May 1, 2013

Welcome to Texas Gardener’s Seeds, the weekly newsletter for Texas gardeners. Please do not reply to this e-mail because the sending address is not monitored. See the bottom of this newsletter for information on how to subscribe, unsubscribe, or contact the editor.


The garden reader:
A big book for Houston gardeners

By William Scheick
Book Reviewer

Lynn M. Herbert. A Garden Book for Houston and the Texas Gulf Coast. River Oaks Garden Club, 2013. 672 pp. $40.00.

When I think of the Houston area, I envy its ample rain. Trying to garden in Central Texas, which seems to be drought-morphing into West Texas, how could I not imagine the splendor of so much rain.

I know, however, that Houston rainfall tends to come too copiously, often in short bursts, resulting in useless runoff. And I know that this is hardly the only challenge for gardeners in southeastern and coastal Texas.

According to the contributors to A Garden Book for Houston, much of that area “has too much clay in its soil and suffers from the resulting drainage problems. Salt is another problem … with a number of underground salt domes pushing ever upward, as well as tropical storms that deposit salt water on our soils.”

In other ways, too, this area resists one-answer cultivation: There are “ten distinct ecological systems within sixty miles of [Houston’s] downtown center. They include parts or all of the Big Thicket, Piney Woods, Trinity Bottomlands, Columbia Bottomlands, Prairie Systems, Post Oak Savannah, Estuaries and Bays, Coastal Marshes, Beach Dunes on the Gulf of Mexico and Bayou Wilderness.”

Clearly, Houston-area gardeners have a lot to consider. So it is easy to understand why the River Oaks Garden Club, with a grant from the Brown Foundation, has backed a thoroughly undated fifth edition of its gardening guide for southeastern Texas.

This book covers everything a gardener there would benefit from knowing, including discussions of sustainable plants, attractive designs and manageable maintenance. The new edition particularly highlights an environmental awareness that encourages native-plant cultivation, water conservation and (most notably) organic methods.

“Switching to organic gardening involves adopting a different mindset ... and making that change today is much easier than it was even five years ago” because “Houston is fortunate to have many trailblazing institutions and companies who have shown us the way.”

Rich in accessible practical advice for gardeners at all levels of experience and also attractively designed and illustrated, A Garden Book for Houston is easily worth its price.

And Lynn Herbert, this book’s author and editor, deserves a sustained round of applause. But I’ll bet she would settle for those notes of thanks she is surely going to receive over the years from readers who benefit from her prodigious effort in A Garden Book for Houston.


  Getting your garden ready for the coming hot and dry summer

By Tom Harris, Ph.D.
The Hill Country Gardener

Many people ask, “What’s a gardener supposed to do during the summer here? It’s too hot to grow anything and flowers are just out of the question.”

Fear not, oh impatient gardener. There are lots of things to be done for the garden during the hot summer.

To start with, you could add compost and/or mulch to all your beds; 2-3” compost in the vegetable beds and 1-2” compost in the other beds. Work the compost into the soil if you can, but it’s no big deal if you can’t. It will still do its magic just lying on top.

Mulch, on the other hand, should only be put on 2-3” deep so that it doesn’t absorb too much moisture and keep it away from plant roots. Woody mulch will become compost in less than a year around here so it will have to be replaced as much as twice per year.

Sometimes in the “summer” here, it’s still a little cool in the morning. But you know it’s going to get warm before the day is over, so dress in layers that you can peel off as the day goes on. Oh, and be sure to drink plenty of water when it does warm up. Dehydration can be deadly.

Consider replacing or adding drip irrigation to some or all of your beds. It will be one of the most rewarding experiences you can have…especially if you have raised beds. Your plants will love you for it, plus you’ll save lots of money on your water bill.

If you’ve been putting off working in your gardens because the ground is just too hard to deal with, try building some raised beds. They only have to be 6” deep in order to grow anything you want to grow — apples to zucchini. Use light garden mix or 3- or 4-way mix for the soil…it has lots of compost in it.

Be sure to keep the soil in your beds moist for the plant roots. The easiest way to gauge the moisture is to stick your God-given moisture meter (a.k.a. finger) into the soil down to the second joint. If it’s moist, you’ll feel it; if it’s dry you’ll feel it. If it’s moist don’t water; if it’s dry, water. Very simple.

Please consider replacing your water-guzzling grass with some native or adapted-to-Texas plants. The Master Gardeners in Austin have an excellent publication full of excellent information and pictures to help you do it. Give them a call at 512-854-9600 and ask for the Master Gardener desk, please. You won’t regret it.


The compost heap
Gray water

"In the discussion about gray water use by Texas A&M ('Research on gray water use for home irrigation getting positive initial results," Seeds, April 24, 2013), nowhere is it stated that one shouldn’t use gray water on the garden areas," writes Paula T. Phillips. "I know this is pretty much common sense, but there might be some folks who think it’s OK to use this kind of water to water their garden."

Paula, your concern about using gray water in the garden is understandable. However, gray water can be used in the garden if you follow a few simple rules and use common sense. Obviously, toilet water should not be diverted to the garden. Even washing machine water that has been used to wash baby diapers should not be used since it likely would contain fecal matter. Water from showers and baths could be used in the garden in limited amounts. In a drought like we have been in for the past 2 years, it may be the only water available for use in the garden in some parts of the state. For more on how to use gray water in the garden, click on the following link to an excellent article by the University of Mass at Amherst: http://extension.umass.edu/landscape/fact-sheets/recycling-gray-water-home-gardens. — Chris S. Corby, publisher


Gardening tips

"I grow lots of the native bunch grass Gulf Muhly in my beds for the birds and butterflies," writes Selena Schindler. "Every spring I cut them back to remove the dead growth, and I have come up with a way that's easier to do. First thing is to sharpen your hand shears — the old fashioned hand operated shrub shears — and get a bungee about 6-8 inches long. Wrap your bungee around the base of your bunch grass, sometimes depending on the size of your grass it may be a wrap or two, then slide it up about 4 inches. This gives you a nice height to trim your grass and then work your way through the clump with your sheers just below the bungee. As you cut, lean the bunch to one side for easier cutting. When you're done the grass is in one nice clump to dump on the compost pile."

Have a favorite gardening tip you’d like to share? Texas Gardener’s Seeds is seeking brief gardening tips from Texas gardeners to use in future issues. If we publish your tip in Seeds, we will send you a free Texas Gardener 2013 Planning Guide & Calendar. Please send your tips of 50 words or less to the editor at: Gardening Tips.


Did you know...

Malaria is the Italian word for “bad air.” Centuries ago, it was thought that malaria was present in the air and that is how folks got the disease. As we now know, malaria is spread by mosquitoes. They also transmit yellow fever, Rift Valley Fever and around one hundred other human diseases. Roughly one in five of all insect-transmitted diseases come from mosquitoes, making them the world’s most deadly insect. Source: Wicked Bugs by Amy Stewart.


Upcoming garden events

If you would like your organization’s events included in "Upcoming Garden Events" or would like to make a change to a listed event, please contact us at Garden Events. To ensure inclusion in this column, please provide complete details at least three weeks prior to the event.

MAY

Austin: The Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service in Travis County will present a Water Wi$e Workshop from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. May 4 at Ragsdale Center, St. Edward’s University, 3001 S. Congress Ave. in Austin. The building is located near the center of the St. Edward’s campus, adjacent to the bookstore. Parking is free and will be clearly marked. The workshop is for anyone who would benefit from information and guidance related to plant selection to conserve water, rainwater harvesting, efficient home irrigation systems, converting landscapes from lawn to ornamental plants and water quality. Because water conservation is the central topic of the program, many workshop topics will address how attendees can get a “bigger bang for their buck” from their water bill. Cost is $25 for adults and $15 for youth ages 8-12, including lunch, which provides a vegetarian option. There also will be water conservation-related giveaways. The program also will offer many fun and educational activities and games for youth related to water conservation. At the event, kids can learn about area aquifers, rainwater simulation and water conservation at home and school during the program. It’s a great opportunity for the whole family to learn more about being ‘water wise’ while having fun together. Attendees may register online at https://agriliferegister.tamu.edu. Enter “water” into the keyword field.

Fort Worth: Enjoy a Backyard Chickens lecture and show-and-tell sponsored by the Tarrant County Master Gardener Association, Friday, May 3, 10 a.m. – noon at the TCMGA Community Demonstration Garden pavilion, 1800 Circle Drive, at the Fort Worth Resource Connection. The Resource Connection is located off Campus Dr, north from I-20. Look for the Resource Connection signs on Campus Drive. Cost is $5 and class limit is 20. Pre-registration is required. To register and for more information/directions, contact Billie Hammack at blhammack@ag.tamu.edu or call 817-884-1296.

Dallas: A WaterWise Irrigation Workshop, "Get to Know Your Sprinkler System," will be presented at 9 a.m., Saturday, May 4, at Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center, 17360 Coit Road, Dallas. Like most things, your sprinkler system needs maintenance and with summer just around the corner, now is a great time to ensure that your sprinkler system is operating at peak efficiency. Outdoor watering accounts for up to 60 percent of water use in the spring and summer and this free workshop will help you make sure your system won't waste a single drop. The WaterWise Irrigation Workshop is designed for residents to gain a better understanding for how your automatic irrigation (sprinkler) system operates. This outdoor event (rain or shine) will have operating above ground irrigation systems with professional irrigators to guide you through specific conservation items such as high pressure symptoms; simple repairs; programming controllers, and more. Registration is limited so sign up today!" The event begins at 9 a.m. and ends at noon and takes about an hour to visit all stations. Some stations have specific times for demonstrations. For additional information, visit http://dallas.tamu.edu.

Fort Worth: Learn about Earth-Kind Gardening from Tarrant County Master Gardeners on Saturday, May 4, 2–4 p.m. at the Fort Worth Resource Connection, Building 2300, Magnolia Room, 2300 Circle Drive, Fort Worth. The Resource Connection is located off Campus Dr, north from I-20. Look for the Resource Connection signs on Campus Drive. Class fee is $5 and the class is limited to 40. Pre-registration is required. To register and for more information/directions, contact Billie Hammack at blhammack@ag.tamu.edu or call 817-884-1296.

Fort Worth: Tarrant County Master Gardener Association Propagation Specialists will teach “Propagation-Seeds” at Master Gardener classes for families at the Fort Worth Botanic Garden children’s vegetable garden greenhouse, Saturday, May 4, 10 a.m. Cost: $10 per adult; $5 per child. Class limit: 20. Pre-registration is required. To register and for more information/directions, contact Billie Hammack at blhammack@ag.tamu.edu or call 817-884-1296.

La Marque: “Herbs for the Gulf Coast” will be presented from 9 a.m. until 11:30 a.m., Saturday, May 4, at Galveston County AgriLife Extension Office in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (FM 519), La Marque. This program is presented by Galveston County Master Gardener Cindy Croft. Cindy’s program on herbs discusses herbs that work well for the Gulf Coast Garden including growing tips, lore, propagation and uses. The audience is encouraged to share their experiences and participate in the discussion. For course reservations, call 281-534-3413, ext. 12 or email GALV3@wt.net.

McKinney: The Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service and Collin County Master Gardeners Association will conduct a guided walking tour of beautiful Myers Park and Event Center in McKinney on Saturday, May 4. The 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. tour will feature the Earth-Kind Perennial Research and Demonstration Gardens, Crape Myrtle, Kordes Rose, and Vegetable trial gardens. One of the largest rain gardens in Collin County, and the state of the art rainwater harvesting systems will also be on display. The purpose of the research and demonstration gardens is to put Earth-Kind principles to the test. Texas A&M AgriLife Extension and Collin County Master Gardeners are evaluating these plants without the use of fertilizer or pesticides, and with limited supplemental irrigation. They are collecting data on plant performance to identify low maintenance, superior plants for North Texas landscapes. This exciting tour will provide gardeners a first-hand opportunity to see which plants grow well in our area and knowledge they need to have successful gardening experiences at their own homes. Tour guides will be available at all the demonstration and research gardens to provide visitors with information and to answer questions. Myers Park is beautiful! Pack a snack, and after the tour take some time to enjoy a picnic, or stroll among the gardens, enjoying butterflies in the beautiful outdoor space. Myers Park is located at 7117 County Road 166, McKinney. The tour is free and children are welcome. Call 972-548-4232 or visit ccmgatx.org for more information.

Fort Worth: Learn about herbs from the Tarrant County Master Gardener Association Herb Team, Tuesday, May 7, 10 a.m.-noon, at the TCMGA Community Demonstration Garden pavilion and herb garden, 1800 Circle Drive, at the Fort Worth Resource Connection. The Resource Connection islocated off Campus Dr, north from I-20. Look for the Resource Connection signs on Campus Drive. Cost is $5 and class limit is 20. Pre-registration is required. To register and for more information/directions, contact Billie Hammack at blhammack@ag.tamu.edu or call 817-884-1296.

Dallas: "Gardening for Small Spaces" will be presented from 9 a.m. until noon, May 11 at The Texas Discovery Gardens at Fair Park, 3601 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Dallas. See how easy it is to grow a vegetable garden or add some seasonal color to your balcony or patio, Learn sustainable gardening in a small space, including how to make a compost bin with worms. Take home a finished container and vermicompost bin. $60; $48 for TDG members. Register in advance at http://texasdiscoverygardens.org or 214-428-7476, ext 341.

Denton County: “Living Green with Style” is the theme of the Denton County Master Gardener Association’s 2013 Spring Garden Tour, which will be from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. on Saturday, May 11. Seven gardens, both public and private, are on this year’s fund-raising tour, including two in Southlake, two in Flower Mound and one each in Highland Village, Lewisville and Carrollton. Garden Tour tickets are $10 in advance and may be purchased online at www.dcmga.com. On the day of the tour, tickets are $12 for admission to all gardens or $5 for a single garden. Children under 14 do not require a ticket. Local nurseries will provide door prizes for the event. The Spring Garden Tour will be held rain or shine. Cameras are welcome. Proceeds from the tour fund public educational projects and programs throughout Denton County.

Fort Worth: It’s a bug lecture and show and tell from Tarrant County Master Gardeners, Saturday, May 11, 10 a.m - noon, at the Fort Worth Resource Connection, Building 2300, Mesquite Room, 2300 Circle Drive, Fort Worth. The Resource Connection is located off Campus Dr, north from I-20. Look for the Resource Connection signs on Campus Drive. Class fee is $5 and the class is limited to 30. Pre-registration is required. To register and for more information/directions, contact Billie Hammack at blhammack@ag.tamu.edu or call 817-884-1296.

La Marque: The Galveston County Home Fruit Grower’s Tour will be held from 9 a.m. until noon, Saturday, May 11. Three Galveston County fruit orchards are on this year’s tour. Vegetable gardens at each site will also be open. Tour sites contain a wide variety of fruit trees ranging from a large peach orchard in Dickerson, the Galveston County Master Gardeners Demonstration Orchard in La Marque and a sizeable Master Gardeners home orchard in Santa Fe. No pre-registration needed. Visit sites in any desired order. There is no rescheduling of this event due to inclement weather. Wear appropriate shoes and necessary attire. Tour sites: Wilson and Renee Hillman’s Fruits ’N Such orchard, 6309 Ave U, Dickinson (located off Bowerman Road and FM 517). 832-443-6733; Galveston County Master Gardener Demonstration Orchard and Garden, 4102 B Main Street, Carbide Park, La Marque; and Galveston County Master Gardener Bill Verm’s home and backyard, 5202 Highland Road, Santa Fe. Additional information and maps will be posted on the following web sites: http://galveston.agrilife.org/ and http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/index.htm.

New Braunfels: The Comal Master Gardeners and New Braunfels Conservation Society will host "Celebrating with Herbs," an herb festival with free admission, displays of herbal decorations, gift ideas, food samples, and many vendors, from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m., May 11, at Conservation Plaza, 1300 Church Hill Dr., New Braunfels. For additional information, call 830-832-9699 or visit newbraunfelsconservation.org.

Houston: Bob Randall, Ph.D., will discuss “What to Plant & Do” at the May 13 meeting of HUG (Houston Urban Gardeners), beginning at 6:30 p.m. at the Houston Garden Center (713-284-1989), 1500 Hermann Park Dr., Houston. To access parking go to the lot across from Miller Outdoor Theater. Randall has been teaching Southeast Texas organic fruit and vegetable gardening since 1986 and has taught Permaculture since 1992. He is the author of the best-selling “Year-Round Vegetables, Fruits and Flowers for Metro-Houston, 12th edition,” and, as the founding Executive Director of Urban Harvest for 14 years, was influential in the development of Houston area community gardens, school gardens, farmers markets, and organic landscaping. Gather, socialize, and munch on snacks from 6:30 to 6:45, when the program begins.

Dallas: “Drip Irrigation DIY” will be presented May 14, 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. at 17360 Coit Road, Dallas. This program teaches how to install a drip irrigation system from your faucet or how to convert an existing system to drip. Drip irrigation is the most efficient irrigation method and essential to sustainable landscapes. Drip irrigation for foundation watering will also be covered. For more information and to register, visit http://dallas.tamu.edu or email urbanwater@tamu.edu.

Dallas: “Container Gardening” will be presented May 16, 10 a.m. until noon. & 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. at 17360 Coit Road, Dallas. This program teaches how to prepare and install a container garden. You will learn how to prepare the container, prepare the soil, and install a well-planned mix of annuals, perennials, and other colorful foliage plants. For more information and to register, visit http://dallas.tamu.edu or email urbanwater@tamu.edu.

San Antonio: Bexar County Master Gardeners will meet on Thursday, May 16, at 3355 Cherry Ridge Drive, Suite 208, San Antonio. The social begins at 6 p.m., followed at 6:30 p.m. with the presentation "The Truth About Lavender Growing" from Melanie Van Aken. Come learn about the many uses for lavender. This program is open to the public and is free. For more information, contact Lisa Nixon at 210-364-7844 or email lisa.nixon@bexarcountymastergardeners.org.

Seguin: The Guadlupe County Master Gardeners will meet Thursday, May 16, at 7 p.m. in the AgriLife Extension Building, 210 E. Live Oak, Seguin. Dr. Gus Gross will speak about "Treating Poisonous Snake Bites." Meetings are free and open to the public. For more information, visit www.guadalupecountymastergardeners.org or call 830-303-3889.

Fort Worth: Learn about plants that “Survive and Thrive” from the Tarrant County Master Gardener Association, Saturday, May 18, 10 a.m. – noon at the Fort Worth Resource Connection, Building 2300, Mesquite Room, 2300 Circle Drive, Fort Worth. The Resource Connection is located off Campus Dr, north from I-20. Look for the Resource Connection signs on Campus Drive. Class fee is $5 and the class is limited to 40. Pre-registration is required. To register and for more information/directions, contact Billie Hammack at blhammack@ag.tamu.edu or call 817-884-1296.

Fort Worth: Learn about “Backyard Chickens” at the Tarrant County Master Gardener classes for families at the Fort Worth Botanic Garden children’s vegetable garden pavilion, Saturday, May 18, 10 a.m. Cost: $10 per adult; $5 per child. Class limit: 20. Pre-registration is required. To register and for more information/directions, contact Billie Hammack at blhammack@ag.tamu.edu or call 817-884-1296.

Rockwall County: The 10th Annual Tour of Gardens, the premier educational event of the Rockwall County Master Gardener Association, is scheduled for May 18 from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. In celebration of the 10th Anniversary, this year’s Tour of Gardens will include visits to favorite gardens from past tours. Tickets went on sale April 1. Cost is $8 in advance and $10 on the day of the tour. Details and ticket locations will be posted on rockmga.org as they become available, or call 972-204-7660 for more information!

Dallas: "Edible Wild Plants" will be presented from 10 a.m. until 1 p.m., May 18 at The Texas Discovery Gardens at Fair Park, 3601 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Dallas. Many of our local plants, especially common weeds, are extremely nutritious! Director of Horticulture Roger Sanderson explains which are tasty and which are not. Sample some of the native fare at the end of the workshop. $20; $15 for TDG members. Register in advance at http://texasdiscoverygardens.org or 214-428-7476, ext 341.

San Antonio: "How to Build a Raised Bed Garden" and "Saving Water/Money Through Drip Irrigation" will be presented from 6:30 p.m. until 8:30 p.m., Tuesday, May 21, at 3355 Cherry Ridge Drive, Suite 208, San Antonio. Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service Horticulturist David Rodriguez will be joined by Master Gardeners Ron Csehil and Dr. Tom Harris to show you all the advantages of raised beds, such as improved soil and drainage, increased yield, better pest control, less weeding, and easier access to your beds. This presentation is open to the public. Registration fee of $10 may be paid at the door. For more information and to RSVP, contact Angel Torres at 210-467-6575.

Fort Worth: Make and take cement leaves taught by Tarrant County Master Gardeners, Saturday, May 25, 10 a.m. – noon at the TCMGA Community Demonstration Garden pavilion, 1800 Circle Drive, at the Fort Worth Resource Connection. The Resource Connection is located off Campus Dr, north from I-20. Look for the Resource Connection signs on Campus Drive. Cost is $25 and class limit is 20. Pre-registration is required. To register and for more information/directions, contact Billie Hammack at blhammack@ag.tamu.edu or call 817-884-1296.

Bryan: Wade Roitsch, Manager of Yucca Do Nursery, will present "Agaves and Woody Lilies with Landscape Power," showcasing the species of Agaves, Yuccas and other succulents that are suitable additions for the landscapes of the humid regions of Texas, at 7 p.m., Tuesday, May 28, at Brazos Center, 3232 Briarcrest Dr., Bryan. Wade Roitsch was raised on a ranch near Manor, just east of Austin. A Texas A&M graduate, he began working in the horticulture industry in 1990 and joined the Yucca Do Nursery, Inc., as a plant propagator in 1997. Roitsch presently is the manager of Yucca Do at their new location in Giddings. The nursery is noted as the source for heat and drought-tolerant plants. They offer curious plants cultivars from the southwest, Mexico, South America, Africa, Asia and beyond. The public is invited at no charge to this program. For additional information, visit brazosmg.com, call 979-823-0129, or email brazosmg@brazosmg.com.

Dallas: “Composting” will be presented May 28, 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. & October 10, 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. at 17360 Coit Road, Dallas. This program teaches the composting process, the different types and methods of composting, as well as how to compost and its importance. Adding compost to your garden, landscape, and/or container garden improves your soils nutrition, moisture retention, and aeration. For more information and to register, visit http://dallas.tamu.edu or email urbanwater@tamu.edu.

SEPTEMBER

Dallas: “Vegetable Garden-Fall” will be presented September 4, 10 a.m. until noon, at 17360 Coit Road, Dallas. This program teaches homeowners the proper time to germinate fall vegetable seeds and/or when to transplant fall vegetables into their vegetable garden. It also teaches proper soil preparation, insect and disease and weed control. For more information and to register, visit http://dallas.tamu.edu or email urbanwater@tamu.edu.

OCTOBER

Dallas: “Trees for North Texas” will be presented October 8, 6 p.m. until 7 p.m. at 17360 Coit Road, Dallas. This program teaches proper tree selection and planting for North Texas. Selecting the right tree and planting it properly helps improve the sustainability of your home or business landscape. Tree list provided. For more information and to register, visit http://dallas.tamu.edu or email urbanwater@tamu.edu.

Houston/Ft. Worth: A total of 10 Texas gardeners will share their private gardens with the public in 2013 through the Garden Conservancy’s Open Days program, America’s only national private garden-visiting program. Open Days in Texas take place on the following dates. Sunday, October 13: Visit four private gardens open in Fort Worth, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Features include a country estate with formal spaces and an organic orchard, an urban garden using earth-friendly methods and native plants, sculptural pieces and unusual container plantings, and a cottage garden focused around a fountain and large planting beds. Each of these Open Days Program dates is self-guided and no reservations are required. A $5 admission fee collected at each garden supports the national preservation work of the Garden Conservancy. The Open Days program features hundreds of magnificent spaces not normally open to the public. From April through October, garden hosts across the country welcome the opportunity to learn and exchange gardening ideas, and give the public access to explore and enjoy their private gardens. For a complete list of the more than 300 private gardens participating in eighteen states, visit the Garden Conservancy and its Open Days program online at www.opendaysprogram.org or call toll-free weekdays, 1-888-842-2442. The 2013 Open Days Directory ($21.95 including shipping and handling) is the only comprehensive source for details on the 2013 season. The Directory provides descriptions, visiting dates and hours, and driving directions to each private garden. The Directory also includes one free admission ticket to any private garden participating in the program, a $5 value. To purchase a Directory or to join the Garden Conservancy as a member and receive a free copy, call 1-888-842-2442 or visit www.opendaysprogram.org.

MONTHLY MEETINGS

FIRST WEEK

Houston: The Harris County Master Gardeners meet at noon the first Tuesday of each month at the Texas AgriLife Extension, 3033 Bear Creek Drive (near the intersection of Highway 6 and Patterson Road), Houston. For additional information visit http://hcmga.tamu.edu or call 281-855-5600.

Wichita Falls: The Wichita County Master Gardener Association meets at 5:30 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 600 Scott Street, Wichita Falls, on the first Tuesday of each month. For more information, visit www.txmg.org/wichita or call 940-716-8610.

Kilgore: Northeast Texas Organic Gardeners meets at 1 p.m. on the first Wednesday of each month. For more information, call Carole Ramke at 903-986-9475.

New Braunfels: The Comal Master Gardeners meet at 6 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month (except December) at the GVTC Auditorium, 36101 FM 3159, New Braunfels. An educational program preceeds the business meeting. The public is invited to attend. For additional information, call 830-620-3440 or visit http://txmg.org/comal/.

Allen: The Allen Garden Club meets at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month, February through December, at the Allen Heritage Center, 100 E. Main St., Allen. For more information, visit www.allengardenclub.org.

Brownwood: The Brown County Master Gardeners Association meets the first Thursday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 605 Fisk Ave., Brownwood. For further information, call Mary Green Engle at 325-784-8453.

Gonzalas: Gonzales Master Gardeners hold their monthly meeting at noon on the first Thursday of each month at 623 Fair Street, Gonzales. Bring a bag lunch, drinks provided. Contact AgriLife Extension Office at 830-672-8531 or visit http://gonzalesmastergardeners.org for more information.

SECOND WEEK

Austin: Austin Organic Gardeners Club meets at 6:30 p.m. on the second Monday of each month (except December) at the Austin Area Garden Center, 2220 Barton Springs Road, Zilker Botanical Gardens in Austin. For more information, visit www.austinorganicgardeners.org.

Evant: The Evant Garden Club meets on the second Tuesday of each month at 10 a.m., usually at the bank in downtown Evant. To confirm the date, time and place of each month's meeting, call 254-471-5585.

Marion: The Guadalupe County (Schertz/Seguin) Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets on the second Tuesday of each month except July, August and December at St. John’s Lutheran Church in Marion. Directions to St. John’s Lutheran Church: From FM 78 turn south onto FM 465 and the church is just past the Marion School on the right. From IH 10 go north on FM 465 towards Marion. The Church will be on the left, just before you get to town. A plant exchange and meet-and-greet begins at 6:30 p.m. followed by the program at 7 p.m. Visitors are welcome. For more information or an application to join NPSOT visit www.npsot.org/GuadalupeCounty/ or contact guadalupecounty@npsot.org.

Quitman: The Quitman Garden Club meets at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month at the Quitman Library on E Goode Street, Quitman. It is a diverse group that welcomes all visitors.For more information, e-mail quitmangardenclub@gmail.com.

Humble: The Mercer Arboretum & Botanic Garden, 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble, hosts a Lunch Bunch the second Wednesday of each month from noon until 2 p.m. Take a sack lunch or order a box lunch from Starbucks when you call 281-443-8731 to reserve your spot. Master Gardeners and Masters Naturalists may earn CEU credits by attending.

Jacksboro: The Jacksboro Garden Club meets at 9:30 a.m. the second Wednesday of each month (except June, July and August) at the Concerned Citizens Center, 400 East Pine Street, Jacksboro. For more information, call Melinda at 940-567-6218.

Longview: The Gregg County Master Gardeners Association meets the second Wednesday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 405 E. Marshall Ave., Longview. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program preceding the business meeting. For further information call Cindy Gill at 903-236-8429 or visit www.gregg-tx.tamu.edu.

Rockport: The Rockport Herb & Rose Study Group, founded in March 2003, meets the second Wednesday of each month at 10 a.m. at 619 N. Live Oak Street, Room 14, Rockport, to discuss all aspects of using and growing herbs, including historical uses and tips for successful propagation and cultivation. Sometimes they take field trips and have cooking demonstrations in different locations. For more information, contact Linda 361-729-6037, Ruth 361-729-8923 or Cindy 979-562-2153 or visit www.rockportherbs.org and http://rockportherbies.blogspot.com.

Woodway: The McLennan County Master Gardeners meet on the second Wednesday each month at noon at the Carleen Bright Arboretum, 9001 Bosque Blvd., Woodway. Educational programs follow the business session. For more information, call 254-757-5180.

Beaumont: The Jefferson County Master Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the AgriLife Extension Office, 1225 Pearl Street, Suite 200, Beaumont. For more information, call 409-835-8461.

Georgetown: The Williamson County Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the Georgetown Public Library, 402 W. 8th Street. Georgetown. For additional information, contract Billye Adams at 512-863-9636 or visit http://www.npsot.org/WilliamsonCounty/default.htm.

Orange: The Orange County Master Gardeners Association holds their monthly meeting on the second Thursday of each month. A short program is presented. The meeting starts at 6:30 p.m. at the Salvation Army Bldg. cor. MLK & Strickland in Orange. Pot luck supper at 6 p.m. Visit http://txmg.org/orange for more information.

San Antonio: The San Antonio Herb Society meets at 7 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month at the San Antonio Garden Center, 3310 N. New Braunfels (corner of Funston & N. New Braunfels). For more information on programs, visit www.sanantonioherbs.org.

Angleton: The Brazoria County Master Gardeners meet at 11 a.m. on the second Friday of each month at the Brazoria County Extension Office, 21017 County Road 171, Angleton. There is a general business meeting followed by a brief educational program each month. For further information call 979-864-1558, ext.110.

College Station: The A&M Garden Club meets on the second Friday of each month during the school year at 9:30 a.m. in the training room of the College Station Waste Water Facility building at the end of North Forest Parkway, College Station. Expert speakers, plant sharing, and federated club projects help members learn about gardening in the Brazos Valley, floral design, conservation, and more. For more information, visit http://www.amgardenclub.com/.

Houston: The Spring Branch African Violet Club meets the second Saturday of each month, January through November, at 10:30am at the Copperfield Baptist Church, 8350 Highway 6 North, Houston. Call Karla at 281-748-8417 prior to attending to confirm meeting date and time.

Dallas: The Rainbow Garden Club of North Texas meets the second Sunday of each month at 2 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Meetings are held at member’s homes and garden centers around the area. For more information, visit www.RainbowGardenClub.com.

THIRD WEEK

Arlington: The Arlington Men's Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the third Monday of each month (except December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact Lance Jepson at LJepson@aol.com.

Cleburne: The Johnson County Master Gardeners meet at 2 p.m. on the third Monday of each month at McGregor House, 1628 W. Henderson, Cleburne, which includes a program and a meet & greet. For more information, call Sharon Smith at 817-894-7700.

Corpus Christi: The Nueces Master Gardeners meet at noon the third Tuesday of each month, except December, at Garden Senior Center, 5325 Greely Dr., Corpus Christi. An educational program precedes the business meeting. For further information call 361 767-5217.

Rockport: Monthly meetings of the Aransas/San Patricio Master Gardeners are held at 10 a.m. on the third Tuesday of each month at Texas AgriLife Extension Service - Aransas County Office, 892 Airport Rd., Rockport. For additional information, e-mail aransas-tx@tamu.edu or call 361-790-0103.

Sugar Land: The Sugar Land Garden Club meets on the third Tuesday of each month, September through November and January through April at 10 a.m. at the Sugar Land Community Center, 226 Matlage Way, Sugar Land. The club hosts a different speaker each month. For more information, visit www.sugarlandgardenclub.org.

Denton: The Denton Organic Society, a group devoted to sharing information and educating the public regarding organic principles, meets the third Wednesday of each month (except July, August and December) at the Denton Senior Center, 509 N. Bell Avenue. Meetings are free and open to the public. Meetings begin at 7 p.m. and are preceded by a social at 6:30. For more information, call 940-382-8551.

Glen Rose: The Somervell County Master Gardeners meet at 10 a.m., the third Wednesday of each month at the Somervell County AgriLife Extension office, 1405 Texas Drive, Glen Rose. Visitors are welcome. For more information, call 254-897-2809 or visit www.somervellmastergardeners.org.

Granbury: The Lake Granbury Master Gardeners meet at 1 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at the Hood County Annex 1, 1410 West Pearl Street, Granbury. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program each month preceding the business meeting. For information on topics call 817-579-3280 or visit http://www.hoodcountymastergardeners.org/.

Seabrook: The Harris County Precinct 2 Master Gardeners hold an educational program at 10 a.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at The Meeting Room at Clear Lake Park (on the Lakeside), 5001 NASA Road 1, Seabrook. The programs are free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu.

Brownwood: Brownwood Garden Club meets the third Thursday of each month, 11:30 a.m.– 1 p.m.  The club meetings are at Southside Baptist Church, 1219 Indian Creek Road, with refreshments and a speaker presentation. Visitors are welcome. For more information, email boeblingen@centex.net or call 817-454-8175).

Houston: The Native Plant Society of Texas — Houston (NPSOT-H) meets at 7:30 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except for October (4th Thursday) and December (2nd Thursday). Location varies. For locations, for more information on programs, and for information about native plants for Houston, visit http://www.npsot.org/Houston.

Rosenberg: The Fort Bend Master Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except December at the Bud O’Shieles Community Center located at 1330 Band Road, Rosenberg. For more information, call 281-341-7068 or visit www.fbmg.com.

Seguin: The Guadalupe County Master Gardeners meets at 7 p.m. the third Thursday of each month, except June and December, at the Texas AgriLife Extension Bldg. at 210 E. Live Oak, Seguin. An educational program precedes the business meeting. The public is invited to attend. For topic or other information, call 830-379-1972 or visit www.guadalupecountymastergardeners.org.

FOURTH WEEK

Brackenridge Park: The Native Plant Society San Antonio Chapter meets every fourth Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. in the Lions Field Adult and Senior Center, 2809 Broadway at E. Mulberry, Brackenridge Park, except August and December. Social and seed/plant exchange at 6:30 p.m. Free and open to the public. For more information, contact Bea at 210-999-7292 or visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio.

Bryan: The Brazos County Master Gardeners, a program of Texas AgriLife Extension, meet the fourth Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. at the Brazos Center, 3232 Briarcrest Drive, Bryan. There is a public gardening program at each meeting and pertinent information may be found at brazosmg.com or 979-823-0129.

Edna: The Jackson County Master Gardeners present their "Come Grown With Us" seminars on the fourth Tuesday of each month, January through October, beginning at 7 p.m. at 411 N. Wells, Edna. The seminars are free, open to the public and offer 2 CEU hours to Master Gardeners or others requiring them. For additional information, contact the Jackson County Extension Office at 361-782-3312.

Linden: The Caddo Wildflower Chapter of Native Plants Society meets the fourth Tuesday of each month at the senior citizens building at 507 S Kaufman St. in Linden at 6:30. Visitors are welcome. For additional information, contact Karen Tromza at khtromza@yahoo.com.

Fort Worth: The Organic Garden Club of Forth Worth meets at 7 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday of each month except July and December at the Deborah Beggs Moncrief Garden Center, 3220 Botanic Blvd., Ft. Worth. Refreshments are served. For more information, call 817-263-9322 or visit www.ogcfw.webs.com.

San Antonio: The Native Plant Society of Texas San Antonio Chapter meets the fourth Tuesday of each month, except August and December, at the Lions Field Adult & Senior Center, 2809 Broadway, San Antonio. Social and plant/seed exchange at 6:30 p.m., program at 7:00 p.m. For more information, visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio or call Bea at 210-999-7292.

Houston: The Houston Chapter of the Native Prairie Association of Texas (HNPAT) meets from 7 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. the fourth Wednesday of each month at Bayland Park Community Center, 6400 Bissonnet, Houston. For more information, contact hnpat@prairies.org.

Leander: The Leander Garden Club meets on the fourth Thursday of each month (except July and August) at 10:30 a.m. at the community room behind the Greater Texas Federal Credit Union,1300 N. Bell, Cedar Park, unless there is special event planned. Following a program and short business meeting, we share a pot-luck luncheon. To confirm the meeting place and time, please call president Cathy Clark-Ramsey at 512-963-4698 or email info@leandergc.org.

Dallas: The Greater Dallas Organic Garden Club meets at 7:00 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of each month at the REI, 4515 LBJ Freeway, Dallas. For more information, call 214-824-2448 or visit www.gdogc.org.

Arlington: The Arlington Organic Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the last Thursday of each month (except November and December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact David at 817-483-7746.


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Texas Gardener’s Seeds is published weekly. © Suntex Communications, Inc. 2013. All rights reserved. You may forward this publication to your friends and colleagues if it is sent in its entirety. No individual part of this newsletter may be reproduced in any manner without prior written permission from the publisher.

Missed an issue? Back issues of Texas Gardener’s Seeds are available at www.texasgardener.com/newsletters.

Publisher: Chris S. Corby ● Editor: Michael Bracken

Texas Gardener’s Seeds, P.O. Box 9005, Waco, Texas 76714 ● www.TexasGardener.com