinda Myers has more than 30 years of horticulture experience and has written more 20 gardening books, including Can’t Miss Small Space Gardening. She hosts the nationally syndicated Melinda’s Garden Moment segments which air on nearly 100 TV and radio stations throughout the U.S. and Canada. Melinda has a master’s degree in horticulture, is a certified arborist and was a horticulture instructor with tenure. Learn more at www.melindamyers.com.


Gardening questions answered  

Have a gardening question? You can now call a Johnson County Master Gardener for an answer. Every Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., a Master Gardener will be available to take calls at the Johnson County Extension office. Just phone 817-556-6370 and ask to speak to a Master Gardener. If a solution to your gardening problem can’t be provided on-the-spot, your question will be put to more research. Johnson County Master Gardeners have a wealth of resources at hand. Made possible by the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, the Master Gardener Program is designed to increase a community’s exposure to horticultural information and improve quality of life through horticultural projects.


 

The compost heap
Yaupon potential fire hazard

"I attended a lecture given by a member of the Texas Forestry Dept.," writes Sandra Williams. "The topic was fire-proofing your yard and garden. We were told that yaupon is a highly flammable plant and should not be planted close to any structures which could catch fire. When you recommend yaupon ("Did you know," Seeds, March 6, 2013) (I like it too) I wish you would also add that information. It would be the responsible thing to do and I'm sure someone in the forestry service could verify what I am saying."


 

Gardening tips

Salvias represent a large group of perennial flowers that make excellent choices for spring through fall color.

Have a favorite gardening tip you’d like to share? Texas Gardener’s Seeds is seeking brief gardening tips from Texas gardeners to use in future issues. If we publish your tip in Seeds, we will send you a free Texas Gardener 2013 Planning Guide & Calendar. Please send your tips of 50 words or less to the editor at: Gardening Tips.


Did you know...

Solarization is the easiest, chemical free way to clear an area of vegetation for a new garden, planting bed or native turf area. Just lay an appropriate size sheet of black plastic over the area in hot weather (the hotter, the better) and leave it until the vegetation underneath is cooked and lifeless. Then you are ready replant with the desired selections.


Upcoming garden events

If you would like your organization’s events included in "Upcoming Garden Events" or would like to make a change to a listed event, please contact us at Garden Events. To ensure inclusion in this column, please provide complete details at least three weeks prior to the event.

MARCH

Austin: Extended hours and special events for spring occur during Wildflower Days, the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center’s season of blooms. The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center is located at The University of Texas at Austin, 4801 La Crosse Ave, Austin. From Monday, March 11, through Friday, May 31, the center grounds are open daily 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., with general hours extended on Thursdays until 8 p.m. for the spring season. Wildflower Days celebrates the 2013 spring season with events for all ages, including: New Nature Art Exhibits, Through Memorial Day, May 27— kinetic sculptor Jim La Paso brings giant, wind-driven metal sculptures of wildflowers and other subjects to the center’s grounds, alongside indoor nature exhibits by Shou Ping, master of 3-D watercolors, and Denise Counley’s plein air watercolors in The Store; Go Native U, Through early June — a Nature in Art series is among new spring educational offerings, with individual classes and sustainable gardening series also available; Spring Plant Sale & Gardening Festival, Saturday and Sunday, April 13 and 14 — gardening tips from experts and plenty of trees, bushes, wildflowers and other drought-tolerant native plants for purchase; Wild Night Out, Thursday, May 2 — enjoy music, wine and appetizers. Meet artists who donated works for this year’s Silent Art Auction and bid on their works in advance; Wildflower Gala & Silent Art Auction, Friday, May 3 — the most fun — and most sustainable — garden party ever; National Wildflower Week Photo Exhibit, Monday, May 6, through Sunday, May 12 — Texas Highways and the Wildflower Center present a portfolio of amazing wildflower photographs; Gardens on Tour, Saturday, May 11 — a tour of five private native gardens featuring native plant plus the beautiful landscapes at the Wildflower Center on Mother’s Day weekend. For more information, call 512-232-0100 or visit http://www.wildflower.org. To learn about onsite activities beyond wildflower viewing, visit http://www.wildflower.org/activities. A new Admission Kiosk near the front entry cistern offers on-site details. Admission fees at new Kiosk: $9 adults, $7 seniors and students, $3 children, and free for members, children under 5.

Humble: Mercer Arboretum & Botanic Gardens, 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble, will hold March Mart Volunteer Training, Wednesday, March 13, 10 a.m.-11:30 a.m. and Saturday, March 16, 9 a.m.-10:30 a.m. Attend one of these sessions and join in the fun by volunteering at this lively annual plant sale. New and experienced volunteers learn about the March Mart process and what to expect at the event. This class is required for ticket writers, cashiers, gate monitors, and wagon masters. Call 281-443-8731 for reservations.

Humble: Mercer Arboretum & Botanic Gardens, 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble, will present March Mart Preview, Wednesday, March 13, noon-2 p.m. and Saturday, March 16, 10:30 a.m.-noon. This annual PowerPoint program will whet your gardening appetite for the biggest and best fund-raising plant sale in the gulf coast area. Plant guides will be available at the Saturday talk to plan your garden purchases. Call 281-443-8731 for reservations.

Austin: “Understanding Soil and Soil Amendments” will be presented from 10 a.m. until noon, Thursday, March 14, at Travis County AgriLife Extension Office, 1600 B Smith Rd., Austin. Get to know your soil so you can improve its ability to retain moisture and improve plant growth. Your soil may be blocking vital elements your plants need to grow. Ascertain how and when to add missing elements to improve plant health and production. Learn the type of soil on your property and its corresponding strengths and weakness. (Bring a cup of your soil in a plastic bag and a glass jar with lid.) Discover changes you can make to improve the soil structure and water storage capacity. Organic matter, cover crops, soil microorganism and mulching will be discussed. This class is part of The Green Thumb series. Registration required at https://agriliferegister.tamu.edu or by phone 979-845-2604. Keyword Search: Green Thumb. One class is $15, with price discounts for signing up for 3 or more classes at the same time. The class is limited to 40 people. It is presented by the Travis County Master Gardeners, a volunteer arm of the Texas AgriLife Extension Service in Travis County.

Dallas: “Vegetable Garden-Spring” will be presented from 10 a.m. until noon,  March 14, at 17360 Coit Road, Dallas. This program teaches homeowners the proper time to germinate spring vegetable seeds and/or when to transplant spring vegetables into their vegetable garden. It also teaches proper soil preparation, insect, disease and weed. For more information and to register, please visit http://dallas.tamu.edu or email urbanwater@tamu.edu.

San Antonio: Learn about Elder, the 2013 herb of the year, March 14, 6:30 p.m. at the San Antonio Garden Center, 3310 N. New Braunfels, San Antonio. This meeting was postponed from January. Learn from people who know the most about herb gardening, cooking, sniffing, crafting and infusing...anything and everything is herbal. For more information, visit www.sanantonioherbs.org Free and open to the public.

Ft. Worth: A lecture and demonstration of composting and compost tea is offered by the Tarrant County Master Gardeners Association (TCMGA) Saturday, March 16, 10 a.m.-noon, at the TCMGA demonstration garden at the Fort Worth Resource Connection. The Resource Connection is located off Campus Dr., north from I-20 in Ft. Worth. The class will be at the garden pavilion. Class fee is $5 or $70 with a shepherd’s bin composter. To register and for more information/directions, contact Billie Hammack at blhammack@ag.tamu.edu or call 817-884-1296.

Ft. Worth: Learn prevention techniques for West Nile Virus from Tarrant County Master Gardener Jaime Hart on Saturday, March 16, 1-3 p.m. at Fort Worth’s Resource Connection, Building 2300, Mesquite Room, 2300 Circle Drive, Ft. Worth. The Resource Connection is located off Campus Dr., north of I-20. Fee is $5. Class limit is 40. To register and for more information/directions, contact Billie Hammack at blhammack@ag.tamu.edu or call 817-884-1296.

Hempstead: Peckerwood Garden Conservation Foundation will be open for garden tours and plant sales March 16, 17, April 6, 7 and May 11, 12. Garden Tours are $10 per person, and are scheduled for 1 and 3 p.m. each day. Students over 12 are admitted free with student ID. Due to the nature of the garden, no children under 12 will be permitted unless carried by an adult. Please check the website for cancellation notices due to inclement weather. Garden-grown plants, many of which are not commonly available from local nurseries, will be on sale during open weekends. The Plant Sale runs from noon to 5 p.m. Located just south of the Waller County Fairgrounds in Hempstead on the west side of Hwy 359, and just north of FM 334, the garden is easy to access from Hwy 290 or I-10. Further information about Peckerwood Garden may be found at www.peckerwoodgarden.org or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/peckerwoodgarden.

Huntsville: The Texas Thyme Unit of the Herb Society of America will host the second annual Herb Day at the historic Wynne Home on Saturday, March 16, 9 a.m. until -2 p.m. The event will be held on the grounds of the Wynne Home, 1438 Eleventh St., Huntsville. Master Gardener Bonney Kennedy will give a talk about growing citrus. Master Gardener Jean Marsh will demonstrate herbal pestos. A talk on growing camellias is also planned. The event will include an herb plant sale, camellia sale, herbal crafts and products, kitchen and garden vendors, art, music and food. For more information, contact Maryann Readal at mreadal@yahoo.com.

La Marque: Galveston County Master Gardener Herman Auer, propagation specialist, will present “Grafting Your Own Fruit Trees” from 9 a.m. until 11 a.m., Saturday, March 16, at Galveston County AgriLife Extension Office in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (FM 519), La Marque. The two grafting methods presented will be T-bud grafting, and the more commonly used wedge grafting. NOTE: Class is limited to 32 persons participating. You must pre-register in order to attend. For course reservations, call 281-534-3413, ext. 12 or email GALV3@wt.net.

San Antonio: On Saturday, March 16, 10:30-noon, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service Horticulturist David Rodriguez will present a free Earth-Kind Educational Seminar "Lawn Basics 101" at Schulz Nursery, 3700 Broadway, San Antonio. Master Gardeners who attend will receive 1.5 CEU credits. For more information, contact Angel Torres at 210-467-6575.

Marion: On Saturday, Sunday, March 17, at 2 p.m., Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service Horticulturist David Rodriguez will present a free Earth-Kind Educational Seminar "Lawn Basics 101" at Schulz Nursery, 100 Huebinger, Marion. Master Gardeners who attend will receive 1.5 CEU credits. For more information, contact Angel Torres at 210-467-6575.

Lufkin: Dr. David Creech, Director of SFA Mast Arboretum and Ruby Mize Azalea Garden, will present “Best Native Plants for East Texas” on Monday, March 18, 6:30 p.m. at Angelina County AgriLife Extension Office, 2201 S. Medford Drive, Lufkin. Admission is $10. Door prizes and refreshments provided. Hosted by Angelina Master Gardeners and Angelina Extension. Call 936-634-6414 for information.

Houston: Tour the working and demonstration gardens maintained by the Harris County Master Gardeners at Precinct 2, from 8:30-11:00 a.m., Monday, March 18, at Genoa Friendship Garden, 1202 Genoa Red Bluff, Houston. Master Gardeners will be on hand to answer your gardening questions, and a program on Propagation will be offered from 9:30-10:30 a.m. This event is free and open to the public; children welcome!

La Marque: Master Gardener Linda Brown will present “Vermiculture-Worm Castings for Your Garden, 6:30 p.m. until 8 p.m., Tuesday, March 19, at Galveston County AgriLife Extension Office in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (FM 519), La Marque. Details on how to build your own worm box, where to get your worms, how to care for your worms, and how-to’s of harvesting the castings and using them in your garden will be topics covered in the program. For course reservations, call 281-534-3413, ext. 12 or email GALV3@wt.net.

San Antonio: Bexar County Master Gardeners will meet on Wednesday, March 20, at 3355 Cherry Ridge Drive, Suite 208, San Antonio. The social begins at 6 p.m., followed at 6:30 p.m. with the presentation "Fire & Water: Ideas to Incorporate into Your Landscape this Spring," which is open to the public and is free. BCMG's own specialists will provide valuable information on fire-wise safety landscaping and water-wise landscaping. For more information, contact Lisa Nixon at lisa.nixon@bexarcountymastergardeners.org or Vince Vita at vince.vita@bexarcountymastergardeners.org.

Seabrook: Evan Siemann, a professor at Rice University, will present “Invasive Trees in Our Area,” at 10 a.m., Wednesday, March 20, at The Meeting Room at Clear Lake Park (on the lakeside), 5001 NASA Parkway, Seabrook.

Ft. Worth: How to conserve water in the urban environment is the focus of the Texas Water Star Conference, Thursday, March 21, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at Fort Worth’s Resource Connection, Building 2300, 2300 Circle Drive. The conference is sponsored by Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service-Tarrant County. Talks include state and local water issues and soil preparation, plant selection, landscape design and landscape management for water conservation. Cost is $55 if received by March 15 and $70 after. The conference qualifies for CEU credits. Complete conference and registration information is available at the Tarrant County Master Gardener Association website, www.tarrantmg.org.

Nacogdoches: The SFA Gardens at Stephen F. Austin State University will host the monthly Theresa and Les Reeves Lecture Series at 7 p.m. Thursday, March 21, in the Agriculture Building, Room 110, at 1924 Wilson Drive. LSU Horticulturist Ed Bush will present “Grow Your Garden and Enjoy a Cup of Tea.” Bush is an associate professor in Ornamental Horticulture in the Louisiana State University School of Plant, Environmental, and Soil Sciences in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. His areas of specialization and research include ornamental horticulture, commercial nursery crops, water quality, irrigation management, and stress physiology. Dr. Bush received his B.S. from Southeastern Louisiana University and his M.S. and Ph.D. from Louisiana State University. The Theresa and Les Reeves Garden Lecture Series is normally held the third Thursday of each month at the Arthur Temple College of Forestry and Agriculture’s SFA Mast Arboretum. A rare-plant raffle will be held after the program. The lecture is free and open to the public, but donations to the Theresa and Les Reeves lecture series endowed fund are always appreciated. For more information, call (936) 468-1832 or e-mail ggrantgardens@yahoo.com.

Seguin: Guadalupe County Master Gardeners will meet at 7 p.m., Thursday, March 21, in the AgriLife Extension Bldg., 210 East Live Oak, Seguin. Michael Warriner, a member of Texas Parks and Wildlife, will talk about the Role of the Bumble Bee in Nature. Meetings are free and open to the public. For more information visit www.guadalupecountymastergardeners.org or call at 830-303-3889.

Humble: Mercer Arboretum & Botanic Gardens, 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble, will present March Mart, Friday, March 22, 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. and Saturday, March 23, 8 a.m. - 2 p.m. Brought to you by volunteers at Mercer Arboretum & Botanic Gardens and The Mercer Society; this is the place to find all your year-round garden plants. Special treats also entice the discerning plant collector! Whether you are new to gardening, new to the Houston area, or very experienced there is a new treasure awaiting the perfect spot in your heart and garden. Knowledgeable volunteers will inspire you with their amazing plant options. The Members Only Plant Sale is Thursday, March 21; call 281-443-8731 for details.

Round Top: The 18th annual Herbal Forum will be held Friday, March 22, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. and Saturday, March 23, 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m. on the grounds of Festival Hill Festival Institute at Jaster Road just north of Round Top off Hwy. 237. The plant sale will offer many seldom-found herbs and other garden plants well adapted to South Central Texas. For additional information, visit www.herbsocietypioneer.org.

San Antonio: The San Antonio Garden Center's 25th Annual Spring Plant Sale will be held from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m., March 22 and 23, at 3310 N. New Braunfels, San Antonio. Admission is free. For additional information, call 210-824-9981.

Angleton: Spring Plant Sale by Brazoria County Master Gardeners at the Brazoria County Fair Grounds, 901 S. Downing Rd, Angleton, March 23. Featured speaker at 8:00 a.m. is Heidi from Treesearch, Inc. Sales includes plants from Treesearch plus those cultivated by BCMGA. New venue and new ideas on gardening in the Brazoria County area. Sale is from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. and includes all kinds of plants for the landscape and vegetable gardening. For more information, visit http://txmg.org/brazoria.

Austin: The Green Corn Project Spring Dig-ins will take place over three weekends in March and April to install and refurbish vegetable gardens for the underserved communities in Austin. Participating in a dig-in is a great way to share gardening knowledge or learn to garden while helping to bring nourishing food to others. The three weekends are: March 23/24, April 6/7, and April 13/14. For more information and to register, visit http://www.greencornproject.org/dig-ins.

Burnet: The 15th Annual Hill Country Lawn & Garden Show, sponsored by the Highland Lakes Master Gardeners Association in conjunction with the Burnet Co. AgriLife Extension Service, will be held on Saturday, March 23, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Burnet Community Center, 401 E. Jackson St., Burnet. Vendors feature plants for every garden, including native plants, exotic plants, herbs, vegetables, succulents and houseplants. The latest in lawn/garden equipment and yard decorations are also available for purchase. There will be two speakers: at 10 a.m. Richard Ashton, author of several books and a frequent contributor to Texas Gardener magazine, will present "Growing Fruit in the South," and at 2 p.m. George Cates will speak about "Creating Diverse, Drought Tolerant Native Outdoor Living Spaces." The Master Gardeners will have demonstrations, and there will be a special children’s area. Raffle tickets will be sold for a garden-themed quilt and many other prizes. Admission is free. For additional information, contact Val Klaudt, Chairperson, at 512-588-0696 or visit http://www.yantislakesidegardens.com/mghome/show.

Gonzales: The Gonzales Master Gardener 3rd Annual Plant Sale will be held Saturday, March 23, at Texas Heroes Square from 8:30 a.m. until 1 p.m. Hundreds of plants will be available for purchase propagated and grown by the master gardeners as well as other local growers. Master Gardeners will be present to answer questions, offer suggestions, and give advice on the various plants being sold. Other activities include a silent auction and food and drink will be available for purchase. Proceeds from the silent auction and the sale of plants will be used to continue improvements at the Eggleston House Children’s Garden, 623 Fair Street, and other ongoing community projects and educational programs. For more information, contact Cindy Turner at 830-263-1363.

Houston/Ft. Worth: A total of 10 Texas gardeners will share their private gardens with the public in 2013 through the Garden Conservancy’s Open Days program, America’s only national private garden-visiting program. Open Days in Texas take place on the following dates. Saturday, March 23: Visit six private gardens open to the public in Houston, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Special highlights include a loggia with hand-painted tiles and terra cotta floor, a unique English country garden, classic southern landscape elements and plant choices, a stately Live Oak dominating an Arts & Crafts style property, and a xeriscaped garden. Sunday, October 13: Visit four private gardens open in Fort Worth, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Features include a country estate with formal spaces and an organic orchard, an urban garden using earth-friendly methods and native plants, sculptural pieces and unusual container plantings, and a cottage garden focused around a fountain and large planting beds. Each of these Open Days Program dates is self-guided and no reservations are required. A $5 admission fee collected at each garden supports the national preservation work of the Garden Conservancy. The Open Days program features hundreds of magnificent spaces not normally open to the public. From April through October, garden hosts across the country welcome the opportunity to learn and exchange gardening ideas, and give the public access to explore and enjoy their private gardens. For a complete list of the more than 300 private gardens participating in eighteen states, visit the Garden Conservancy and its Open Days program online at www.opendaysprogram.org or call toll-free weekdays, 1-888-842-2442. The 2013 Open Days Directory ($21.95 including shipping and handling) is the only comprehensive source for details on the 2013 season. The Directory provides descriptions, visiting dates and hours, and driving directions to each private garden. The Directory also includes one free admission ticket to any private garden participating in the program, a $5 value. To purchase a Directory or to join the Garden Conservancy as a member and receive a free copy, call 1-888-842-2442 or visit www.opendaysprogram.org.

Ft. Worth: Make and take a clay pot wreath at a class sponsored by the Tarrant County Master Gardener Association, Saturday, March 23, 10 a.m.-noon at Fort Worth’s Resource Connection, Building 2300, Mesquite Room, 2300 Circle Drive, Ft. Worth. The Resource Connection is located off Campus Dr., north of I-20. Fee is $30. Class limit is 20. To register and for more information/directions, contact Billie Hammack at blhammack@ag.tamu.edu or call 817-884-1296.

Ft. Worth: Learn about perennials at a lecture and tour, Saturday, March 23, 1 – 3 p.m., sponsored by Tarrant County Master Gardener Association. The class will be at Fort Worth’s Resource Connection, Building 2300, Magnolia Room, 2300 Circle Drive, Ft. Worth. The tour will be at the nearby TCMGA demonstration garden. The Resource Connection is located off Campus Dr, north of I-20. Fee is $5. Class limit is 40. To register and for more information/directions, contact Billie Hammack at blhammack@ag.tamu.edu or call 817-884-1296.

Dallas: In celebration of national “Fix a Leak Week”, the Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center in Dallas, in partnership with the US EPA Region 6, and the City of Dallas Water Utilities is hosting a public grand opening of the first WaterSense labeled home in the Dallas/Ft Worth region. On March 23, from 1 p.m. until 4 p.m. the newly renovated home will be open for visitors. The home will serve as a working model that demonstrates to visitors just how easy water conservation can be. Both indoors and out, the WaterSense labeled home provides hands-on learning opportunities in areas such as hot water on demand systems, WaterSense labeled fixtures, water-efficient landscaping and irrigation systems, rainwater harvesting and rain garden design. The home also includes upgrades utilizing renewable and energy efficient products for the flooring, counter tops, lighting and appliances. According to the US EPA, WaterSense labeled homes saves a family of four 50,000 gallons a year by using 20% less water than a typical home. Texas AgriLife’s WaterSense labeled home is located on the AgriLife campus at 17360 Coit Road, Dallas, at the intersection of Coit and McCallum Blvd. The event will also include food vendors, live radio and television broadcasts and education/information booths. All are welcome to attend. For more information please visit us http://dallas.tamu.edu or email urbanwater@tamu.edu.

La Marque: Galveston County Master Gardener Susan Roth will present “Drip Irrigation-Easy and Efficient” from 6:30 p.m. until 8:30 p.m., Tuesday, March 26, at Galveston County AgriLife Extension Office in Carbide Park,4102 Main Street (FM 519), La Marque. Learn how to design, install and maintain a drip irrigation system. Drip irrigation is not only highly efficient but is also inexpensive and an easy project for do-it-yourself individuals. For course reservations, call 281-534-3413, ext. 12 or email GALV3@wt.net.

San Antonio: Tuesday, March 26, 6:30-8:30 pm, visit with Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service Horticulturist David Rodriguez during the Backyard Gardening Series presentation "Having a Successful Spring Vegetable Garden." This presentation is open to the public and will be held at 3355 Cherry Ridge Drive, Suite 208, San Antonio. Registration fee of $10 can be paid at the door. For more information, contact Angel Torres at 210-467-6575. 

APRIL

Bryan: The Brazos County Master Gardener's Spring Fundraiser - Plant Sale & Preview will be held Saturday, April 6, at the Demonstration Idea Garden, at the Brazos County office of Texas AgriLife Extension, 2619 Hwy 21, West, Bryan. The sale is open from: 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. A Plant Preview and Educational Booth will open prior to the sale at 8 a.m. Plants offered at the sale focus on heat and drought tolerant perennials suitable for Brazos County weather and climate; herbs and recommended vegetable varieties for this area; pass-along plants from Master Gardeners private collections; and bulbs selected for Brazos County growing conditions. The Plant Preview includes an opportunity to walk through sale area to view plant offerings, and Master Gardeners will be available during the sale to answer your plant and gardening questions. Come early, Join the fun, and bring your wagon! For additional information, visit brazosmg.com, call 979-823-0129, or email: brazosmg@brazosmg.com.

Orange: The Orange County Master Gardener Association will host their annual spring plant sale, Saturday, April 6, from 8 a.m. until noon at their greenhouse located at Jewel Cormier Park (8235 FM 1442) in Orangefield. There will be a large selection of plants, including Texas Star & Native Texas plants, along with bedding, annuals, perennials, tropicals, house plants, vines, shrubs, trees, roses, succulents, herbs and some vegetables and many more. or directions and more information, visit http://txmg.org/orange.

Austin: “Care of Ornamental Trees” will be presented Saturday, April 13, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., at Austin Community College, South Campus, room 1130, 1820 W. Stassney Lane, Austin. Oak wilt, one of the most destructive tree diseases in the United States, is killing oak trees in central Texas at epidemic proportions. Dr. David Appel, professor in the Department of Plant Pathology at Texas A&M, will teach which trees are affected by oak wilt, how to identify the disease, how it is spread, and how it can be managed. We will discuss preventative measures that can help you avoid this devastating disease. Register at https://agriliferegister.tamu.edu keyword: Trees, or by phone at 979-845-2604. Class fee is $25 (water and snacks provided). Free parking available. Sign-in at the security desk with your vehicle license number. This class is presented by the Travis County Master Gardeners, a volunteer arm of the Texas AgriLife Extension Service in Travis County.

Schulenburg: The Schulenburg Garden Club is holding its annual Flower Show celebrating 75 years of community service Tuesday, April 16, at the Schulenburg Civic Center, 1107 Hillje Ave., Schulenburg. Open to the public from noon until 4 p.m. Free Admission. Food, drink and plants for sale. For additional information, contact janetmurphy@cvctx.com.

Nacogdoches: The SFA Gardens at Stephen F. Austin State University will host its annual Garden Gala Day Spring Plant Sale from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. Saturday, April 20, at the SFA Pineywoods Native Plant Center, 2900 Raguet St. in historic Nacogdoches. A wide variety of hard-to-find, “Texas tough” plants will be available, including Texas natives, heirlooms, tropicals, perennials, shrubs, trees, and exclusive SFA and Greg Grant introductions. Most of the plants are extensively trialed in the gardens before being offered to the public and most are produced by the SFA Gardens staff and volunteers. This popular event benefits the SFA Mast Arboretum, Pineywoods Native Plant Center, Ruby M. Mize Azalea Garden, Gayla Mize Garden, and educational programs hosted at the gardens. The educational programs at SFA Gardens reach over 15,000 students ages 1 to 100 on a yearly basis. The public is encouraged to arrive early and bring a wagon. For more information, call 936-468-4404, or visit www.sfagardens.sfasu.edu and click on “garden events” for a list of available plants.

MONTHLY MEETINGS

FIRST WEEK

Houston: The Harris County Master Gardeners meet at noon the first Tuesday of each month at the Texas AgriLife Extension, 3033 Bear Creek Drive (near the intersection of Highway 6 and Patterson Road), Houston. For additional information visit http://hcmga.tamu.edu or call 281-855-5600.

Wichita Falls: The Wichita County Master Gardener Association meets at 5:30 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 600 Scott Street, Wichita Falls, on the first Tuesday of each month. For more information, visit www.txmg.org/wichita or call 940-716-8610.

Kilgore: Northeast Texas Organic Gardeners meets at 1 p.m. on the first Wednesday of each month. For more information, call Carole Ramke at 903-986-9475.

New Braunfels: The Comal Master Gardeners meet at 6 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month (except December) at the GVTC Auditorium, 36101 FM 3159, New Braunfels. An educational program preceeds the business meeting. The public is invited to attend. For additional information, call 830-620-3440 or visit http://txmg.org/comal/.

Allen: The Allen Garden Club meets at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month, February through December, at the Allen Heritage Center, 100 E. Main St., Allen. For more information, visit www.allengardenclub.org.

Brownwood: The Brown County Master Gardeners Association meets the first Thursday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 605 Fisk Ave., Brownwood. For further information, call Mary Green Engle at 325-784-8453.

Gonzalas: Gonzales Master Gardeners hold their monthly meeting at noon on the first Thursday of each month at 623 Fair Street, Gonzales. Bring a bag lunch, drinks provided. Contact AgriLife Extension Office at 830-672-8531 or visit http://gonzalesmastergardeners.org for more information.

SECOND WEEK

Austin: Austin Organic Gardeners Club meets at 6:30 p.m. on the second Monday of each month (except December) at the Austin Area Garden Center, 2220 Barton Springs Road, Zilker Botanical Gardens in Austin. For more information, visit www.austinorganicgardeners.org.

Evant: The Evant Garden Club meets on the second Tuesday of each month at 10 a.m., usually at the bank in downtown Evant. To confirm the date, time and place of each month's meeting, call 254-471-5585.

Marion: The Guadalupe County (Schertz/Seguin) Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets on the second Tuesday of each month except July and August at The Library, 500 Bulldog, Marion. There is a plant exchange and meet-and-greet begins at 6:30 p.m. followed by the program at 7 p.m. Visitors are welcome. For more information or an application to join NPSOT visit www.npsot.org/GuadalupeCounty/ or contact guadalupecounty@npsot.org.

Quitman: The Quitman Garden Club meets at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month at the Quitman Library on E Goode Street, Quitman. It is a diverse group that welcomes all visitors.For more information, e-mail quitmangardenclub@gmail.com.

Humble: The Mercer Arboretum & Botanic Garden, 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble, hosts a Lunch Bunch the second Wednesday of each month from noon until 2 p.m. Take a sack lunch or order a box lunch from Starbucks when you call 281-443-8731 to reserve your spot. Master Gardeners and Masters Naturalists may earn CEU credits by attending.

Jacksboro: The Jacksboro Garden Club meets at 9:30 a.m. the second Wednesday of each month (except June, July and August) at the Concerned Citizens Center, 400 East Pine Street, Jacksboro. For more information, call Melinda at 940-567-6218.

Longview: The Gregg County Master Gardeners Association meets the second Wednesday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 405 E. Marshall Ave., Longview. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program preceding the business meeting. For further information call Cindy Gill at 903-236-8429 or visit www.gregg-tx.tamu.edu.

Rockport: The Rockport Herb & Rose Study Group, founded in March 2003, meets the second Wednesday of each month at 10 a.m. at 619 N. Live Oak Street, Room 14, Rockport, to discuss all aspects of using and growing herbs, including historical uses and tips for successful propagation and cultivation. Sometimes they take field trips and have cooking demonstrations in different locations. For more information, contact Linda 361-729-6037, Ruth 361-729-8923 or Cindy 979-562-2153 or visit www.rockportherbs.org and http://rockportherbies.blogspot.com.

Woodway: The McLennan County Master Gardeners meet on the second Wednesday each month at noon at the Carleen Bright Arboretum, 9001 Bosque Blvd., Woodway.; Educational programs follow the business session. For more information, call 254-757-5180.

Beaumont: The Jefferson County Master Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the AgriLife Extension Office, 1225 Pearl Street, Suite 200, Beaumont. For more information, call 409-835-8461.

Georgetown: The Williamson County Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the Georgetown Public Library, 402 W. 8th Street. Georgetown. For additional information, contract Billye Adams at 512-863-9636 or visit http://www.npsot.org/WilliamsonCounty/default.htm.

Orange: The Orange County Master Gardeners Association holds their monthly meeting on the second Thursday of each month. A short program is presented. The meeting starts at 6:30 p.m. at the Salvation Army Bldg. cor. MLK & Strickland in Orange. Pot luck supper at 6 p.m. Visit http://txmg.org/orange for more information.

San Antonio: The San Antonio Herb Society meets at 7 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month at the San Antonio Garden Center, 3310 N. New Braunfels (corner of Funston & N. New Braunfels). For more information on programs, visit www.sanantonioherbs.org.

Angleton: The Brazoria County Master Gardeners meet at 11 a.m. on the second Friday of each month at the Brazoria County Extension Office, 21017 County Road 171, Angleton. There is a general business meeting followed by a brief educational program each month. For further information call 979-864-1558, ext.110.

College Station: The A&M Garden Club meets on the second Friday of each month during the school year at 9:30 a.m. in the training room of the College Station Waste Water Facility building at the end of North Forest Parkway, College Station. Expert speakers, plant sharing, and federated club projects help members learn about gardening in the Brazos Valley, floral design, conservation, and more. For more information, visit http://www.amgardenclub.com/.

Houston: The Spring Branch African Violet Club meets the second Saturday of each month, January through November, at 10:30am at the Copperfield Baptist Church, 8350 Highway 6 North, Houston. Call Karla at 281-748-8417 prior to attending to confirm meeting date and time.

Dallas: The Rainbow Garden Club of North Texas meets the second Sunday of each month at 2 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Meetings are held at member’s homes and garden centers around the area. For more information, visit www.RainbowGardenClub.com.

THIRD WEEK

Arlington: The Arlington Men's Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the third Monday of each month (except December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact Lance Jepson at LJepson@aol.com.

Cleburne: The Johnson County Master Gardeners meet at 2 p.m. on the third Monday of each month at McGregor House, 1628 W. Henderson, Cleburne, which includes a program and a meet & greet. For more information, call Sharon Smith at 817-894-7700.

Rockport: Monthly meetings of the Aransas/San Patricio Master Gardeners are held at 10 a.m. on the third Tuesday of each month at Texas AgriLife Extension Service - Aransas County Office, 892 Airport Rd., Rockport. For additional information, e-mail aransas-tx@tamu.edu or call 361-790-0103.

Sugar Land: The Sugar Land Garden Club meets on the third Tuesday of each month, September through November and January through April at 10 a.m. at the Sugar Land Community Center, 226 Matlage Way, Sugar Land. The club hosts a different speaker each month. For more information, visit www.sugarlandgardenclub.org.

Denton: The Denton Organic Society, a group devoted to sharing information and educating the public regarding organic principles, meets the third Wednesday of each month (except July, August and December) at the Denton Senior Center, 509 N. Bell Avenue. Meetings are free and open to the public. Meetings begin at 7 p.m. and are preceded by a social at 6:30. For more information, call 940-382-8551.

Glen Rose: The Somervell County Master Gardeners meet at 10 a.m., the third Wednesday of each month at the Somervell County AgriLife Extension office, 1405 Texas Drive, Glen Rose. Visitors are welcome. For more information, call 254-897-2809 or visit www.somervellmastergardeners.org.

Granbury: The Lake Granbury Master Gardeners meet at 1 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at the Hood County Annex 1, 1410 West Pearl Street, Granbury. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program each month preceding the business meeting. For information on topics call 817-579-3280 or visit http://www.hoodcountymastergardeners.org/.

Seabrook: The Harris County Precinct 2 Master Gardeners hold an educational program at 10 a.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at The Meeting Room at Clear Lake Park (on the Lakeside), 5001 NASA Road 1, Seabrook. The programs are free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu.

Brownwood: Brownwood Garden Club meets the third Thursday of each month, 11:30 a.m.– 1 p.m.  The club meetings are at Southside Baptist Church, 1219 Indian Creek Road, with refreshments and a speaker presentation. Visitors are welcome. For more information, email boeblingen@centex.net or call 817-454-8175).

Houston: The Native Plant Society of Texas — Houston (NPSOT-H) meets at 7:30 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except for October (4th Thursday) and December (2nd Thursday). Location varies. For locations, for more information on programs, and for information about native plants for Houston, visit http://www.npsot.org/Houston.

Rosenberg: The Fort Bend Master Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except December at the Bud O’Shieles Community Center located at 1330 Band Road, Rosenberg. For more information, call 281-341-7068 or visit www.fbmg.com.

Seguin: The Guadalupe County Master Gardeners meets at 7 p.m. the third Thursday of each month, except June and December, at the Texas AgriLife Extension Bldg. at 210 E. Live Oak, Seguin. An educational program precedes the business meeting. The public is invited to attend. For topic or other information, call 830-379-1972 or visit www.guadalupecountymastergardeners.org.

FOURTH WEEK

Brackenridge Park: The Native Plant Society San Antonio Chapter meets every fourth Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. in the Lions Field Adult and Senior Center, 2809 Broadway at E. Mulberry, Brackenridge Park, except August and December. Social and seed/plant exchange at 6:30 p.m. Free and open to the public. For more information, contact Bea at 210-999-7292 or visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio.

Bryan: The Brazos County Master Gardeners, a program of Texas AgriLife Extension, meet the fourth Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. at the Brazos Center, 3232 Briarcrest Drive, Bryan. There is a public gardening program at each meeting and pertinent information may be found at brazosmg.com or 979-823-0129.

Edna: The Jackson County Master Gardeners present their "Come Grown With Us" seminars on the fourth Tuesday of each month, January through October, beginning at 7 p.m. at 411 N. Wells, Edna. The seminars are free, open to the public and offer 2 CEU hours to Master Gardeners or others requiring them. For additional information, contact the Jackson County Extension Office at 361-782-3312.

Linden: The Caddo Wildflower Chapter of Native Plants Society meets the fourth Tuesday of each month at the senior citizens building at 507 S Kaufman St. in Linden at 6:30. Visitors are welcome. For additional information, contact Karen Tromza at khtromza@yahoo.com.

Fort Worth: The Organic Garden Club of Forth Worth meets at 7 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday of each month except July and December at the Deborah Beggs Moncrief Garden Center, 3220 Botanic Blvd., Ft. Worth. Refreshments are served. For more information, call 817-263-9322 or visit www.ogcfw.webs.com.

San Antonio: The Native Plant Society of Texas San Antonio Chapter meets the fourth Tuesday of each month, except August and December, at the Lions Field Adult & Senior Center, 2809 Broadway, San Antonio. Social and plant/seed exchange at 6:30 p.m., program at 7:00 p.m. For more information, visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio or call Bea at 210-999-7292.

Houston: The Houston Chapter of the Native Prairie Association of Texas (HNPAT) meets from 7 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. the fourth Wednesday of each month at Bayland Park Community Center, 6400 Bissonnet, Houston. For more information, contact hnpat@prairies.org.

Leander: The Leander Garden Club meets on the fourth Thursday of each month (except July and August) at 10:30 a.m. at the community room behind the Greater Texas Federal Credit Union,1300 N. Bell, Cedar Park, unless there is special event planned. Following a program and short business meeting, we share a pot-luck luncheon. To confirm the meeting place and time, please call president Cathy Clark-Ramsey at 512-963-4698 or email info@leandergc.org.

Dallas: The Greater Dallas Organic Garden Club meets at 7:00 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of each month at the REI, 4515 LBJ Freeway, Dallas. For more information, call 214-824-2448 or visit www.gdogc.org.

Arlington: The Arlington Organic Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the last Thursday of each month (except November and December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact David at 817-483-7746.


Texas Fruit and Vegetable Gardening

By Greg Grant

This new book incorporates Greg’s horticultural expertise along with his homespun writing style and, unlike other books on vegetable gardening, this one includes chapters on fruit, nuts and herbs along with a nice selection of family recipes.

This easy-to-follow, color-packed guide features:

  • Planting, care and harvesting information for more than 60 edibles
  • Popular vegetable selections from arugula to tomatoes
  • A variety of common and unusual fruits and herbs
  • Advice on garden planning, creating the perfect soil, watering and more!
  • It is a must have for every serious gardener in Texas and neighboring states.

$29.79 (includes tax and shipping)

Call 1-800-727-9020 or visit us online at www.texasgardener.com to order your copy today!

American Express, Discover, MasterCard and Visa accepted.


The Texas Tomato Lover's Handbook

The best thing for tomato enthusiasts since the tomato itself! William D. Adams draws on more than thirty years' experience to provide a complete, step-by-step guide to success in the tomato patch. Learn everything from soil preparation, planting, feeding, caging and watering. Liberally sprinkled with the author's easy humor and illustrated with his own excellent photographs, the must have book has everything you'll need to assure a bumper crop! 189 pages. Lots of color photographs!

Only $26.69 for Seeds readers! Free shipping!

To take advantage of this special offer, call toll-free 1-800-727-9020.

American Express, Discover, MasterCard and Visa accepted.



Paperback edition.


Kindle edition.

NOW AVAILABLE IN PAPERBACK!
In Greg's Garden: A Pineywoods Perspective on Gardening, Nature and Family
By Greg Grant
Foreword by Chris S. Corby

An intimate and personal exploration of the life of one of Texas’ most beloved gardeners, In Greg’s Garden: A Pineywoods Perspective on Gardening, Nature and Family gathers in a single volume the first 10 years of Greg Grant’s columns from Texas Gardener magazine, and is amply illustrated with Grant’s own full-color photography.

Revised and updated from their original publication, these 60 essays reveal the heart and soul of a seventh-generation native Texan who has devoted his entire life to gardening, nature and family. With degrees in floriculture and horticulture from Texas A&M University and extensive hands-on experience as a horticulturist with the Texas Agricultural Extension Service, Stephen F. Austin State University, Mercer Arboretum and San Antonio Botanical Gardens, Grant has successfully introduced dozens of plants to the Texas nursery industry, all while maintaining long-held family property and renovating the homes of his ancestors in Arcadia, Texas.

In Greg’s Garden: A Pineywoods Perspective on Gardening, Nature and Family is a must-read for every Texas gardener.

$36.74 (includes shipping and sales tax)

Remit payment to: TG Books • PO Box 9005 • Waco, TX 76714
www.TexasGardener.com
or call Toll-Free 1-800-727-9020

American Express, Visa, MasterCard and Discover accepted

The previous text-only edition of In Greg’s Garden: A Pineywoods Perspective on Gardening, Nature and Family, containing the first nine years of Greg Grant’s column, is still available for Kindle from Amazon.com.


Wish you'd saved them?

Are you missing an important issue of Texas Gardener? Or, perhaps, just tired of thumbing through stacks of back issues looking for the tips and techniques you need to make your garden grow? These new CDs provide easy access to all six issues of

volume 20 (November/December 2000 through September/October 2001),
volume 21
(November/December 2001 through September/October 2002),
volume 22
(November/December 2002 through September/October 2003),
volume 23
(November/December 2003 through September/October 2004),
volume 24 (November/December 2004 through September/October 2005),
volume 25 (November/December 2005 through September/October 2006),
volume 26 (November/December 2006 through September/October 2007),
volume 27 (November/December 2007 through September/October 2008),
volume 28 (November/December 2008 through September/October 2009),
volume 29 (November/December 2009 through September/October 2010),
volume 30 (November/December 2010 through September/October 2011) and
volume 31 (November/December 2011 through September/October 2012)*.

$16.99 per CD includes tax and shipping

Order by calling 1-800-727-9020.

(American Express, Discover, MasterCard and Visa accepted.)

*Other volumes will be available soon.


Fiber row cover valuable year-round

Grow-Web encourages plant growth and development, and also provides protection from insects, birds, diseases and frosts. It is also air and water permeable and allows for ventilation. Grow-Web provides excellent protection to seedlings when applied directly to the seedbed.

$31.88 per 12.3’ x 32.8’ roll (includes shipping!)

Order by calling 1-800-727-9020 or order on-line.

(American Express, Discover, MasterCard and Visa accepted.)


Become a Texas Gardener fan on Facebook

Become a fan of Texas Gardener magazine on Facebook. See what we're up to at http://www.facebook.com/pages/Texas-Gardener-Magazine/301356291835?ref=nf.


Texas Gardener’s Seeds is published weekly. © Suntex Communications, Inc. 2013. All rights reserved. You may forward this publication to your friends and colleagues if it is sent in its entirety. No individual part of this newsletter may be reproduced in any manner without prior written permission from the publisher.

Missed an issue? Back issues of Texas Gardener’s Seeds are available at www.texasgardener.com/newsletters.

Publisher: Chris S. Corby ● Editor: Michael Bracken

Texas Gardener’s Seeds, P.O. Box 9005, Waco, Texas 76714 ● www.TexasGardener.com