July 3, 2013

Welcome to Texas Gardener’s Seeds, the weekly newsletter for Texas gardeners. Please do not reply to this e-mail because the sending address is not monitored. See the bottom of this newsletter for information on how to subscribe, unsubscribe, or contact the editor.


The garden reader
The bones of our gardening preferences

By William Scheick
Book Reviewer

Thomas J. Mickey. America’s Romance with the English Garden. Ohio University Press, 2013. 272 pp. $26.95.

It’s been no secret for some time now that our fixation on traditional lawns is actually a European legacy. It is especially based on expensive examples of English manors attended by hired gardeners.

It’s less well known that other ways we typically garden — the bones of our gardening preferences — also imitate English models. In fact, from the late 19th century onwards, much of American home-gardening behavior has been conditioned by English practices strategically marketed to make us feel modern, progressive and even materially better off than our neighbors.

With admirable ease and lucidity in America’s Romance with the English Garden, Thomas Mickey reveals the historical development of these strategies aimed at middle-class Americans anxious for enhanced social status.

English manor-style lawns, it turns out, were only part of the idealized portrait painted by seed companies. By the end of the 19th century flowers had entered the picture, too.

Earlier in that century, edible plants dominated gardens. Later, images of homes landscaped with flowers grown for only their beauty were promoted as signs of American modernity, progress and advanced civilization.

Often the flowers recommended for American gardens had to have English cultural approval. The flowers might actually be American in origin, but to qualify for status gardening they had to shed their humble native identity by first becoming gentrified in English gardens.

Quite a number of American native plants underwent this transformation in status.

My favorite — it makes me laugh just to think about it — is trumpet creeper (Campsis radicans). As any Texan who has trumpet creeper knows, this hummingbird-charmer remains an unmannerly, transgressive rascal that never knows its proper place.

Various fruits and vegetables underwent social transformations, too. Mickey details, for example, the short rise to fame of the ‘Manchester’ strawberry during the 1880s. At first touted as “the greatest strawberry on earth” and said to be successfully “growing in almost every country on the face of the earth,” within a few years it silently (and rightly) lost its place in nursery catalogs.

These catalogs, like the advertisements nurseries placed in increasingly popular magazines at the end of the 19th century, tended to offer magical realism instead of down-to-earth advice. Such ads could hardly be trusted.

Sometimes other plant-growers bucked trendy hype and tried to educate their catalog readers: “We do not advertise in these pages any such miserable ‘novelties’ that are displayed in catalogs of the trashy order — ‘Roses of Jericho,’ at which a Syrian camel-driver would scorn to look twice, or any ‘Boss’ watermelon of impossible size.”

Mickey devotes an entire chapter to major themes in the nursery catalogs and a separate chapter (a discussion I especially enjoyed) on the ‘Crimson Rambler,’ the alleged “grandest rose of the century.” America’s Romance with the English Garden is not only an informative delight to read, it is also (as suits a book about gardens) a delight to the eyes.



Grasshoppers. (Photo courtesy of Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service)
Grasshoppers break out — but not as copiously as in 2011

By Robert Burns
Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service

After a dry winter, as expected, grasshoppers are becoming a problem, but they are not as severe or profuse as they were during the 2011 drought, according to a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service expert.

“It’s mid-summer and the grasshoppers have gotten bigger; they’re now winged, so they’re moving into other crops and orchards,” said Dr. Allen Knutson, an AgriLife Extension entomologist, Dallas.

As they were in 2011, this year’s grasshopper outbreaks are connected to drought conditions, he said. From July through the fall, grasshoppers deposit their eggs 0.5 to 2 inches below the soil surface. On an average year, fungus and other diseases take a toll on egg survival, thereby reducing the first generation grasshoppers that hatch in the spring.

But most of the fungi and diseases affecting egg survival depend upon moist conditions, so during a drought year, outbreaks are expected, Knutson said.

But the outbreaks this year — at least so far — have been spotty, he said.

“Though some areas have had good rains, which reduce grasshopper populations, others have not, and they’ll still have problems,” he said. “They are intense in some areas, while others don’t have any.”

Reports from AgriLife Extension county agents support Knutson’s account.

Logan Lair, AgriLife Extension agent in Navarro County, northeast of Waco, reported, “Grasshoppers, grasshoppers, grasshoppers; they are back and with a vengeance. This is affecting hay production.”

Heath Lusty, AgriLife Extension agent in Lampasas County, north of Austin, reported that along with hot, dry, windy conditions, “grasshoppers are a serious issue in some parts of the county.”

In East Texas, where grasshopper infestations were especially severe in 2011, there was only one county reporting outbreaks in June, that of Rich Hirsch, AgriLife Extension agent in Henderson County, west of Tyler.

More information on the current Texas drought and wildfire alerts can be found on the AgriLife Extension Agricultural Drought Task Force website at http://agrilife.tamu.edu/drought/.


Burpee offers seed starter kit to benefit American Heart Association's Teaching Gardens Program

Burpee

The nation's leading home gardening company, W. Atlee Burpee & Co. has joined forces with the American Heart Association’s Teaching Garden program by launching the Teaching Gardens At Home seed starter kit, aimed at promoting healthy behaviors among young people and their families.

George Ball, chairman and CEO of Burpee explains, "Burpee is proud to join the American Heart Association’s Teaching Gardens in giving more children hands-on gardening experience to reinforce the essential connection between whole foods, our health and well being.”

The Teaching Gardens At Home starter kit was created between Pennsylvania-based Burpee and the American Heart Association. Each seed starter kit contains 12 favorite Burpee vegetable seed packets, complemented by eight recipes using fresh ingredients from the garden and approved by the American Heart Association. Burpee has agreed to donate $1.50 to the American Heart Association for every Teaching Gardens At Home kit sold on its website, www.Burpee.com.

The seed starter kit will benefit and enhance the Teaching Garden’s mission to cultivate home gardening where children and their families can learn to grow their own vegetables and prepare delicious, heart-healthy meals.

The Teaching Gardens program provides a practical learning experience rooted in offering nutritional choices. "Garden-based nutrition intervention programs can promote increased fruit and vegetable intake among children,” said Kelly Meyer, Teaching Gardens co-founder. "By planting a seed in nutrient rich soil — gathering energy from the sun, watering and taking care of a garden — children can learn about the natural benefits of whole foods."

Since 2011, more than 200 Teaching Gardens have been funded nationwide. Many have been planted in schools of great need where the Teaching Gardens provide participating students with the only available interaction between nature and fresh produce.

For more information about the Teaching Garden program, visit www.heart.org/teachinggardens.


The compost heap
Loves dos and don'ts

"Love, love, love your list of Dos and Don'ts," writes Cynthia Wilson. "These are so concise and helpful. You should consider making this a part of every issue of SEEDS. Thanks for your wonderful and inspiring help! Especially here in drought-ridden Texas! I think the gardener's mantra here should be, 'Maybe next year!'"

Thank you, Cynthia. Tom is hard at work on another list for us. — Michael Bracken, editor

"My garden had root-knot nematodes," writes William Stone. "I could hardly grow okra, beets, carrots and chard. SEEDS December 29, 2010, suggested a product called Actinovate. This product regularly applied to the soil is cost-effective and radically diminishes the root-knot pest. Now even my okra is A-OK. Thanks."

Thank you for letting us know that useful information is buried in our back issues. New readers who would like to read back issues of SEEDS can find them at http://www.texasgardener.com/newsletters/default.aspx. — Michael Bracken, editor


Gardening tips

When you remove those spent crops like green beans and squash from your garden, work some compost into the soil. If you plan to wait a while to replant with fall crops, cover the soil with mulch to keep weeds from sprouting.

Have a favorite gardening tip you’d like to share? Texas Gardener’s Seeds is seeking brief gardening tips from Texas gardeners to use in future issues. If we publish your tip in Seeds, we will send you a free Texas Gardener 2013 Planning Guide & Calendar. Please send your tips of 50 words or less to the editor at: Gardening Tips.


Did you know...

Our beloved crapemyrtle got its common name for its resemblance to the true myrtle (no relation) and its crape-like flowers.


Upcoming garden events

If you would like your organization’s events included in "Upcoming Garden Events" or would like to make a change to a listed event, please contact us at Garden Events. To ensure inclusion in this column, please provide complete details at least three weeks prior to the event.

JULY

Woodway: Midsummer Nights, a free annual concert series, returns to the Carleen Bright Arboretum, 1 Pavilion Way, Woodway. Bring a lawn chair or blanket and get ready to relax to some great music! July 3: Texas Country Gentlemen. All concerts are from 8 p.m. until 9 p.m. Bring a lawn chair or blanket and get ready to relax to some great music! Covered seating available for the Dessert Fundraiser, $10.00. For more information, call 254-399-9204.

Austin: Marjory Wildcraft, author, speaker, and counselor on self-sufficient living, will share her recent discoveries regarding sustainable agriculture in Cuba on Monday, July 8, at The Austin Organic Gardeners Club meeting at Austin Area Garden Center, 2220 Barton Springs Rd, in Zilker Botanical Gardens. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. for the opportunity to meet and mingle with local gardeners; club business begins at 7 p.m., followed by our guest speaker's presentation. Bring a little cash for the raffle and/or to purchase one of Marjory's DVDs! For more information, visit www.austinorganicgardeners.org.

Dallas: Sprinkler System Basics. This program teaches the very basic understanding of how your home sprinkler system operates, programming the controller, and making minor repairs. A properly functioning sprinkler system saves you time, plants, money, and water! Cost: FREE Tuesday, July 9, 10 a.m. – noon. Class is located at Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center, Building C, 17360 Coit Road, Dallas. For addition information, call 972-952-9671. Register for class at http://dallas.tamu.edu/courses/.

Dallas: Sprinkler System Basics. This program teaches the very basic understanding of how your home sprinkler system operates, programming the controller, and making minor repairs. A properly functioning sprinkler system saves you time, plants, money, and water! Cost: FREE Tuesday, July 9, 6 p.m. - 8 p.m. Class is located at Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center, Building C, 17360 Coit Road, Dallas. For addition information, call 972-952-9671. Register for class at http://dallas.tamu.edu/courses/.

Fort Worth: Learn about “Container, Chair and Fairy Gardens” at a lecture and show and tell, Tuesday, July 9, 10 a.m. – noon in the Magnolia Room of the 2300 Building, 2300 Circle Drive, at the Fort Worth Resource Connection. The Resource Connection is located off Campus Dr, north from I-20. Look for the Resource Connection signs on Campus Drive . Cost is $5 and class limit is 40. Pre-registration is required. To register and for more information/directions, contact Billie Hammack at blhammack@ag.tamu.edu or call 817-884-1296.

Humble: Greg Harmison, horticulture coordinator at Jesse Jones Park, provides planting ideas for the hot summer season when he discusses blooming Shrubs summer to fall, Wed., July 10, noon – 2 p.m. at Mercer Arboretum & Botanic Gardens, 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble. For additional information, call 281-443-8731 or visit www.hcp4.net/mercer.

New Braunfels: Glenn Avriett, former County Agent for Comal AgriLife A&M Extension Office, will present “Rainwater Harvesting,” covering all aspects of rain collection and making a barrel, at 6:30 p.m., Wednesday, July 10, at the GVTC Auditorium, 36101 FM 3159, New Braunfels. The public is welcome at this free event.

San Antonio: Bexar County Master Gardeners will meet on Thursday, July 11, with the social beginning at 6 p.m. and the presentation following at 6:30-8:30 p.m. Douglas Tomasini will speak and share growing hints on plants that are rare in the local markets but do well in Central Texas landscapes. He will bring plants to examine and will provide some plants for a raffle. The meeting will be held at 3355 Cherry Ridge Drive, Suite 208, San Antonio, is open to the public and is free of cost. For more information, contact Lisa Nixon at 210-364-7844 or email lisa.nixon@bexarcountymastergardeners.org.

Fort Worth: “Fall Vegetable Gardening” will be discussed on Saturday, July 13, 10 a.m.- noon at the Fort Worth Resource Connection, Building 2300, Magnolia Room, 2300 Circle Drive. The Resource Connection is located off Campus Dr, north from I-20. Look for the Resource Connection signs on Campus Drive . Class fee is $5 and the class is limited to 40. Pre-registration is required. To To register and for more information/directions, contact Billie Hammack at blhammack@ag.tamu.edu or call 817-884-1296.

Humble: Texas Rose Rustlers Meet Saturday, July 13, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Mercer Arboretum & Botanic Gardens, 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble. This Rookie Rustler meeting is open to the public in order to help enthusiasts learn the etiquette of rustling old garden roses, how to propagate from cuttings and then grow their favorite flower. Visit www.texasroserustlers.com for more details or call 281-443-8731.

La Marque: Galveston County Master Gardener Anna Wygrys will present “A Homeowner’s Guide to Weed Control,” 9:00 a.m.-11:30 a.m., Saturday, July 13, at Galveston County AgriLife Extension Office in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (FM 519), La Marque. Do you have a bumper crop of something growing in your yard that you did not plant? Is your lawn more weeds than grass? What can you do about the problem weeds that are taking over your yard and garden? Wygrys will include common species identification, integrated weed management plus chemical options, and practical solutions for controlling weeds in the home landscape. This program is free to the public. For course reservations, call 281-534-3413, ext. 12 or email GALV3@wt.net.

Houston: The Harris County Master Gardeners at Precinct 2 will be hosting Open Garden Days twice monthly during the summer months on the 1st & 3rd Mondays, from 8:30 a.m. - 11 a.m. at Genoa Friendship Garden, 1202 Genoa Red Bluff, Houston. Master Gardeners will be on hand to answer your gardening questions and will present educational programs from 9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. for children & adults. Selected herbs and other plants are available for sale in the Greenhouse. Monday, July 15, both children and adults will learn about “Herbs.” Free and open to the public, children welcome! For additional information, visit http://hcmga.tamu.edu.

Dallas: Controlling Your Irrigation Controller. This program teaches how you how to program or reprogram your irrigation controller, the best and most efficient way to irrigate your landscape, the soak and cycle method as well as general landscape water efficiency practices to conserve water. Cost: FREE Tuesday, July 16, 10 a.m. - noon. Class is located at Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center, Building C, 17360 Coit Road, Dallas. For addition information, call 972-952-9671. Register for class at http://dallas.tamu.edu/courses/.

Dallas: Controlling Your Irrigation Controller. This program teaches how you how to program or reprogram your irrigation controller, the best and most efficient way to irrigate your landscape, the soak and cycle method as well as general landscape water efficiency practices to conserve water. Cost: FREE Tuesday, July 16, 6 p.m. - 8 p.m. Class is located at Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center, Building C, 17360 Coit Road, Dallas. For addition information, call 972-952-9671. Register for class at http://dallas.tamu.edu/courses/.

Seabrook: John Ferguson, Founder and Owner of Nature's Way Resources, will discuss how the environment can affect our health at 10 a.m., Wednesday, July 17, at The Meeting Room at Clear Lake Park (on the lakeside), 5001 NASA Parkway, Seabrook. Ferguson holds an MS degree in Physics and Geology and is a licensed Soil Scientist in Texas. Free and open to the public. For additional information, visit http://hcmga.tamu.edu.

Bryan: “Fall Vegetable Gardening – You Can Dig It!” will be held from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m., Saturday, July 20, at Brazos Center, 3232 Briarcrest Dr., Bryan. Speakers Margrit Moores & Kate Kelly, both master gardeners, will focus on the fall vegetable garden. Sessions include “Beginnings: Sun, Soil, Water, and Mulch”; “Taking Root: Plant Varieties, Planting Schedule, and Planting Combinations”; and “Gathering the Harvest: Increasing Yield and Extending the Season”; and there will be demonstrations of must-have garden equipment. Pre-Register to attend: $35 per person includes handouts & refreshments. Registration preferred by July 17. Registration form is available on the Brazos County Master Gardeners website at brazosmg.com. For additional information, visit brazosmg.com or call 979-823-0129.

Fort Worth: Make your own Glass Totems at a class on Saturday, July 20, 10 a.m.-noon, at the Fort Worth Resource Connection, Building 2300, Magnolia Room, 2300 Circle Drive. The Resource Connection is located off Campus Dr, north from I-20. Look for the Resource Connection signs on Campus Drive . Cost is $25 and class limit is 20. Pre-registration is required. To register and for more information/directions, contact Billie Hammack at blhammack@ag.tamu.edu or call 817-884-1296.

Kaufman: The Fall Vegetable Seminar will be presented Saturday, July 20, at the 1st Baptist Fellowship Hall, Northeast corner of Washington and Chestnut, in Kaufman. Registration begins at 8 a.m. and presentations begin at 9 a.m. and continue until noon. Kaufman County Master Gardeners will present "Fall Planting: What to Plant & Where to Find It"; Susan Clark and Arlene Hamilton, Ellis County Master Gardeners, will present "Mediterranean Herbs"; Renee Word, Kaufman County Master Gardener, will present "Canning Your Harvest"; and John Lawler, Owner-Operator of Worm Wranglers, will present "Vermicomposting & Soil Preparation." Admission is $5 per person. For additional information and to pre-register, call 972-932-9069 or email sbburden@ag.tamu.edu.

Schertz: The Guadalupe County Master Gardeners is taking applications for their Class 25. The dates of the class are each Wednesday from August 7 to November 20. The class will be held at the Schertz United Methodist Church, 3460 Roy Richards Drive (FM 3009), Schertz from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. The deadline for registration is July 20 and the cost is $190.00 per person. For an application, visit www.guadalupecountymastergardeners.org and click the link on the main page to download the application form. For additional information, contact the Class Coordinator Bob Teweles at rteweles@att.net or 210-289-9979.

Dallas: Drip Irrigation DIY. This program teaches how to install a drip irrigation system from your faucet or how to convert an existing system to drip. Drip irrigation is the most efficient irrigation method and essential to sustainable landscapes. Drip irrigation for foundation watering will also be covered. Cost: FREE Tuesday, July 23, 10 a.m. – noon. Class is located at Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center, Building C, 17360 Coit Road, Dallas. For addition information, call 972-952-9671. Register for class at http://dallas.tamu.edu/courses/.

Dallas: Drip Irrigation DIY. This program teaches how to install a drip irrigation system from your faucet or how to convert an existing system to drip. Drip irrigation is the most efficient irrigation method and essential to sustainable landscapes. Drip irrigation for foundation watering will also be covered. Cost: FREE Tuesday, July 23, 6 p.m. - 8 p.m. Class is located at Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center, Building C, 17360 Coit Road, Dallas. For addition information, call 972-952-9671. Register for class at http://dallas.tamu.edu/courses/.

Fort Worth: Children, parents and grandparents are invited to learn about “Fall Vegetable Gardening” from Master Gardener vegetable specialists at the Fort Worth Botanic Garden Backyard Vegetable Garden (formerly children’s vegetable garden), Tuesday, July 23, 10 a.m. Cost: $10 per adult; $5 per child. Class limit: 20. Children must be five years or older and must be accompanied by a parent or grandparent. Pre-registration is required. To register and for more information/directions, contact Billie Hammack at blhammack@ag.tamu.edu or call 817-884-1296.

Fort Worth: Make a Butterfly Puddler at the Fort Worth Botanic Garden/Tarrant County Master Gardener classes for families, Saturday, July 27, 10 a.m. at the FWBG Backyard Vegetable Garden (formerly children’s vegetable garden) pavilion. Cost: $10 per adult; $5 per child. Materials: $15 per family. Class limit: 20. Children must be five years or older and must be accompanied by a parent or grandparent. Pre-registration is required. To register and for more information/directions, contact Billie Hammack at blhammack@ag.tamu.edu or call 817-884-1296.

Humble: Summer Color Conference and Plant Sale will be held Saturday, July 27, 8 a.m. – 3 p.m. at Mercer Arboretum & Botanic Gardens, 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble. Splash into summer with this one-day immersion into perfect solutions for gardening in the heat. Mercer’s Director Darrin Duling will conduct a tour of the heat-loving plants in the gardens. Conference participants can take advantage of a plant sale that morning, which opens later in the day to the public. Reservations and a fee are required, so call 281-443-8731 for additional details.

Dallas: Irrigation Quick Fixes. This program teaches the very basic repairs to home automatic irrigation system. A properly functioning sprinkler system saves you time, money, and water! Cost: FREE Tuesday, July 30, 10 a.m. – noon. Class is located at Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center, Building C, 17360 Coit Road, Dallas. For addition information, call 972-952-9671. Register for class at http://dallas.tamu.edu/courses/.

Dallas: Irrigation Quick Fixes. This program teaches the very basic repairs to home automatic irrigation system. A properly functioning sprinkler system saves you time, money, and water! Cost: FREE Tuesday, July 30, 6 p.m. - 8 p.m. Class is located at Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center, Building C, 17360 Coit Road, Dallas. For addition information, call 972-952-9671. Register for class at http://dallas.tamu.edu/courses/.

San Antonio: "Selecting Texas Superstar Plants for Your Landscape" will be presented Tuesday, July 30, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service Horticulturist David Rodriguez and Dr. Jerry Parsons, retired Extension Horticulturist, will talk about the history of Texas Superstar plants and the advantage of selecting these plants for use in your landscape. This presentation is open to the public and will be held at 3355 Cherry Ridge Drive, Suite 208, San Antonio. Registration fee of $10 may be paid at the door. For more information and to RSVP, contact Angel Torres at 210-467-6575.

AUGUST

Dallas: Rainwater Harvesting-Rain Barrel. This program covers the basics and benefits of rainwater harvesting and the effects stormwater has on the environment. Participants will learn how to collect and utilize rainwater at home and have the opportunity to construct their very own 55 gallon rain barrel. Cost: $50 per Barrel Tuesday, August 6, 6 p.m. - 8 p.m. Class is located at Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center, Building C, 17360 Coit Road, Dallas. For addition information, call 972-952-9671. Register for class at http://dallas.tamu.edu/courses/.

Humble: As a county extension agent for many years, Tom Leroy has experienced every question about handling lawn care and what to do about those hard to manage spots needing easy ground cover. Join him as he makes the green monster manageable when he discusses lawns and alternations, Wednesday, August 14, noon – 2 p.m. at Mercer Arboretum & Botanic Gardens, 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble. For additional information, call 281-443-8731 or visit www.hcp4.net/mercer.

Seguin: The Guadalupe Master Gardeners will meet on Thursday, August 22, at the AgriLife Building on 210 E. Live Oak, Seguin. Dr. Rebecca Kelso will discuss "Preventing Skin Cancer" beginning at 7 p.m. The meeting is free and open to the public. The regular business meeting will be at the end of the program. For further information, visit www.guadalupemastergardeners.org.

SEPTEMBER

Dallas: “Vegetable Garden-Fall” will be presented September 4, 10 a.m. until noon, at 17360 Coit Road, Dallas. This program teaches homeowners the proper time to germinate fall vegetable seeds and/or when to transplant fall vegetables into their vegetable garden. It also teaches proper soil preparation, insect and disease and weed control. For more information and to register, visit http://dallas.tamu.edu or email urbanwater@tamu.edu.

Nacogdoches/Arcadia: Naked Ladies and Oxbloods: SFA Gardens Arcadian Fall Bulb Bus Tour, September 14. Visit Texas Gardener columnist Greg Grant’s Emanis House dogtrot in Shelby County’s rural community of Arcadia. Depending on the weather, see red oxblood lilies (Rhodophiala), several different colors of spider lilies (Lycoris), or assorted rain lilies (Cooperia, Zephyranthes, and Habranthus). Unfortunately their display depends on the first fall rains so a grand naturalized bulb display isn’t guaranteed. Visit Grant’s old family home with an open breezeway running through it, along with his small cottage garden, chickens, and bluebird houses. Dress comfortably for potentially hot weather. The bus tour will be from 9 a.m. until noon. All participants will meet at the SFA Ag building, Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacognoches, at 9 a.m. $25 for Friends of SFA Gardens members, $30 for non-members. For more information and reservations contact Elyce Rodwald at 936-468-1832 or erodewald@sfasu.edu. Other SFA Gardens events and information can be found at sfagardens.sfasu.edu.

Dallas: After many years of research and construction, the Dallas Arboretum, 8525 Garland Road, Dallas will open the Rory Meyer's Children's Adventure Garden on Saturday, September, 21. The 8-acre garden will feature over 150 interactive exhibits including areas to explain how energy comes from water, the sun and wind; a wetland where children will learn to do pond dippings and read animal tracks; a Texas Skywalk will feature a look at life in the tree tops and inside a tree itself; a Discovery Center that will include a 30ft globe that will show Pangaea, the solar system and major weather events. Autumn at the Arboretum will also open on Saturday, September 21.

OCTOBER

Jasper: Master Gardener plant sale at the Butterfly Festival & Fall Fest in downtown Jasper, October 5. Butterfly Festival includes free programs on how to attract pollinators to your garden, the monarch migration and more; free children's activities, scavenger hunt and several butterfly releases. In the butterfly garden learn about host plants for different species and organic control methods for unwanted pests. For more information contact the Texas A&M AgriLife office at 409-384-3721 or visit jasper.agrilife.org.

Nacogdoches: The SFA Gardens at Stephen F. Austin State University will host its annual Fabulous Fall Festival Plant Sale from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. Saturday, October 5, at the SFA Pineywoods Native Plant Center, 2900 Raguet St. in historic Nacogdoches. A wide variety of hard-to-find, “Texas tough” plants will be available, including Texas natives, heirlooms, tropicals, perennials, shrubs, trees, and exclusive Greg Grant and SFA introductions. Most of the plants are extensively trialed in the gardens before being offered to the public and most are produced by the SFA Gardens staff and volunteers. This popular event benefits the SFA Mast Arboretum, Pineywoods Native Plant Center, Ruby M. Mize Azalea Garden, Gayla Mize Garden, and educational programs hosted at the gardens. The educational programs at SFA Gardens reach more than 15,000 students ages 1 to 100 on a yearly basis. The public is encouraged to arrive early and bring a wagon. For more information, call (936) 468-4404, or visit www.sfagardens.sfasu.edu two weeks before the sale for a list of available plants.

Dallas: “Trees for North Texas” will be presented October 8, 6 p.m. until 7 p.m. at 17360 Coit Road, Dallas. This program teaches proper tree selection and planting for North Texas. Selecting the right tree and planting it properly helps improve the sustainability of your home or business landscape. Tree list provided. For more information and to register, visit http://dallas.tamu.edu or email urbanwater@tamu.edu.

Houston/Ft. Worth: A total of 10 Texas gardeners will share their private gardens with the public in 2013 through the Garden Conservancy’s Open Days program, America’s only national private garden-visiting program. Open Days in Texas take place on the following dates. Sunday, October 13: Visit four private gardens open in Fort Worth, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Features include a country estate with formal spaces and an organic orchard, an urban garden using earth-friendly methods and native plants, sculptural pieces and unusual container plantings, and a cottage garden focused around a fountain and large planting beds. Each of these Open Days Program dates is self-guided and no reservations are required. A $5 admission fee collected at each garden supports the national preservation work of the Garden Conservancy. The Open Days program features hundreds of magnificent spaces not normally open to the public. From April through October, garden hosts across the country welcome the opportunity to learn and exchange gardening ideas, and give the public access to explore and enjoy their private gardens. For a complete list of the more than 300 private gardens participating in eighteen states, visit the Garden Conservancy and its Open Days program online at www.opendaysprogram.org or call toll-free weekdays, 1-888-842-2442. The 2013 Open Days Directory ($21.95 including shipping and handling) is the only comprehensive source for details on the 2013 season. The Directory provides descriptions, visiting dates and hours, and driving directions to each private garden. The Directory also includes one free admission ticket to any private garden participating in the program, a $5 value. To purchase a Directory or to join the Garden Conservancy as a member and receive a free copy, call 1-888-842-2442 or visit www.opendaysprogram.org.

MONTHLY MEETINGS

FIRST WEEK

Houston: The Harris County Master Gardeners meet at noon the first Tuesday of each month at the Texas AgriLife Extension, 3033 Bear Creek Drive (near the intersection of Highway 6 and Patterson Road), Houston. For additional information visit http://hcmga.tamu.edu or call 281-855-5600.

Wichita Falls: The Wichita County Master Gardener Association meets at 5:30 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 600 Scott Street, Wichita Falls, on the first Tuesday of each month. For more information, visit www.txmg.org/wichita or call 940-716-8610.

Kilgore: Northeast Texas Organic Gardeners meets at 1 p.m. on the first Wednesday of each month. For more information, call Carole Ramke at 903-986-9475.

New Braunfels: The Comal Master Gardeners meet at 6 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month (except December) at the GVTC Auditorium, 36101 FM 3159, New Braunfels. An educational program preceeds the business meeting. The public is invited to attend. For additional information, call 830-620-3440 or visit http://txmg.org/comal/.

Allen: The Allen Garden Club meets at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month, February through December, at the Allen Heritage Center, 100 E. Main St., Allen. For more information, visit www.allengardenclub.org.

Brownwood: The Brown County Master Gardeners Association meets the first Thursday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 605 Fisk Ave., Brownwood. For further information, call Mary Green Engle at 325-784-8453.

Gonzalas: Gonzales Master Gardeners hold their monthly meeting at noon on the first Thursday of each month at 623 Fair Street, Gonzales. Bring a bag lunch, drinks provided. Contact AgriLife Extension Office at 830-672-8531 or visit http://gonzalesmastergardeners.org for more information.

SECOND WEEK

Austin: Austin Organic Gardeners Club meets at 6:30 p.m. on the second Monday of each month (except December) at the Austin Area Garden Center, 2220 Barton Springs Road, Zilker Botanical Gardens in Austin. For more information, visit www.austinorganicgardeners.org.

Evant: The Evant Garden Club meets on the second Tuesday of each month at 10 a.m., usually at the bank in downtown Evant. To confirm the date, time and place of each month's meeting, call 254-471-5585.

Marion: The Guadalupe County (Schertz/Seguin) Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets on the second Tuesday of each month except July, August and December at St. John’s Lutheran Church in Marion. Directions to St. John’s Lutheran Church: From FM 78 turn south onto FM 465 and the church is just past the Marion School on the right. From IH 10 go north on FM 465 towards Marion. The Church will be on the left, just before you get to town. A plant exchange and meet-and-greet begins at 6:30 p.m. followed by the program at 7 p.m. Visitors are welcome. For more information or an application to join NPSOT visit www.npsot.org/GuadalupeCounty/ or contact guadalupecounty@npsot.org.

Quitman: The Quitman Garden Club meets at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month at the Quitman Library on E Goode Street, Quitman. It is a diverse group that welcomes all visitors. For more information, e-mail quitmangardenclub@gmail.com.

Humble: The Mercer Arboretum & Botanic Garden, 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble, hosts a Lunch Bunch the second Wednesday of each month from noon until 2 p.m. Take a sack lunch or order a box lunch from Starbucks when you call 281-443-8731 to reserve your spot. Master Gardeners and Masters Naturalists may earn CEU credits by attending.

Jacksboro: The Jacksboro Garden Club meets at 9:30 a.m. the second Wednesday of each month (except June, July and August) at the Concerned Citizens Center, 400 East Pine Street, Jacksboro. For more information, call Melinda at 940-567-6218.

Longview: The Gregg County Master Gardeners Association meets the second Wednesday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 405 E. Marshall Ave., Longview. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program preceding the business meeting. For further information call Cindy Gill at 903-236-8429 or visit www.gregg-tx.tamu.edu.

Rockport: The Rockport Herb & Rose Study Group, founded in March 2003, meets the second Wednesday of each month at 10 a.m. at 619 N. Live Oak Street, Room 14, Rockport, to discuss all aspects of using and growing herbs, including historical uses and tips for successful propagation and cultivation. Sometimes they take field trips and have cooking demonstrations in different locations. For more information, contact Linda 361-729-6037, Ruth 361-729-8923 or Cindy 979-562-2153 or visit www.rockportherbs.org and http://rockportherbies.blogspot.com.

Woodway: The McLennan County Master Gardeners meet on the second Wednesday each month at noon at the Carleen Bright Arboretum, 9001 Bosque Blvd., Woodway. Educational programs follow the business session. For more information, call 254-757-5180.

Beaumont: The Jefferson County Master Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the AgriLife Extension Office, 1225 Pearl Street, Suite 200, Beaumont. For more information, call 409-835-8461.

Georgetown: The Williamson County Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the Georgetown Public Library, 402 W. 8th Street. Georgetown. For additional information, contract Billye Adams at 512-863-9636 or visit http://www.npsot.org/WilliamsonCounty/default.htm.

Orange: The Orange County Master Gardeners Association holds their monthly meeting on the second Thursday of each month. A short program is presented. The meeting starts at 6:30 p.m. at the Salvation Army Bldg. cor. MLK & Strickland in Orange. Pot luck supper at 6 p.m. Visit http://txmg.org/orange for more information.

San Antonio: The San Antonio Herb Society meets at 7 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month at the San Antonio Garden Center, 3310 N. New Braunfels (corner of Funston & N. New Braunfels). For more information on programs, visit www.sanantonioherbs.org.

Angleton: The Brazoria County Master Gardeners meet at 11 a.m. on the second Friday of each month at the Brazoria County Extension Office, 21017 County Road 171, Angleton. There is a general business meeting followed by a brief educational program each month. For further information call 979-864-1558, ext.110.

College Station: The A&M Garden Club meets on the second Friday of each month during the school year at 9:30 a.m. in the training room of the College Station Waste Water Facility building at the end of North Forest Parkway, College Station. Expert speakers, plant sharing, and federated club projects help members learn about gardening in the Brazos Valley, floral design, conservation, and more. For more information, visit http://www.amgardenclub.com/.

Houston: The Spring Branch African Violet Club meets the second Saturday of each month, January through November, at 10:30am at the Copperfield Baptist Church, 8350 Highway 6 North, Houston. Call Karla at 281-748-8417 prior to attending to confirm meeting date and time.

Dallas: The Rainbow Garden Club of North Texas meets the second Sunday of each month at 2 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Meetings are held at member’s homes and garden centers around the area. For more information, visit www.RainbowGardenClub.com.

THIRD WEEK

Arlington: The Arlington Men's Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the third Monday of each month (except December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact Lance Jepson at LJepson@aol.com.

Cleburne: The Johnson County Master Gardeners meet at 2 p.m. on the third Monday of each month at McGregor House, 1628 W. Henderson, Cleburne, which includes a program and a meet & greet. For more information, call Sharon Smith at 817-894-7700.

Corpus Christi: The Nueces Master Gardeners meet at noon the third Tuesday of each month, except December, at Garden Senior Center, 5325 Greely Dr., Corpus Christi. An educational program precedes the business meeting. For further information call 361 767-5217.

Rockport: Monthly meetings of the Aransas/San Patricio Master Gardeners are held at 10 a.m. on the third Tuesday of each month at Texas AgriLife Extension Service - Aransas County Office, 892 Airport Rd., Rockport. For additional information, e-mail aransas-tx@tamu.edu or call 361-790-0103.

Sugar Land: The Sugar Land Garden Club meets on the third Tuesday of each month, September through November and January through April at 10 a.m. at the Sugar Land Community Center, 226 Matlage Way, Sugar Land. The club hosts a different speaker each month. For more information, visit www.sugarlandgardenclub.org.

Denton: The Denton Organic Society, a group devoted to sharing information and educating the public regarding organic principles, meets the third Wednesday of each month (except July, August and December) at the Denton Senior Center, 509 N. Bell Avenue. Meetings are free and open to the public. Meetings begin at 7 p.m. and are preceded by a social at 6:30. For more information, call 940-382-8551.

Glen Rose: The Somervell County Master Gardeners meet at 10 a.m., the third Wednesday of each month at the Somervell County AgriLife Extension office, 1405 Texas Drive, Glen Rose. Visitors are welcome. For more information, call 254-897-2809 or visit www.somervellmastergardeners.org.

Granbury: The Lake Granbury Master Gardeners meet at 1 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at the Hood County Annex 1, 1410 West Pearl Street, Granbury. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program each month preceding the business meeting. For information on topics call 817-579-3280 or visit http://www.hoodcountymastergardeners.org/.

Seabrook: The Harris County Precinct 2 Master Gardeners hold an educational program at 10 a.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at The Meeting Room at Clear Lake Park (on the Lakeside), 5001 NASA Road 1, Seabrook. The programs are free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu.

Brownwood: Brownwood Garden Club meets the third Thursday of each month, 11:30 a.m.– 1 p.m.  The club meetings are at Southside Baptist Church, 1219 Indian Creek Road, with refreshments and a speaker presentation. Visitors are welcome. For more information, email boeblingen@centex.net or call 817-454-8175).

Houston: The Native Plant Society of Texas — Houston (NPSOT-H) meets at 7:30 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except for October (4th Thursday) and December (2nd Thursday). Location varies. For locations, for more information on programs, and for information about native plants for Houston, visit http://www.npsot.org/Houston.

Rosenberg: The Fort Bend Master Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except December at the Bud O’Shieles Community Center located at 1330 Band Road, Rosenberg. For more information, call 281-341-7068 or visit www.fbmg.com.

Seguin: The Guadalupe County Master Gardeners meets at 7 p.m. the third Thursday of each month, except June and December, at the Texas AgriLife Extension Bldg. at 210 E. Live Oak, Seguin. An educational program precedes the business meeting. The public is invited to attend. For topic or other information, call 830-379-1972 or visit www.guadalupecountymastergardeners.org.

FOURTH WEEK

Brackenridge Park: The Native Plant Society San Antonio Chapter meets every fourth Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. in the Lions Field Adult and Senior Center, 2809 Broadway at E. Mulberry, Brackenridge Park, except August and December. Social and seed/plant exchange at 6:30 p.m. Free and open to the public. For more information, contact Bea at 210-999-7292 or visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio.

Bryan: The Brazos County Master Gardeners, a program of Texas AgriLife Extension, meet the fourth Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. at the Brazos Center, 3232 Briarcrest Drive, Bryan. There is a public gardening program at each meeting and pertinent information may be found at brazosmg.com or 979-823-0129.

Edna: The Jackson County Master Gardeners present their "Come Grown With Us" seminars on the fourth Tuesday of each month, January through October, beginning at 7 p.m. at 411 N. Wells, Edna. The seminars are free, open to the public and offer 2 CEU hours to Master Gardeners or others requiring them. For additional information, contact the Jackson County Extension Office at 361-782-3312.

Linden: The Caddo Wildflower Chapter of Native Plants Society meets the fourth Tuesday of each month at the senior citizens building at 507 S Kaufman St. in Linden at 6:30. Visitors are welcome. For additional information, contact Karen Tromza at khtromza@yahoo.com.

Fort Worth: The Organic Garden Club of Forth Worth meets at 7 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday of each month except July and December at the Deborah Beggs Moncrief Garden Center, 3220 Botanic Blvd., Ft. Worth. Refreshments are served. For more information, call 817-263-9322 or visit www.ogcfw.webs.com.

San Antonio: The Native Plant Society of Texas San Antonio Chapter meets the fourth Tuesday of each month, except August and December, at the Lions Field Adult & Senior Center, 2809 Broadway, San Antonio. Social and plant/seed exchange at 6:30 p.m., program at 7:00 p.m. For more information, visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio or call Bea at 210-999-7292.

Houston: The Houston Chapter of the Native Prairie Association of Texas (HNPAT) meets from 7 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. the fourth Wednesday of each month at Bayland Park Community Center, 6400 Bissonnet, Houston. For more information, contact hnpat@prairies.org.

Leander: The Leander Garden Club meets on the fourth Thursday of each month (except July and August) at 10:30 a.m. at the community room behind the Greater Texas Federal Credit Union,1300 N. Bell, Cedar Park, unless there is special event planned. Following a program and short business meeting, we share a pot-luck luncheon. To confirm the meeting place and time, please call president Cathy Clark-Ramsey at 512-963-4698 or email info@leandergc.org.

Dallas: The Dallas County Master Gardeners meet the fourth Thursday of each month at 11:30 a.m. For location and program information, visit http://www.dallascountymastergardeners.org/ or contact The Helpdesk, M-F, 8 to 4:30 214-904-3053.

Dallas: The Greater Dallas Organic Garden Club meets at 7:00 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of each month at the REI, 4515 LBJ Freeway, Dallas. For more information, call 214-824-2448 or visit www.gdogc.org.

Arlington: The Arlington Organic Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the last Thursday of each month (except November and December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact David at 817-483-7746.


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Texas Gardener’s Seeds is published weekly. © Suntex Communications, Inc. 2013. All rights reserved. You may forward this publication to your friends and colleagues if it is sent in its entirety. No individual part of this newsletter may be reproduced in any manner without prior written permission from the publisher.

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Publisher: Chris S. Corby ● Editor: Michael Bracken

Texas Gardener’s Seeds, P.O. Box 9005, Waco, Texas 76714 ● www.TexasGardener.com