September 4, 2013

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Mari-mums can add as big of a splash of color as chrysanthemums, but if planted in the late summer or early fall, mari-mum flowers will last through Halloween and even Thanksgiving, according to Texas A&M AgriLife Extension service horticulturists. (Texas A&M AgriLife Research photo by Dr. Mike Arnold)


Bright orange marigolds or mari-mums, such as these Tagetes erecta, or Aztec marigolds, are traditionally used as decorations for the Mexican Day of the Dead holiday, according to Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service horticulturists. (Texas A&M AgriLife Research photo by Dr. Mike Arnold)

Mari-mums: chrysanthemum color lasting two or three times longer

By Robert Burns
Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service

Got the fading late summer/fall garden blues as everything seems to be turning gray and brown?

Mari-mums, the latest Texas Superstar promotion, might give your garden that shot of bright, showy color it needs, said a Texas A&M AgriLife Research horticulturist.

“The main selling point of mari-mums is that they have good color throughout the fall,” said Dr. Brent Pemberton, AgriLife Research horticulturist and chair of the Texas Superstar executive board. “As compared to chrysanthemums — which may flower for several weeks if the weather is cool — mari-mums will flower for the entire fall season, until it frosts.”

Texas Superstar plants undergo extensive tests throughout the state by Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service horticulturists, Pemberton said.

Texas Superstar is a registered trademark owned by Texas A&M AgriLife Research, a state agency that is part of the Texas A&M University System. More information about the Texas Superstar program can be found at http://texassuperstar.com/.

To be designated a Texas Superstar, a plant must not just be beautiful but also perform well for consumers and growers throughout Texas. Superstars must also be easy to propagate, which should ensure the plants are not only widely available throughout Texas but also reasonably priced, he said.

Mari-mums fit the Texas Superstar bill perfectly, particularly when planted in the late summer or early fall, Pemberton said.

“The flowers last two to three times longer than chrysanthemums, are inexpensive and don’t require the constant pinching and pruning,” he said. “In case you are worried about the spider mites normally associated with marigolds, you can put your worries to rest. By planting mari-mums in late August to early September, cooler autumn temperatures greatly reduce spider mite pressure.”

Mari-mums are such a good fit for the Texas Superstar program, the 2013 promotion is actually the second time around for the plant. The first Texas Superstar promotion was Texas Bluebonnets in the fall of 1989, followed in the fall of 1990 with mari-mums, according to Pemberton.

“We were interested in a re-promotion to make people aware of them again,” Pemberton said. “Also, there are some new varieties to add to the list that we have promoted in the past.”

Taishan is an example of a new variety, he said. It is a recently introduced series that is a little more compact than those the Texas Superstar board have recommended in the past, such as the Discovery and Antiqua series — both of which are bigger, bolder types of plants.

All the mari-mum series have typical marigold colors, yellow, gold and orange flowers, Pemberton said. Mari-mums may be planted in either containers or landscape beds.

“They do need a sunny spot with well-drained soil,” Pemberton said. “Incorporate organic material and fertilizer as needed. Water the plants in thoroughly and enjoy the dazzling colors.”

You won’t find “mari-mums” in Webster’s dictionary, said David Rodriguez, AgriLife Extension horticulture agent in Bexar County and member of the Texas Superstar board. This is because they are a relatively new kind of marigold.

“Most people recognize the traditional chrysanthemums or fall garden mum,” Rodriguez said. “But mari-mums are really marigolds. It’s a large, blooming Africanized marigold with chrysanthemum-like flowers. Thus, we came up with the name, ‘mari-mum.’”

Mari-mums go by many different names, he said, including “fall marigolds,” “African marigolds,” “large blooming marigolds” and others.

Rodriguez noted that he did his first internship with Dr. Jerry Parsons, retired AgriLife Extension horticulturist, San Antonio, on the original research that led to the first promotion of mari-mums in 1990.

There’s one gardening recommendation that came out of the late 1980s research that has been consistently hard to convince people to follow, Rodriguez said. If gardeners buy transplants that have big blooms, the first thing they should do after replanting is to pinch off the big blooms.

“If you can, buy healthy, nice looking transplants that are budded but have no flowers on them,” he said. “If you purchase transplants with big flowers on them, then at least you’re sure you know what color you’re getting, but if you leave that big flower on them, you’ll stunt them.

He said the pruned plants will produce new flowers in two or three weeks at the most. And in most of Texas, if planted in August to mid-September, the flowers will last well into Halloween and Thanksgiving.

Speaking of Halloween, orange marigolds or mari-mums are traditionally used as decorations for the Mexican version of the holiday, the Day of the Dead, or Día de los Muertos, Rodriguez said.

The holiday, which is celebrated Nov. 1–2, is a joyous event to remember and pay respect to friends and family members who have passed, he said. Marigolds, known as “maravillas” in Spanish, with their bright, cheery colors, are traditionally used as cut-flower decorations during the celebrations, particularly the orange shades as they are associated with fall harvest.>

Texas Superstar is a registered trademark owned by Texas A&M AgriLife Research. More information about the Texas Superstar program can be found at http://www.texassuperstar.com/.

Along with Pemberton, other Texas Superstar board members include Dr. Cynthia McKenney, Lubbock, Dr. Mike Arnold, College Station, Dr. Larry Stein, Uvalde, Dr. Dan Lineberger, College Station, and Dr. Tim Davis, College Station.


The garden reader:
Organic gardening alternatives

By William Scheick
Book Reviewer

Loren Nancarrow and Janet Hogan Taylor. Dead Snails Leave No Trails: Natural Pest Control for Home and Garden. Ten Speed Press Press, 2013. 186 pp. $12.99.

Bill Best. Saving Seeds, Preserving Taste. Ohio University Press, 2013. 200 pp. $22.95.

It is hard to escape so much bad news about the impact of chemical insecticides on our natural environment, including the sources of our tap water. There is plenty of good news, however, in Dead Snails Leave No Trails, a highly readable and practical guide to natural pest control.

“Chemical insect sprays,” Loren Nancarrow and Janet Hogan Taylor explain, don’t differentiate “between an insect that will eat your prized veggies and the ones that make their living by eating the same insect pests you want gone.” Instead, a more precise approach would “consider how nature seeks balance” and then try to mimic that pattern in our own gardening behavior.

Their chapter on home-pest control profiles ants (try sugared baking soda, chili pepper or cornmeal, for example), bedbugs, stinkbugs, cockroaches, dust mites, rodents and termites. Their garden-pest control advice ranges from aphids and cabbage loopers to mealy bugs, mosquitoes and whitefly, among many other nuisances.

The authors also provide a nifty pet-help chapter on managing fleas, flies and ticks. Also, sections on beneficial insects and plants are equally informative.

Since my Fredericksburg neighbors’ unmanaged gophers appear to be steadily approaching my home there, I was keenly interested in the authors’ discussion of responses to four-legged intruders. I had been counting on my digging huskies to make a difference, at least in the fenced-in part of that property, but now I feel much better prepared for the day the first gopher pops up in my yard.

Worth every penny of its price, Dead Snails Leave No Trails is an extraordinarily beneficial book that can save plenty of your money and also actually make a big difference in your gardening experience.

The enhanced gardening experiences of heirloom seed savers and propagators are highlighted in Dr. Bill Best’s Saving Seeds, Preserving Taste. Included are anecdotes about the author’s family and humorous episodes involving other conservationists of heirloom beans, tomatoes, corn, squash and cucumbers.

A fascinating cast of characters includes Best’s mother: “Having said frequently that she would wear out rather than rust out, Mother had kept gardening as long as possible, always saving seeds for the next season and making sure she had plenty to share.”

It took a while for Best to realize his own calling in the movement for sustainable agriculture. “I had been slow to realize that I was involved in an activity that dealt with a lot of history and culture and also tapped into widespread unhappiness with the state of the modern food supply — a food supply increasingly dominated by large corporate firms and multinational food/feed/seed/chemical conglomerates.”

Avid readers of “In Greg’s Garden” will delight in Best’s highly personal and engaging book, which should handily tide them over between issues of Texas Gardener.



Ruby Mize Azalea Garden. (Photo courtesy SFA Gardens)
Nacogdoches named the Garden Capital of Texas

By Greg Grant
SFA Gardens-Pineywoods Native Plant Center

Nacogdoches , the oldest town in Texas, is now the Garden Capital of Texas, after a bill authored by District 11 State Representative Travis Clardy was signed by Texas Governor Rick Perry on May 2, 2013.

At a ribbon cutting and dedication held at the Stephen F. Austin State University Pineywoods Native Plant Center, author, historian, and father of the LaNana Creek trail, Professor Ab Abernathy made the following speech.

Nacogdoches is a garden city. It was named after its first gardeners, the Nacogdoches tribe of the Caddo Indians. Thirteen hundred years ago the Nacogdoches Indians lived on the high ground between the two full- flowing, spring-fed creeks. Their name, Nacogdoches, meant “from the place of the high ground” (some sources say “persimmon eaters”). The Spanish came to the place on the high ground between the two creeks in 1716. They named the creek on the east La Nana, meaning “the Nurse,” and the one on the west La Banita, “The Little Bath.” The first gardeners — the first agrarian culture in Texas — were these Caddos, who brought gardening with them from their eastern homes. They raised corn, squash, and pumpkins. They cultivated a variety of beans, sunflowers, and tobacco; and they created the strongest and most advanced Indian culture in Texas.

The Nacogdoches Caddos gardened on the high ground between the two creeks for well over a thousand years. The Spanish learned the Caddo’s gardening ways, and added a dimension of herbs and spices to the garden plots.

Anglo settlers began coming to and through the Gateway to Texas in the early 1800s. In 1832 at the Battle of Nacogdoches they ended Spanish military control in all of East Texas. In 1836, after the Battle of San Jacinto, Nacogdoches became a settlement in the Republic of Texas, and after 1846 Nacogdoches became a city in the Lone Star State in the United States.

In the 1830s, during the troublesome, birthing times of Texas, Nacogdoches gardened. C.A. Sterne describes Adolphus Sterne’s home:

“My father took great pride and interest in his gardens and orchard. There were three gardens on the place. The one on the north was devoted to flowers, with a great variety of roses and rare shrubs and plants, which he had brought from Louisiana, and which had been imported from France.

“In the center of the garden was a summer house, which was covered with morning glories and multiflora roses. The fence was covered with woodbine and yellow jasmine. The south garden had vegetables of every variety. The west garden was the orchard with a variety of fruit trees and a butter bean arbor running the entire width of the garden. My father often resorted to the butter bean arbor to read and study.”

When Frederick Law Olmsted (designer of Central Park, the Biltmore estate landscape, etc.) came to Nacogdoches in 1853, he said of the town: “The houses along the road…stand in gardens, and are neatly painted — the first exterior sign of cultivation of mind since the Red River.”

Nacogdoches became a modern town in the 20th century with parks and landscaping. It became a city of prosperous houses and ornamental gardens along the Camino Real. Its grandest show of flowers and foliage, however, developed around the campus of Stephen F. Austin State University (founded in 1923 as Stephen F. Austin State Teacher’s College). The SFA campus was from its beginning a flourishing garden of blooming plants and flowering trees and shrubs. SFA now is the center of the most prosperous and prominent set of flowering gardens in the State of Texas. SFA hosts the largest azalea garden in the state and Nacogdoches was named the first Azalea City in America.

The university is home to the Pineywoods Native Plant Center, the Mast Arboretum, the Gayla Mize Garden, the Kingham Children’s Garden, and the SFA Recreational Trails and Gardens. Collectively these gardens contain the state’s largest botanical collections of azaleas, baldcypress, boxwood, camellias, gardenias, hollies, hydrangeas, magnolias, and maples. For more information on these gardens visit sfagardens.sfasu.edu.

In addition to a number of public parks and walking trails, Nacogdoches is also home to the Durst-Taylor Historic House and Gardens, the Adolphus Sterne Museum and Gardens, and the Master Gardener Demonstration Garden.

In concluding his speech, Dr. Abernathy said:

The development of the beauty of gardens, parks, and trails is not for the purpose of luring tourists or improving business, although both areas will profit from such ventures. Natural beauty is encouraged for its own sake and for the fact that life among gardens, trees, flowers, and flowing water is richer and kinder than life among strip malls and parking lots. The Garden Capital of our beautiful and beloved Nacogdoches deserves no less than to be a setting for such a life.


Gardening tips

"We had our central A/C unit’s drip line run to the outside of the house and then put a rain barrel under it," writes Mark Schatzman. "Amazing amount of water collection that used to end up in the plumbing line. Now using the runoff to water our garden."

Have a favorite gardening tip you’d like to share? Texas Gardener’s Seeds is seeking brief gardening tips from Texas gardeners to use in future issues. If we publish your tip in Seeds, we will send you a free Texas Gardener 2013 Planning Guide & Calendar. Please send your tips of 50 words or less to the editor at: Gardening Tips.



Frog fruit.

Did you know...

Many consider frog fruit Phyla nodiflora a weed but did you know that it is one of the toughest native ground covers available? It is very low growing and sports tiny white flowers from spring to fall. Does not require mowing, fertilzer or supplemental irrigation and will grow in sun or shade. It may not be available in the nursery trade but can easily be stared from a small clump collected in the wild.


Upcoming garden events

If you would like your organization’s events included in "Upcoming Garden Events" or would like to make a change to a listed event, please contact us at Garden Events. To ensure inclusion in this column, please provide complete details at least three weeks prior to the event.

SEPTEMBER

Kerrville: Seeds contributor Tom Harris, Ph.D., will lead "Gardening 101" from 1:30-3:30 p.m. and again from 6:30-8:30 p.m., September 4, at the Dietert Center in Kerrville. For additional information, visit www.clubed.net.

New Braunfels: Dr. Jerry Parsons will present “Six Months of Color in a Drought” at 6 p.m., September 4, at the GVTC Auditorium, 36101 FM 3159, New Braunfels. Parsons one of the most popular public gardening speakers in the Lone Star State, sometimes deriding but always delighting gardeners with his enthusiastic combination of irreverent and educational humor. Parsons is the former horticulture specialist with the Texas Cooperative Extension in San Antonio, and a popular Extension Service personality for more than two decades. Parsons has been responsible for educating and entertaining the Alamo City and surrounding area with weekly horticultural information on TV and radio and in newspaper for 34 years. Although his specialty is vegetable production, Parsons has revolutionized the plant introduction arena and is the father of CEMAP (the Coordinated Educational Marketing Assistance Program) at Texas A&M University. The plant introduction and promotion program is now copied by similar programs throughout the United States. Parsons’ presentation is open to the public.

Angleton: September 5 is the registration deadline for the 2013 Fall Brazoria County master Gardener Training. The program will be held at the Brazoria County Extension Office, 21017 CR 171, Angleton, beginning September 12 and continuing through November 14 on Thursdays from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. The master gardener training program is 60 hours of classroom training that covers a wide range of gardening topics. Course cost is $99. For more information, contact BCMGA at 979-864-1558 x110 or email http://txmg.org/brazoria.

College Station: Brazos County Master Gardeners in collaboration with the Brazos Valley Groundwater Conservation District and City of College Station will present “Harvest Blue-Grow Green” September 5-8 at Brazos County Expo Center. Water conservation exhibit featuring information and displays illustrating rainwater harvesting, drip irrigation, container gardening, and rain gardens. Meet and talk with experts to learn about water saving landscape, irrigation techniques, city and county rebates. Learn about and join the Save 40 initiative and commit to save 40 gallons of water. Join Doug Welsh and local Master Gardeners to kick off the event Thursday evening September 5, 5-7 p.m. For additional information, visit brazosmg.com, call 979-823-0129, or email brazosmg@brazosmg.com.

Midland/Odessa: Permian Basin Master Gardeners will present the second part of a 2-part compost class at 6:30 p.m., September 5, at Odessa Time Machine, 814 W. 42nd, Odessa. Free. For more information, call 432-498-4071.

San Antonio: The Texas Water Star Program's Grounds Maintenance Workshop will be held at the San Antonio Livestock Exposition Dairy Parlor, 3201 E. Houston, San Antonio, on Friday, September 6, from 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Workshop for professional groundskeepers, landscape managers and interested members of the public and will focus on irrigation systems & evaluation, plant selection and improved plant water use, fertilizers & pesticides, and more. Cost $40 in advance or $50 at the door. For more information contact Angel Torres at (210) 467-6575.

Dallas: Join entomologist John Watts at Texas Discovery Gardens, 3601 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Dallas, for a family friendly guided tour of the Rosine Smith Sammons Butterfly House and Insectarium Saturday, September 7, at 11 a.m. Enjoy a behind the scenes look at these winged wonders. The tour is followed by our daily noon butterfly release! Admission is $8/person, $6 for ages 60+ and $4 for ages 3-11. For more information, visit http://texasdiscoverygardens.org.

Houston: Rainwater Harvesting and Cisterns. A discussion of very low-cost methods of absorbing water on your property, as well as more expensive methods such as rainwater cisterns. Saturday, September 7. 9 - 11:15 a.m. $24 Urban Harvest members. $36 non-members. Westbury Community Garden, 12601 Fonmeadow. For more information, call 713-880-5540 or visit www.urbanharvest.org.

La Marque: “Gardening Under Glass,” Saturday, September 7, 9–11:30 a.m. Greenhouse Specialist and Galveston County Master Gardener Bob McPherson will give a presentation on how to properly set-up and manage hobby greenhouses. Topics covered in the program include the various types of structures and the materials for building, as well as cooling, heating, water management, water injection of fertilizers, and sanitation. Galveston County AgriLife Extension Office in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (FM 519), La Marque. For course reservations, call 281-534-3413, ext. 12 or email GALV3@wt.net.

San Antonio: David Rodriguez, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service Horticulturist, will lead the Earth-Kind Educational Seminar: Growing a Fall and Winter Vegetable Garden at Fanick’s Garden Center,1025 Holmgreen Rd., San Antonio, Saturday, September 7, 10:30 a.m. to noon. Take gardening curiosities and questions. For more information, contact Angel Torres at 210-467-6575.

Dallas: Renowned author Geyata Ajilsvgi presents her brand new book, Butterfly Gardening for Texas, at Texas Discovery Gardens, 3601 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Dallas, September 8, 2013 at 2 p.m. Enjoy a stroll through our butterfly house and gardens, followed by a Q&A and book signing. Books available for sale at the Gift Shop. Free. RSVP to SGardner@TexasDiscoveryGardens.org. For more information, visit http://texasdiscoverygardens.org.

Houston: Houston Urban Gardeners (HUG) will meet Monday, September 9, 6:30 p.m., at a new location, 1475 W. Gray, Houston. Four presenters: ebuckets and eplanters, African keyhole gardens, hugelkultur and zai and olla combo, and spin farming. For more information, visit www.houstonurbangardeners.org. Free.

Seabrook: Chris Hammen, a Harris County Master Gardener, will discuss Fall Vegetable Gardening at 6:30 p.m., Tuesday, September 10, at the Clear Lake Meeting room, 5001 NASA Parkway, Seabrook. For more information, visit http://hcmga.tamu.edu.

Humble: “Texas Carnivorous and Bog Plants” will be presented Wednesday, September 11, noon - 2 p.m. at Mercer Arboretum & Botanic, located one mile north of FM 1960 at 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble. Learn how carnivorous plants attract, capture, and digest prey from Mike Howlett, owner of PetFlyTrap.com. For more information, call 281-443-8731 or visit www.hcp4.net/mercer.

San Angelo: The Concho Valley Master Gardeners will present their Fall Landscape Symposium, Saturday, September 12, at the Stephens Central Library Community Room, 3rd floor, 33 W. Beauregard, San Angelo. Registration begins at 8 a.m. Programs begin at 8:30 a.m. and continue through 4:15 p.m. Guest speakers include Allison Watkins, AgriLife Extension Horticulturalist for Tom Green County; John Begnaud, AgriLife Extension Agent, retired; Dr. William Welch, professor and landscape horticulturalist for Texas A&M; and Alan King, landscape architect. The cost: $20 per person; $30 per person includes lunch and refreshments. Call 325-659-6522 to register. RSVP by Wednesday, September 18, to ensure seating and handout materials. No childcare will be provided.

The Woodlands: Researchers and co-authors of A Dazzle of Dragonflies, Dr. Forrest Mitchell and James Lasswell, will take the audience from garden pond into the secret world of one of our most beneficial insects on Thursday, September 12 at 7:30 p.m. at McCullough Junior High School, 3800 S. Panther Creek Dr., The Woodlands. Discover the beauty and fascinating behaviors of the insect predator and learn about water gardening. Plus, book signing of A Dazzle of Dragonflies, a widely acclaimed volume released by Texas A & M Press. Free program. Call 210-210-3800 or more information or visit Walk in the Woods Nature Lecture.

Austin: The Green Corn Project Fall Dig-ins will take place over three weekends in September. This is our primary mission of installing and refurbishing vegetable gardens for the under-served communities in Austin. Participating in a dig-in is a great way to share your gardening knowledge or learn to garden yourself while helping to bring nourishing food to others. The 3 weekends are September 14/15, 21/22, and 28/29. For more information and to register, visit http://www.greencornproject.org/.

Conroe: Montgomery County Master Gardeners are presenting an Aquaponics System Design & Operation Workshop 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Saturday, September 14, at the Thomas LeRoy Education Center, 9020 Airport Road, Conroe. Aquaponics is the growing of plants in a symbiotic relationship with fish. Learn everything needed to set up and maintain a system; and by attending have the opportunity to win a system. Registration is $60 per person, due by September 6. Lunch provided. For the registration form or for more information, visit www.mcmga.com or call 936-539-7824.

Dallas: The Texas Discovery Gardens Fall Plant Sale will take place at 3601 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Dallas, Saturday, September 14, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Rare native pollinator-friendly plants are our specialty. Enjoy native and adapted plants that are hard to find in local nurseries! Members get to shop Friday, September 13, and they also receive 10% off plants. Discover how to incorporate native plants into your landscape one hour before each sale. The Plant Sale Safaris are $15, $10 for members. Admission to the Friday safari allows you to shop at the member sale. For more information, visit http://texasdiscoverygardens.org.

Dallas: Take a family-friendly guided tour of Texas Discovery Gardens, 3601 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Dallas, with our monthly Garden Explorers Walk, September 14. Take a garden tour with our garden docent and search for squirrels’ nests, hungry caterpillars, frogs and butterflies in the great outdoors. It ends in time for you to catch the Butterfly Release talk at noon in our conservatory. Admission is $8/person, $6 for ages 60+ and $4 for ages 3-11. For more information, visit http://texasdiscoverygardens.org.

Ft. Worth: Learn about “Ornamental Grasses” at a lecture and tour, Saturday, September 14, 10 a.m. – noon in the Magnolia Room of the 2300 Building, 2300 Circle Drive, at the Fort Worth Resource Connection. The Resource Connection is located off Campus Dr, north from I-20. Look for the Resource Connection signs on Campus Drive . Cost is $5 and class limit is 40. Pre-registration is required. To register and for more information/directions, contact Billie Hammack at blhammack@ag.tamu.edu or call 817-884-1296.

Ft. Worth: Children, parents and grandparents are invited to learn about “Backyard Chickens” from Master Gardeners at the Fort Worth Botanic Garden Backyard Vegetable Garden pavilion, Saturday, September 14, 10 a.m. This is a free class. Class limit: 20. Children must be five years or older and must be accompanied by a parent or grandparent. Pre-registration is required. To register and for more information/directions, contact Billie Hammack at blhammack@ag.tamu.edu or call 817-884-1296.

La Marque: “Growing Onions and Garlic,” Saturday September 14, 9-11 a.m. Because fall is the ideal time to plant onions and garlic in our area, Galveston County Master Gardener Ken Steblein will be presenting a program on what you need to know to grow your own onions and garlic. Galveston County AgriLife Extension Office in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (FM 519), La Marque. For course reservations, call 281-534-3413, ext. 12 or email GALV3@wt.net.

La Marque: “Kitchen Gardening,” Saturday, September 14, 1-3:30 p.m. Presented by Galveston County Master Gardener Mary Demeny, Mary will cover various techniques of vegetable gardening in your own backyard. She will include gardening near the back door, where Mary recycles, mulches and compost her garden. Mary will also cover how she makes use of an interplant technique of growing vegetables among the flower beds and in pots she has. Galveston County AgriLife Extension Office in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (FM 519), La Marque. For course reservations, call 281-534-3413, ext. 12 or email GALV3@wt.net.

Nacogdoches/Arcadia: Naked Ladies and Oxbloods: SFA Gardens Arcadian Fall Bulb Bus Tour, September 14. Visit Texas Gardener columnist Greg Grant’s Emanis House dogtrot in Shelby County’s rural community of Arcadia. Depending on the weather, see red oxblood lilies (Rhodophiala), several different colors of spider lilies (Lycoris), or assorted rain lilies (Cooperia, Zephyranthes, and Habranthus). Unfortunately their display depends on the first fall rains so a grand naturalized bulb display isn’t guaranteed. Visit Grant’s old family home with an open breezeway running through it, along with his small cottage garden, chickens, and bluebird houses. Dress comfortably for potentially hot weather. The bus tour will be from 9 a.m. until noon. All participants will meet at the SFA Ag building, Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacognoches, at 9 a.m. $25 for Friends of SFA Gardens members, $30 for non-members. For more information and reservations contact Elyce Rodwald at 936-468-1832 or erodewald@sfasu.edu. Other SFA Gardens events and information can be found at sfagardens.sfasu.edu.

San Antonio: The Backyard Basics Expo will be held at Madison High School AgriLife Program Campus, 5005 Stahl Road, San Antonio, on Saturday, September 14, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. This Event will feature a variety of activities and hands-on demonstrations related to home-grown foods. Education sessions include: making soft cheeses, raising backyard poultry, rainwater conservation, food preservation, garden basics, backyard rabbits, beekeeping and more! $25 per person until September 6, $35 per person thereafter. Children under 16 are free. Lunch on your own; food available onsite. For more details, visit http://bexar-tx.tamu.edu/backyardbasics/.

Victoria: Victoria County Master Gardener Association will celebrate its 10th anniversary for Victoria Educational Gardens September 14 in Victoria. There will be a "Festival in the Gardens" symposium with food and nursery vendors, children's activities and speakers from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. There also will be a plant sale free to the public from 8 a.m. until whenever all plants are sold. The event will be at the VEG facilities across from Victoria Regional Airport control tower on Bachelor Drive.

Houston: Organic Container Gardening. Don't have enough space to grow your favorite herbs and vegetables? Container Gardening may be your answer. Sunday, September 15. 2:30 - 4:30 p.m. $36 non-members. Wabash Feed, 5701 Washington Ave, Houston. For more information, call 713-880-5540 or visit www.urbanharvest.org.

Houston: The Harris County Master Gardeners at Precinct 2 will host Open Garden Day at Genoa Friendship Garden, 1202 Genoa Red Bluff, Houston, on Monday, September 16, 8:30 a.m. - 11 a.m. Master Gardeners will be on hand to answer gardening questions and will present an educational program about container gardening 9:30 a.m. - 10:30 am. For more information, visit http://hcmga.tamu.edu.

Lufkin: “Heirloom Plants and Gardens for Texas” will be presented Monday, September 16, 6:30 pm., by Dr. Bill Welch, retired Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service Horticulturist and author of “Heirloom Plants and Gardens for the South,” “Antique Roses for the South,” and “Perennial Garden Color.” Books will be available for sale and signing. Hosted by Angelina County Master Gardeners at Angelina County Extension Office, 2201 S. Medford Drive, Lufkin. Registration is $10 at the door. Door prizes and refreshments. Call 936-634-6414 for more information.

Midland/Odessa: At 6:30 p.m. on September 16, 17, 25, and 26, Permian Basin Master Gardeners will present a 4-part EarthKind Home Landscape School at Commemorative Air Force, 9600 Wright Dr., Midland-Odessa Airport. $150. For additional information, call 432-498-4071.

Houston: Planting the Fall Vegetable Garden (hands-on). What better way to gain expert knowledge than to see how it is done firsthand through our fall gardening course. Tuesday, September 17, 6-8:30 pm. $24 Urban Harvest members. $36 non-members. Westbury Community Garden, 12601 Fonmeadow, 77035. For more information, call 713-880-5540 or visit www.urbanharvest.org.

San Antonio: Learn more about Planning and Preparation for a successful fall vegetable garden. The Backyard Gardening Series is open to the public and presented by David Rodriguez, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service Horticulturist, on Tuesday, September 17, 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. at the Extension Office, 3355 Cherry Ridge, Suite 208, San Antonio. Registration fee is $10. For more information or to RSVP, contact Angel Torres at (210) 467-6575.

Kerrville: Seeds contributor Tom Harris, Ph.D., will lead "You're in Texas Now, Gardening is Different Here" from 1:30-3:30 p.m. and again from 6:30-8:30 p.m., September 18, at the Dietert Center in Kerrville. For additional information, visit www.clubed.net.

Seabrook: Gudrun Opperman, a Harris County Master Gardener and a Clinical Biologist, will discuss Shade Gardening at 10 a.m., Wednesday, September 18, at The Meeting Room at Clear Lake Park (on the lakeside), 5001 NASA Parkway, Seabrook. has been a volunteer at Mercer Arboretum and Botanic Garden for 20 years. For more information, visit http://hcmga.tamu.edu.

Midland: Permian Basin Master Gardeners will present Irrigation Efficiency Made Easy at 6:30 p.m., September 19, at Midland Extension Office, 2445 E. Hwy 80. Midland. Free. For more information, call 432-498-4071.

San Antonio: Bexar County Master Gardeners will meet Thursday, September 19, 6:30 p.m. – 8 p.m. at the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service Conference Room, 3355 Cherry Ridge Dr., Suite 208, San Antonio. This meeting is open to the public and is free. Learn the benefits of drip irrigation and put your hands on some of the key components. Learn how you can save money, time, and water while you beat the heat!" For more information, contact Lisa Nixon at 210-364-7844 or email lisa.nixon@bexarcountymastergardeners.org.

San Antonio: Seeds contributor Tom Harris, Ph.D., will lead "Gardening 101" September 19, at the Community Learning Center, 8750 Tesoro Drive, San Antonio. For registration information, contact Carrie Smith at www.communityed.neisd.net.

Dallas: After many years of research and construction, the Dallas Arboretum, 8525 Garland Road, Dallas will open the Rory Meyer's Children's Adventure Garden on Saturday, September, 21. The 8-acre garden will feature over 150 interactive exhibits including areas to explain how energy comes from water, the sun and wind; a wetland where children will learn to do pond dippings and read animal tracks; a Texas Skywalk will feature a look at life in the tree tops and inside a tree itself; a Discovery Center that will include a 30ft globe that will show Pangaea, the solar system and major weather events. Autumn at the Arboretum will also open on Saturday, September 21.

Dallas: Landscape designer and author Bonnie Reese will lead two free seminars on Saturday, September 21: “Water-Wise Landscape Design 101” and “Fantastic Plants for North Texas.” Ms. Reese has more than 20 years experience designing, installing and maintaining landscapes in North Texas and is the owner of her own landscape design and consulting company, Beautiful Landscapes. Attendees at each session will receive a copy of Bonnie’s book, Common-Sense Landscaping (hard copy or electronic version - limit one per household). Attendees can enter a drawing to win a bag of Green Sense organic fertilizer from Rohde’s Nursery & Nature Store (BeOrganic.com). There will be 3 drawings per session. “Water-Wise Landscape Design 101”: 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Whether you have a new landscape or plan to update an existing area, it is critical to begin with a good design. This program teaches the principles of landscape design with an emphasis on how to create a beautiful landscape that will save resources, natural and financial! “Fantastic Plants for North Texas”: 1:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. Using colorful photographs, Bonnie demonstrates the natural beauty of native and adapted plants that thrive in the North Texas region. Learn when, where and how to plant each of the recommended plants, their size and height at maturity, seasonal color, texture and more. This program provides information on trees, shrubs, vines, perennials, groundcovers and turf grasses. Space is limited, so register online at SaveDallasWater.com or by calling (214) 670-3155. Both seminars will be presented at Performance Hall (Building E) at Mountain View College, 4849 W. Illinois Avenue, Dallas. Seminars sponsored by Dallas Water Utilities Conservation, City of Dallas Stormwater Management, and Mountain View College.

Ft. Worth: “Perennials” will be discussed on Saturday, September 21, 10 a.m. - noon at the Fort Worth Resource Connection, Building 2300, Magnolia Room, 2300 Circle Drive. The Resource Connection is located off Campus Dr, north from I-20. Look for the Resource Connection signs on Campus Drive . Class fee is $5 and the class is limited to 40. Pre-registration is required. To register and for more information/directions, contact Billie Hammack at blhammack@ag.tamu.edu or call 817-884-1296.

Houston: Constructing the Home Fruit & Vegetable Garden (hands-on). This class is outdoors and is for anyone who wants to build a vegetable or fruit garden at their home. Saturday, September 21. 9-11:30 a.m. $24 Urban Harvest members. $36 non-members. Westbury Community Garden, 12601 Fonmeadow. For more information, call 713-880-5540 or visit www.urbanharvest.org.

La Marque “Grafting Workshop Using the T-Budding Method,” Saturday, September 21, 9-11 a.m. Galveston County Master Gardener Herman Auer, Propagation Specialist, will present a program and hands-on workshop on T-Bud grafting. Attendees will leave the class ready to begin their own grafting projects with confidence. The grafting method presented is used on many types of fruit and citrus trees usually about the size of a pencil. Class is limited to 24 participants and you must pre-register in order to attend. Other persons may attend for observation only. Galveston County AgriLife Extension Office in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (FM 519), La Marque. For course reservations, call 281-534-3413, ext. 12 or email GALV3@wt.net.

La Marque: “The Fabulous Fragrant Frangipani (Plumeria),” Tuesday, September 24, 6:30-8 p.m. Presented by Galveston County Master Gardener Loretta Osteen, the program will include information on the history of the Plumeria and tips for growing and caring for them in Galveston County. Also included will be information about different flower shapes, fragrance and colors of the different varieties of Plumeria successfully grown in our area of South Texas. Incorporated in the presentation will be methods of propagation, proper winter storage and care. There will also be a demonstration on how to make the popular Plumeria Lei. Galveston County AgriLife Extension Office in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (FM 519), La Marque. For course reservations, call 281-534-3413, ext. 12 or email GALV3@wt.net.

Bryan: Naomi Sachs, ASLA, EDAC will present “Gardens for Health and Well-Being” at 7 p.m., September 24, at Brazos Center, 3232 Briarcrest Drive, Bryan. Event Details: "As gardeners, we know how important nature is. Sachs, a landscape architect and a PhD student at TAMU’s Center for Health Systems and Design, will share her knowledge about healing gardens and other landscapes for health. This program is free to the public. For additional information, call 979-823-0129 or visit brazosmg@brazosmg.com.

Houston: Organic Pest Control. Come observe how one dynamic garden actively uses common plants to attract beneficial insects that will help your garden prosper. Thursday, September 26, 6:30-9 p.m. $24 Urban Harvest members. $36 non-members. University of Houston Main Campus, 4361 Wheeler St. Bldg & Room TBA. For more information, call 713-880-554 or www.urbanharvest.org.

Fredericksburg: At the 13th annual Renewable Energy Roundup & Green Living Fair (The Roundup) David Foster, State Director of Clean Water Fund, will discuss water issues and offer some solutions. Fair goers will find several other speakers and a panel of representatives from universities, land management organizations and business leaders addressing the topic Saving Water Inside and Outside Your Home and in Your Community. Several businesses will be offering water conservation measures and rainwater harvesting alternatives in their exhibits. The Roundup takes place at Market Square, 126 West Main St., Fredericksburg, September 27-29. The 13th Renewable Energy Roundup & Green Living Fair offers a great reason to plan a fall road trip to the Texas Hill Country. Organizers of The Roundup are acutely aware of concerns about continuing drought, stress on finite resources, and challenges to the environment. In response The Roundup offers fairgoers the opportunity to see the latest eco-friendly home ideas in action. And they can taste, test, explore and secure a wide range of healthier and self-sufficient lifestyle products and services. For more information, visit http://theroundup.org.

Ft. Worth: Learn about gourds and make a gourd birdhouse at the Fort Worth Botanic Garden/Tarrant County Master Gardener classes for families, Saturday, September 28, 10 a.m. at the FWBG Backyard  Vegetable  Garden pavilion. Cost is $5 per family (up to four family members). Class limit: 20. Children must be five years or older and must be accompanied by a parent or grandparent. Pre-registration is required. To register and for more information/directions, contact Billie Hammack at blhammack@ag.tamu.edu or call 817-884-1296.

Humble: Garden Faire will be held Saturday and Sunday, September 28 and 29, 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. at Mercer Arboretum & Botanic, located one mile north of FM 1960 at 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble. Enjoy Mercer’s free outdoor festival for gardeners of all ages. Stroll along the wooded trails and purchase new plants or crafts while learning about community-based horticulture and environmental activities. Kids can take part in nature-inspired crafts in Kid’s Korner or enjoy rides around the picnic loop with Stan the Train Man. For more information, call 281-443-8731 or visit www.hcp4.net/mercer.

La Marque: “Perennials for the Gulf Coast — Plant Sale Preview” Saturday, September 28, 9-11 a.m. Heidi Sheesley of Treesearch Farms will give a presentation highlighting the plants that will be available at the October 12th Galveston County Master Gardener Ornamental & Perennial Sale. Seminar will be held at the Wayne Johnson Community Center. Galveston County AgriLife Extension Office in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (FM 519), La Marque. For course reservations, call 281-534-3413, ext. 12 or email GALV3@wt.net.

The Woodlands: Meet the experts and discover trends in water-wise gardening at Woodlands Landscaping Solutions, on Saturday, September 28 from 9 a.m. to noon at 8203 Millennium Forest Dr., The Woodlands. Booths and demonstrations spotlight water-saving methods, rainwater harvesting, lawn care, vegetable and habitat gardening, easy care techniques and more! Native plants, herbs, heirloom bulbs, compost bins, garden gifts and organic products will be for sale. Free event. For more information, call 210-210-3800 or visit www.thewoodlandstownship-tx.gov/gardenevents.

Houston: Sustainable Living Through Permaculture 1: SLTP 1. The design principles of Permaculture (PC) are explained, observed and illustrated in a series of breakout sessions at a home and garden remodeled to reflect PC sustainability principles. Sunday, September 29. 2-6 p.m. $50. NE Loop Residence. Location to be provided to enrolled students. For more information, call 713-880-5540 or visit www.urbanharvest.org.

OCTOBER

Midland: Permian Basin Master Gardeners  will present Growing Beautiful Roses in West Texas on October 3 at Midland Extension Office, 2445 E. Hwy 80, Midland. For more information, call 432-498-4071.

Burnet: On October 5,the Highland Lakes Native Plant Society of Texas chapter will present their 4th annual Native Plant Festival and Garden Tour, featuring Cathy Downs from Comfort, Texas, Chairman of the "Bring Back the Monarchs to Texas" (BBMT) Program. Cathy is also a certified Monarch Larval Monitoring Project educator and teaches Monarch biology, habitat, and migration at various locations throughout Texas. Since certifying as a Texas Master Naturalist with the Hill Country chapter in 2005, she has been teaching children and adults about native Texas butterflies and their host plants with an emphasis on Monarch biology and migration. Cathy raises Monarch caterpillars for education and also propagates native milkweed. She hosts live Butterfly Pavilions at Nature Centers and State Parks throughout the Hill Country area. The free festival will be held from 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. at Inks Dam National Fish Hatchery near Burnet. Cathy Downs will give her presentation at 10:30 a.m. Other activities include a native plant sale, native tree adoptions, information booths about butterflies, plants, and other nature-related topics, a bird blind, nature walks and hikes, a watershed demonstration, activities for the kids, and much more. The tours of three lovely native plant gardens in the region will be from noon - 4 p.m. and will cost $5 for adults. In addition to the Native Plant Society, members of the Highland Lakes Master Naturalists, Master Gardeners, Birding & Wildflower Society, and Friends of the Inks Dam National Fish Hatchery are sponsoring and will be volunteering at the festival and tour. For more information, visit http://www.yantislakesidegardens.com/npsot.

Denton: Join the Denton County Master Gardener Association at its annual Fall Garden Festival from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, October 5. at the Denton Bible Church campus, 2300 E. University Dr., Denton (corner of Nottingham and Mingo). Learn more about water-wise landscape practices while touring booths filled with local crafts and gardening information. Adults can enjoy presentations on water conservation, landscaping and home and garden decorating and listen to live music by local choral groups. Children's activities include a bounce house, a petting zoo and face painting. Food and drinks are available at the 4H concession stand. Don’t miss the opportunity to win door prizes or bid on silent auction items. More information is available at: http://dcmga.com/events/.

Jasper: Master Gardener plant sale at the Butterfly Festival & Fall Fest in downtown Jasper, October 5. Butterfly Festival includes free programs on how to attract pollinators to your garden, the monarch migration and more; free children's activities, scavenger hunt and several butterfly releases. In the butterfly garden learn about host plants for different species and organic control methods for unwanted pests. For more information contact the Texas A&M AgriLife office at 409-384-3721 or visit jasper.agrilife.org.

McKinney: The Collin County Master Gardeners Association will hold their 10th Annual Exclusive Bulb Sale with  a new twist this year. Tried and true heirloom and naturalizing bulbs will be available by pre-order only from August 1-31, with the event to be concluded with a Bulb and Perennial Mart on Saturday, October 5, at Myers Park and Event Center in McKinney. CCMGA will be selling a selection of perennials, and more spring, summer, and fall blooming bulbs at the Bulb and Perennial Mart. The perennials offered at the sale have been proven to be winners in the research and demonstration gardens at Myers Park. These Texas tough plants will add a splash of color to the garden throughout the year. The bulbs are researched and proven to be suitable for our climate and soil extremes. These lovely bloomers are perennial, do not require pre-chilling, are drought tolerant, and are excellent choices for water-wise gardens. Many of these hard to find bulbs are not available for purchase at local nurseries. Information about the Bulb and Perennial Mart, and a color brochure with descriptions of bulbs available for the pre-sale and an order form are available for downloading at the CCMGA Website: ccmgatx.org. Mailed orders must be accompanied by a check or money order payable to CCMGA and must be received by August 31, 2013. Visa and Mastercard accepted for online orders only. Please call the Collin County Master Gardeners Association at 1-972-548-4219 or 1-972-548-4232 for questions, additional information, and presentation schedule.

Nacogdoches: The SFA Gardens at Stephen F. Austin State University will host its annual Fabulous Fall Festival Plant Sale from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. Saturday, October 5, at the SFA Pineywoods Native Plant Center, 2900 Raguet St. in historic Nacogdoches. A wide variety of hard-to-find, “Texas tough” plants will be available, including Texas natives, heirlooms, tropicals, perennials, shrubs, trees, and exclusive Greg Grant and SFA introductions. Most of the plants are extensively trialed in the gardens before being offered to the public and most are produced by the SFA Gardens staff and volunteers. This popular event benefits the SFA Mast Arboretum, Pineywoods Native Plant Center, Ruby M. Mize Azalea Garden, Gayla Mize Garden, and educational programs hosted at the gardens. The educational programs at SFA Gardens reach more than 15,000 students ages 1 to 100 on a yearly basis. The public is encouraged to arrive early and bring a wagon. For more information, call (936) 468-4404, or visit www.sfagardens.sfasu.edu two weeks before the sale for a list of available plants.

Dallas: “Trees for North Texas” will be presented October 8, 6 p.m. until 7 p.m. at 17360 Coit Road, Dallas. This program teaches proper tree selection and planting for North Texas. Selecting the right tree and planting it properly helps improve the sustainability of your home or business landscape. Tree list provided. For more information and to register, visit http://dallas.tamu.edu or email urbanwater@tamu.edu.

Seguin: The Guadalupe Master Gardeners will meet on Thursday, October 8, at the AgriLife Building, 210 E. Live Oak, Seguin. The meeting will start at 7 p.m. with Liz Palfini, Texas Parks and Wildlife, speaking on “Weeding through Heirlooms, Historic and Just Plain Good Old Days Gardening Propaganda.” The meeting is free and open to the public. The regular business meeting will take place at the end of the program. For further information visit, www.guadalupemastergardeners.org.

Conroe: Montgomery County Master Gardeners will present "Landscaping with Texas Natives" 7 p.m. until 9 p.m., Wednesday, October 9, at the Thomas LeRoy Education Center, 9020 Airport Road, Conroe. "Landscape Design with Texas Natives" will be presented by Wm. Alan King, Registered Landscape Architect. "Why Choose Natives?" and "Native Alternatives" will be presented by Diana Foss, Texas Parks and Wildlife. Registration is $20 per person, due by October 1. Late Registration will be $25. Door prizes! Registration form and more information available at http://www.mcmga.com/, www.facebook/montgomerymastergardenerassociation or by calling 936-539-7824.

Bryan/College Station: Brazos County Master Gardeners present an Autumn Garden Tour from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m., Saturday, October 12. The gardens include: Versatile Suburban Garden with Edibles and Ornamentals, 3913 Lienz Lane, College Station; Resourceful Native Plant and Wildlife Haven w/Harvested Rainwater, 11785 Durrand, College Station; Charming, Old-Fashioned Cottage Garden, 201 Hensel Avenue, Bryan; Ambitious Vegetable, Fruit and Native Garden, 3198 Golden Trail, College Station. Gardens may be visited in any order but are NOT stroller or handicap accessible. $10 per adult-Good for all four gardens and are available at Brazos County Master Gardeners‘ exhibit at Brazos County Fair and Expo 9/5-8 (cash or checks); Brazos County Office of Texas AgriLife Extension Service (checks only); on the day of the tour at any garden home (cash or checks). For additional information, call 979.823-0129 or visit brazosmg.com.

Houston/Ft. Worth: A total of 10 Texas gardeners will share their private gardens with the public in 2013 through the Garden Conservancy’s Open Days program, America’s only national private garden-visiting program. Open Days in Texas take place on the following dates. Sunday, October 13: Visit four private gardens open in Fort Worth, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Features include a country estate with formal spaces and an organic orchard, an urban garden using earth-friendly methods and native plants, sculptural pieces and unusual container plantings, and a cottage garden focused around a fountain and large planting beds. Each of these Open Days Program dates is self-guided and no reservations are required. A $5 admission fee collected at each garden supports the national preservation work of the Garden Conservancy. The Open Days program features hundreds of magnificent spaces not normally open to the public. From April through October, garden hosts across the country welcome the opportunity to learn and exchange gardening ideas, and give the public access to explore and enjoy their private gardens. For a complete list of the more than 300 private gardens participating in eighteen states, visit the Garden Conservancy and its Open Days program online at www.opendaysprogram.org or call toll-free weekdays, 1-888-842-2442. The 2013 Open Days Directory ($21.95 including shipping and handling) is the only comprehensive source for details on the 2013 season. The Directory provides descriptions, visiting dates and hours, and driving directions to each private garden. The Directory also includes one free admission ticket to any private garden participating in the program, a $5 value. To purchase a Directory or to join the Garden Conservancy as a member and receive a free copy, call 1-888-842-2442 or visit www.opendaysprogram.org.

Seguin: The Guadalupe Master Gardeners will meet on Thursday, October 19, at the AgriLife Building, 210 E. Live Oak, Seguin. The meeting will start at 7 p.m. with Liz Palfini, Texas Parks and Wildlife, presenting “Weeding Through Heirlooms, Historic and Just Plain Good Old Days Gardening Propaganda.” The meeting is free and open to the public. The regular business meeting will be held at the end of the program. For further information visit www.guadalupecountymastergardeners.org.

MONTHLY MEETINGS

FIRST WEEK

Houston: The Harris County Master Gardeners meet at noon the first Tuesday of each month at the Texas AgriLife Extension, 3033 Bear Creek Drive (near the intersection of Highway 6 and Patterson Road), Houston. For additional information visit http://hcmga.tamu.edu or call 281-855-5600.

Wichita Falls: The Wichita County Master Gardener Association meets at 5:30 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 600 Scott Street, Wichita Falls, on the first Tuesday of each month. For more information, visit www.txmg.org/wichita or call 940-716-8610.

Kilgore: Northeast Texas Organic Gardeners meets at 1 p.m. on the first Wednesday of each month. For more information, call Carole Ramke at 903-986-9475.

New Braunfels: The Comal Master Gardeners meet at 6 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month (except December) at the GVTC Auditorium, 36101 FM 3159, New Braunfels. An educational program preceeds the business meeting. The public is invited to attend. For additional information, call 830-620-3440 or visit http://txmg.org/comal/.

Allen: The Allen Garden Club meets at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month, February through December, at the Allen Heritage Center, 100 E. Main St., Allen. For more information, visit www.allengardenclub.org.

Brownwood: The Brown County Master Gardeners Association meets the first Thursday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 605 Fisk Ave., Brownwood. For further information, call Mary Green Engle at 325-784-8453.

Gonzalas: Gonzales Master Gardeners hold their monthly meeting at noon on the first Thursday of each month at 623 Fair Street, Gonzales. Bring a bag lunch, drinks provided. Contact AgriLife Extension Office at 830-672-8531 or visit http://gonzalesmastergardeners.org for more information.

SECOND WEEK

Austin: Austin Organic Gardeners Club meets at 6:30 p.m. on the second Monday of each month (except December) at the Austin Area Garden Center, 2220 Barton Springs Road, Zilker Botanical Gardens in Austin. For more information, visit www.austinorganicgardeners.org.

Evant: The Evant Garden Club meets on the second Tuesday of each month at 10 a.m., usually at the bank in downtown Evant. To confirm the date, time and place of each month's meeting, call 254-471-5585.

Marion: The Guadalupe County (Schertz/Seguin) Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets on the second Tuesday of each month except July, August and December at St. John’s Lutheran Church in Marion. Directions to St. John’s Lutheran Church: From FM 78 turn south onto FM 465 and the church is just past the Marion School on the right. From IH-10 go north on FM 465 towards Marion. The Church will be on the left, just before you get to town. A plant exchange and meet-and-greet begins at 6:30 p.m. followed by the program at 7 p.m. Visitors are welcome. For more information or an application to join NPSOT visit www.npsot.org/GuadalupeCounty/ or contact guadalupecounty@npsot.org.

Quitman: The Quitman Garden Club meets at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month at the Quitman Library on E Goode Street, Quitman. It is a diverse group that welcomes all visitors. For more information, e-mail quitmangardenclub@gmail.com.

Denton: The Denton County Master Gardener Association meets from 9:30 a.m. until 11 a.m. the second Wednesday of each month at 401 W. Hickory St., Denton. Meetings are open to the public. More information is available at: http://dcmga.com/.

Humble: The Mercer Arboretum & Botanic Garden, 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble, hosts a Lunch Bunch the second Wednesday of each month from noon until 2 p.m. Take a sack lunch or order a box lunch from Starbucks when you call 281-443-8731 to reserve your spot. Master Gardeners and Masters Naturalists may earn CEU credits by attending.

Jacksboro: The Jacksboro Garden Club meets at 9:30 a.m. the second Wednesday of each month (except June, July and August) at the Concerned Citizens Center, 400 East Pine Street, Jacksboro. For more information, call Melinda at 940-567-6218.

Longview: The Gregg County Master Gardeners Association meets the second Wednesday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 405 E. Marshall Ave., Longview. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program preceding the business meeting. For further information call Cindy Gill at 903-236-8429 or visit www.gregg-tx.tamu.edu.

Rockport: The Rockport Herb & Rose Study Group, founded in March 2003, meets the second Wednesday of each month at 10 a.m. at 619 N. Live Oak Street, Room 14, Rockport, to discuss all aspects of using and growing herbs, including historical uses and tips for successful propagation and cultivation. Sometimes they take field trips and have cooking demonstrations in different locations. For more information, contact Linda 361-729-6037, Ruth 361-729-8923 or Cindy 979-562-2153 or visit www.rockportherbs.org and http://rockportherbies.blogspot.com.

Woodway: The McLennan County Master Gardeners meet on the second Wednesday each month at noon at the Carleen Bright Arboretum, 9001 Bosque Blvd., Woodway. Educational programs follow the business session. For more information, call 254-757-5180.

Beaumont: The Jefferson County Master Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the AgriLife Extension Office, 1225 Pearl Street, Suite 200, Beaumont. For more information, call 409-835-8461.

Georgetown: The Williamson County Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the Georgetown Public Library, 402 W. 8th Street. Georgetown. For additional information, contract Billye Adams at 512-863-9636 or visit http://www.npsot.org/WilliamsonCounty/default.htm.

Orange: The Orange County Master Gardeners Association holds their monthly meeting on the second Thursday of each month. A short program is presented. The meeting starts at 6:30 p.m. at the Salvation Army Bldg. cor. MLK & Strickland in Orange. Pot luck supper at 6 p.m. Visit http://txmg.org/orange for more information.

San Antonio: The San Antonio Herb Society meets at 7 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month at the San Antonio Garden Center, 3310 N. New Braunfels (corner of Funston & N. New Braunfels). For more information on programs, visit www.sanantonioherbs.org.

Angleton: The Brazoria County Master Gardeners meet at 11 a.m. on the second Friday of each month at the Brazoria County Extension Office, 21017 County Road 171, Angleton. There is a general business meeting followed by a brief educational program each month. For further information call 979-864-1558, ext.110.

College Station: The A&M Garden Club meets on the second Friday of each month during the school year at 9:30 a.m. in the training room of the College Station Waste Water Facility building at the end of North Forest Parkway, College Station. Expert speakers, plant sharing, and federated club projects help members learn about gardening in the Brazos Valley, floral design, conservation, and more. For more information, visit http://www.amgardenclub.com/.

Houston: The Spring Branch African Violet Club meets the second Saturday of each month, January through November, at 10:30am at the Copperfield Baptist Church, 8350 Highway 6 North, Houston. Call Karla at 281-748-8417 prior to attending to confirm meeting date and time.

Dallas: The Rainbow Garden Club of North Texas meets the second Sunday of each month at 2 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Meetings are held at member’s homes and garden centers around the area. For more information, visit www.RainbowGardenClub.com.

THIRD WEEK

Arlington: The Arlington Men's Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the third Monday of each month (except December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact Lance Jepson at LJepson@aol.com.

Cleburne: The Johnson County Master Gardeners meet at 2 p.m. on the third Monday of each month at McGregor House, 1628 W. Henderson, Cleburne, which includes a program and a meet & greet. For more information, call Sharon Smith at 817-894-7700.

Corpus Christi: The Nueces Master Gardeners meet at noon the third Tuesday of each month, except December, at Garden Senior Center, 5325 Greely Dr., Corpus Christi. An educational program precedes the business meeting. For further information call 361 767-5217.

Rockport: Monthly meetings of the Aransas/San Patricio Master Gardeners are held at 10 a.m. on the third Tuesday of each month at Texas AgriLife Extension Service - Aransas County Office, 892 Airport Rd., Rockport. For additional information, e-mail aransas-tx@tamu.edu or call 361-790-0103.

Sugar Land: The Sugar Land Garden Club meets on the third Tuesday of each month, September through November and January through April at 10 a.m. at the Sugar Land Community Center, 226 Matlage Way, Sugar Land. The club hosts a different speaker each month. For more information, visit www.sugarlandgardenclub.org.

Denton: The Denton Organic Society, a group devoted to sharing information and educating the public regarding organic principles, meets the third Wednesday of each month (except July, August and December) at the Denton Senior Center, 509 N. Bell Avenue. Meetings are free and open to the public. Meetings begin at 7 p.m. and are preceded by a social at 6:30. For more information, call 940-382-8551.

Glen Rose: The Somervell County Master Gardeners meet at 10 a.m., the third Wednesday of each month at the Somervell County AgriLife Extension office, 1405 Texas Drive, Glen Rose. Visitors are welcome. For more information, call 254-897-2809 or visit www.somervellmastergardeners.org.

Granbury: The Lake Granbury Master Gardeners meet at 1 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at the Hood County Annex 1, 1410 West Pearl Street, Granbury. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program each month preceding the business meeting. For information on topics call 817-579-3280 or visit http://www.hoodcountymastergardeners.org/.

Seabrook: The Harris County Precinct 2 Master Gardeners hold an educational program at 10 a.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at The Meeting Room at Clear Lake Park (on the Lakeside), 5001 NASA Road 1, Seabrook. The programs are free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu.

Brownwood: Brownwood Garden Club meets the third Thursday of each month, 11:30 a.m.– 1 p.m.  The club meetings are at Southside Baptist Church, 1219 Indian Creek Road, with refreshments and a speaker presentation. Visitors are welcome. For more information, email boeblingen@centex.net or call 817-454-8175).

Houston: The Native Plant Society of Texas — Houston (NPSOT-H) meets at 7:30 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except for October (4th Thursday) and December (2nd Thursday). Location varies. For locations, for more information on programs, and for information about native plants for Houston, visit http://www.npsot.org/Houston.

Rosenberg: The Fort Bend Master Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except December at the Bud O’Shieles Community Center located at 1330 Band Road, Rosenberg. For more information, call 281-341-7068 or visit www.fbmg.com.

Seguin: The Guadalupe County Master Gardeners meets at 7 p.m. the third Thursday of each month, except June and December, at the Texas AgriLife Extension Bldg. at 210 E. Live Oak, Seguin. An educational program precedes the business meeting. The public is invited to attend. For topic or other information, call 830-379-1972 or visit www.guadalupecountymastergardeners.org.

FOURTH WEEK

Brackenridge Park: The Native Plant Society San Antonio Chapter meets every fourth Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. in the Lions Field Adult and Senior Center, 2809 Broadway at E. Mulberry, Brackenridge Park, except August and December. Social and seed/plant exchange at 6:30 p.m. Free and open to the public. For more information, contact Bea at 210-999-7292 or visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio.

Bryan: The Brazos County Master Gardeners, a program of Texas AgriLife Extension, meet the fourth Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. at the Brazos Center, 3232 Briarcrest Drive, Bryan. There is a public gardening program at each meeting and pertinent information may be found at brazosmg.com or 979-823-0129.

Edna: The Jackson County Master Gardeners present their "Come Grown With Us" seminars on the fourth Tuesday of each month, January through October, beginning at 7 p.m. at 411 N. Wells, Edna. The seminars are free, open to the public and offer 2 CEU hours to Master Gardeners or others requiring them. For additional information, contact the Jackson County Extension Office at 361-782-3312.

Linden: The Caddo Wildflower Chapter of Native Plants Society meets the fourth Tuesday of each month at the senior citizens building at 507 S Kaufman St. in Linden at 6:30. Visitors are welcome. For additional information, contact Karen Tromza at khtromza@yahoo.com.

Fort Worth: The Organic Garden Club of Forth Worth meets at 7 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday of each month except July and December at the Deborah Beggs Moncrief Garden Center, 3220 Botanic Blvd., Ft. Worth. Refreshments are served. For more information, call 817-263-9322 or visit www.ogcfw.webs.com.

San Antonio: The Native Plant Society of Texas San Antonio Chapter meets the fourth Tuesday of each month, except August and December, at the Lions Field Adult & Senior Center, 2809 Broadway, San Antonio. Social and plant/seed exchange at 6:30 p.m., program at 7:00 p.m. For more information, visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio or call Bea at 210-999-7292.

Houston: The Houston Chapter of the Native Prairie Association of Texas (HNPAT) meets from 7 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. the fourth Wednesday of each month at Bayland Park Community Center, 6400 Bissonnet, Houston. For more information, contact hnpat@prairies.org.

Leander: The Leander Garden Club meets on the fourth Thursday of each month (except July and August) at 10:30 a.m. at the community room behind the Greater Texas Federal Credit Union,1300 N. Bell, Cedar Park, unless there is special event planned. Following a program and short business meeting, we share a pot-luck luncheon. To confirm the meeting place and time, please call president Cathy Clark-Ramsey at 512-963-4698 or email info@leandergc.org.

Dallas: The Dallas County Master Gardeners meet the fourth Thursday of each month at 11:30 a.m. For location and program information, visit http://www.dallascountymastergardeners.org/ or contact The Helpdesk, M-F, 8 to 4:30 214-904-3053.

Dallas: The Greater Dallas Organic Garden Club meets at 7:00 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of each month at the REI, 4515 LBJ Freeway, Dallas. For more information, call 214-824-2448 or visit www.gdogc.org.

Arlington: The Arlington Organic Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the last Thursday of each month (except November and December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact David at 817-483-7746.


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Texas Gardener’s Seeds is published weekly. © Suntex Communications, Inc. 2013. All rights reserved. You may forward this publication to your friends and colleagues if it is sent in its entirety. No individual part of this newsletter may be reproduced in any manner without prior written permission from the publisher.

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Publisher: Chris S. Corby ● Editor: Michael Bracken

Texas Gardener’s Seeds, P.O. Box 9005, Waco, Texas 76714 ● www.TexasGardener.com